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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

On The Threshold: Breadwinning, Capitalism And The Absent/Present Father In The Works Of Three Late 20th-Century U.S. Novelists, Nancy J. Hoch Sep 2015

On The Threshold: Breadwinning, Capitalism And The Absent/Present Father In The Works Of Three Late 20th-Century U.S. Novelists, Nancy J. Hoch

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

As society industrialized in the nineteenth century and jobs moved outside the home, a figure which I call the absent/present father began to make his appearance in American literature. This figure, hovering physically or emotionally on the threshold of family life, never completely present but never completely absent either, has filled the pages of fiction from that time until recently when, as the U.S. becomes postindustrial, depictions of the absent/present father decline.

Bringing a socio-economic as opposed to the usual psychological perspective to my close readings of the fictional family, I explore the cultural work the absent ...


The Heterotopia Of Flight: Resisting The Domestic, Sarah Elizabeth Davis Sep 2015

The Heterotopia Of Flight: Resisting The Domestic, Sarah Elizabeth Davis

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

The familiar image of a woman fleeing danger is a well-worn convention of heroine-centered fiction, a plot device inevitably resolved when the heroine returns safely to her home and family. This dissertation proposes a new reading of that narrative by asserting that rather than serving as a space of protection, the home poses the greatest threat to an individual's autonomy. If we understand the domestic as a space in which bodies are ordered and, more specifically, gendered, classed, and raced, the trope of flight from the domestic can be read as an act of resistance to subjugation. This act ...


Theater Matters: Female Theatricality In Hawthorne, Alcott, Brontë, And James, Keiko Miyajima Sep 2015

Theater Matters: Female Theatricality In Hawthorne, Alcott, Brontë, And James, Keiko Miyajima

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation examines the ways the novelists on both sides of the Atlantic use the figure of the theatrical woman to advance claims about the nature and role of women. Theater is a deeply paradoxical art form: Seen at once as socially constitutive and promoting mass conformity, it is also criticized as denaturalizing, decentering, etiolating, queering, feminizing. These anxieties coalesce around the image of the actress. In nineteenth century fiction, the image of a woman performing on stage is a powerful one, suggestive of ideal femininity, but also of negative traits including deception, artificiality and an unfeminine appetite for public ...


Touching Brains, Jason Tougaw Jul 2015

Touching Brains, Jason Tougaw

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


Errant Memory In African American Literature Of The Long Nineteenth Century, Tristan Alexander Striker May 2015

Errant Memory In African American Literature Of The Long Nineteenth Century, Tristan Alexander Striker

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

In this dissertation, I trace the complex black literary trope of errant memory through American and African American literature. Authors of African descent are constantly subjected to what I call Africanity, or the paratextual historicizing elements provided by white interlocutors that seek to impose specific caricatures and stereotypes on them and their works to force them into the American historical narrative that depends on their dehumanized and commodified status. These caricatures and stereotypes are rooted in an Africa imagined by these white interlocutors, one that does not match any reality. Authors of African descent transcend this paratextual Africanity through what ...


New York City Street Theater: Gender, Performance, And The Urban From Plessy To Brown, Erin Nicholson Gale May 2015

New York City Street Theater: Gender, Performance, And The Urban From Plessy To Brown, Erin Nicholson Gale

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation investigates the ordinary, public performances of fictional female characters in novels set on the streets of Manhattan during the years of legal segregation in the United States. I examine a range of actions from bragging to racial passing, and I argue these ordinary performances are central to our ability to interpret race, gender, and class relations. I detect race, class, and gender-based impulses to segregate and exclude others that overlap with the motives guiding the national, legal edict to segregate people by race. These guiding inclinations, legible through the history of Manhattan's grid, zoning laws, and the ...


Loosening The Critical Corset: New Approaches To The Short Fiction Of Kate Chopin And Ruth Stuart, Kathryn Erin O'Donoghue Feb 2015

Loosening The Critical Corset: New Approaches To The Short Fiction Of Kate Chopin And Ruth Stuart, Kathryn Erin O'Donoghue

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

My dissertation uses the works and lives of two popular late-nineteenth-century writers, Ruth McEnery Stuart and Kate Chopin, as a heuristic to solve the literary mystery of how "fiction by women" became "women's fiction." While feminist scholars resuscitated Chopin, Stuart remains ignored. The realism and irony of Chopin's novel The Awakening resonate with modern readers, but the sentimental aspects of Stuart's work and Chopin's short fiction remain problematic. The aesthetic movements of realism and naturalism influenced literary taste to the extent that sentimentalism is anathema to contemporary critics. I participate in recent scholarship that explores how ...


The Literary Legacy Of The Federal Writers' Project, Sara Rendene Rutkowski Feb 2015

The Literary Legacy Of The Federal Writers' Project, Sara Rendene Rutkowski

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Established by President Roosevelt in 1935 as part of the New Deal, the Federal Writers' Project (FWP) put thousands of unemployed professionals to work documenting American life during the Depression. Federal writers--many of whom would become famous, including Ralph Ellison, Nelson Algren, Saul Bellow, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, and Dorothy West--collected reams of oral histories and folklore, and produced hundreds of guides to cities and states across the country. Yet, despite both the Project's extraordinary volume of writing and its unprecedented support for writers, few critics have examined it from a literary perspective. Instead, the FWP ...


Dark Matter: Susan Howe, Muriel Rukeyser, And The Scholar's Art, Stefania Heim Feb 2015

Dark Matter: Susan Howe, Muriel Rukeyser, And The Scholar's Art, Stefania Heim

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Instead of describing poetry as a set of constraints or history of practices, Muriel Rukeyser calls it "one kind of knowledge." Dark Matter heeds Rukeyser's call, theorizing a poetics of the "scholar's art," in which documentary investigation, autobiographical exploration, and formal innovation are mutual, interwoven concerns. The dissertation pairs American poets Susan Howe (b. 1937) and Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980), reading their hybrid works not through the received categories of American poetry, or through common generic and disciplinary divisions, but using an inductive methodology that takes its lead from the poets. Understanding Howe and Rukeyser's literary experiments as ...


Protofeminist Women In Bronte’S Jane Eyre And Braddon’S Lady Audley’S Secret, Allison Wong Jan 2015

Protofeminist Women In Bronte’S Jane Eyre And Braddon’S Lady Audley’S Secret, Allison Wong

Dissertations and Theses

No abstract provided.


Doubling And Multiplying The Self/Story In Catherynne M. Valente's The Ice Puzzle: Readers, Writers, And The Best Of All Girls, Veronica Schanoes Jan 2015

Doubling And Multiplying The Self/Story In Catherynne M. Valente's The Ice Puzzle: Readers, Writers, And The Best Of All Girls, Veronica Schanoes

Publications and Research

Is there a difference between the doubled self and the multiplied self? Using Kelly Link’s “The Girl Detective,” a revision of “The Twelve Dancing Princesses,” and Catherynne M. Valente’s online novel The Ice Puzzle, a revision of Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Snow Queen,” I suggest that the joy taken in the multiplied self in these texts reflects the nontraditional approaches to publishing and their readers that these authors have taken.


Middle Eastern-American Literature: A Contemporary Turn In Emerson Studies, Roger Sedarat Jan 2015

Middle Eastern-American Literature: A Contemporary Turn In Emerson Studies, Roger Sedarat

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


Why George Has To Die: Gloria Naylor’S Mama Day And The Myth Of The Goddess, Thomas R. Frosch Jan 2015

Why George Has To Die: Gloria Naylor’S Mama Day And The Myth Of The Goddess, Thomas R. Frosch

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


Collecting To The Core: American Crime Fiction, Michael Adams Jan 2015

Collecting To The Core: American Crime Fiction, Michael Adams

Publications and Research

Overview of key secondary works analyzing American crime fiction: general works, works dealing with specific periods, works dealing with crime fiction by women and African Americans.