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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Maria Susanna Cummins' London Letters: April 1860, Heidi Lm Jacobs Sep 2016

Maria Susanna Cummins' London Letters: April 1860, Heidi Lm Jacobs

Heidi LM Jacobs

Within scholarship on Maria Susanna Cummins (1827-1866), there are two recurrent phrases: "author of the best-selling novel The Lamplighter" and "little is known about her life." Despite the early contextualization of Cummins by various scholars, most of the recent critical work on Cummins has centered on her first and best-known novel, The Lamplighter (1854). Very little critical attention has been paid to Cummins's life, her career as a publishing author, her lesser known novels, her periodical publications, and her archived letters. Written in the weeks preceding the publication in the United States and Britain of her third novel, El ...


Fictional Journalists: News Work In American Novels, Bonnie Brennen Feb 2016

Fictional Journalists: News Work In American Novels, Bonnie Brennen

Bonnie Brennen

No abstract provided.


Conquering A Wilderness: Destruction And Development On The Great Plains In Mari Sandoz's Old Jules, Lisa Lindell Jan 2016

Conquering A Wilderness: Destruction And Development On The Great Plains In Mari Sandoz's Old Jules, Lisa Lindell

Lisa R. Lindell

Jules Ami Sandoz came to America in 1881 at the age of 22. Following a three-year sojourn in northeastern Nebraska, he headed further west, settling in the recently surveyed region northwest of the Nebraska Sandhills. In Old Jules, the biography of her pioneer father, Mari Sandoz presented a character filled with conflicts and contradictions. Pitted against Jules's dynamic vision of community growth was his self-centered and destructive nature. Well aware of the more unsavory qualities exhibited by her father. Sandoz nonetheless maintained that he and others like him were necessary to the development of the West. This recognition did ...


"Some Perilous Stuff": What The Religious Reviewers Really Said About The Scarlet Letter, Lisa Smith Sep 2015

"Some Perilous Stuff": What The Religious Reviewers Really Said About The Scarlet Letter, Lisa Smith

Lisa Smith

No abstract provided.


"The Livery Of Religion": Reconciling Swift's Argument And Project, Lisa Smith Sep 2015

"The Livery Of Religion": Reconciling Swift's Argument And Project, Lisa Smith

Lisa Smith

Discusses Jonathan Swift's essays `An Argument Against Abolishing Christianity' and `Project for the Advancement of Religion and Reformation of Manners' with their focus on Christianity and the values of the society. Christian hypocrisy; Power and influence of the Church; Reader's perception of Swift's work.


Hawthorne And The Christian Review: Three New Discoveries, Lisa Smith Sep 2015

Hawthorne And The Christian Review: Three New Discoveries, Lisa Smith

Lisa Smith

No abstract provided.


The Continental Op And Women, Mary Freier Jul 2015

The Continental Op And Women, Mary Freier

Mollie Freier

The Continental Op, by his own admission, does not fit the stereotype of the hardboiled detective. At five foot six, one hundred ninety pounds, he would be more likely to be played on film by Danny DeVito or Jason Alexander than Humphrey Bogart or Alan Ladd. However, Dinah Brand, the primary female character in Red Harvest, does not conform to the stereotype of the femme fatale. In many ways, the Op is much more practical than his counterparts in Hammett’s other fiction, and Dinah Brand, a large, powerful woman, is drastically different from her counterparts as well. In this ...


Cats As Detectives In Library Mysteries, Mary Freier Jul 2015

Cats As Detectives In Library Mysteries, Mary Freier

Mollie Freier

Cats have become ubiquitous as detectives or detective assistants in twenty-first century mysteries, although the trend began with the “The Cat Who” books, the first of which was published in the nineteen-sixties. Cats have a fine history in the detective genre, but current depictions of cats as detectives include the cats conversing with other animals and even the human detective in the novel. Some of these cats possess supernatural abilities, and even those who don't possess impressive intelligence. Cats are notorious, of course, for being curious, and the librarians who function as amateur sleuths are similar in this regard ...


Rare Books In Detective Fiction: Information As Object, Mary Freier Jul 2015

Rare Books In Detective Fiction: Information As Object, Mary Freier

Mollie Freier

Library mysteries written since 1970 often depict intrigue surrounding the theft or threatened theft of rare books. Charles Goodrum, a director of the Library of Congress, once wrote that when he decided to write a mystery novel set in a library, he spent an evening coming up with ideas for such a novel. He said that he came up with dozens, but settled on a plot about rare book theft because he thought it would be more accessible to general readers. Many other mystery writers have made the same decision. Although these mysteries are often considered library mysteries and frequently ...


Stalking Glory, H. Rice Dec 2014

Stalking Glory, H. Rice

H. William Rice

No abstract provided.


My Father's Dogs, H. Rice Dec 2014

My Father's Dogs, H. Rice

H. William Rice

No abstract provided.


The Altar At Home: Sentimental Literature And Nineteenth-Century American Religion, Claudia Stokes Aug 2014

The Altar At Home: Sentimental Literature And Nineteenth-Century American Religion, Claudia Stokes

Claudia Stokes

Displays of devout religious faith are very much in evidence in nineteenth-century sentimental novels such as Uncle Tom's Cabin and Little Women, but the precise theological nature of this piety has been little examined. In the first dedicated study of the religious contents of sentimental literature, Claudia Stokes counters the long-standing characterization of sentimental piety as blandly nondescript and demonstrates that these works were in fact groundbreaking, assertive, and highly specific in their theological recommendations and endorsements. The Altar at Home explores the many religious contexts and contents of sentimental literature of the American nineteenth century, from the growth ...


"Emerson, Labor, And Ages Of Turbulence", Andrew Kopec Dec 2013

"Emerson, Labor, And Ages Of Turbulence", Andrew Kopec

Andrew Kopec

This article identifies Ralph Waldo Emerson's notoriously abstract philosophical idealism as a powerful method of economic diagnosis. The essay ends by forging a connection between Emerson's response to crisis in 1837 to our own response in the 21st Century, imagining the importance of risk for literary critics' professional identity.


Dickens And Twain, Tim Shutt Dec 2012

Dickens And Twain, Tim Shutt

Tim Shutt

No abstract provided.


"Irving, Ruin, And Risk", Andrew Kopec Dec 2012

"Irving, Ruin, And Risk", Andrew Kopec

Andrew Kopec

This article offers a new interpretation of Washington Irving and professional authorship, identifying how his experience of financial ruin led him to risk his capital in the literary marketplace.


Woolf And Theories Of Postcolonialism, Sonita Sarker Nov 2012

Woolf And Theories Of Postcolonialism, Sonita Sarker

Sonita Sarker

No abstract provided.


The Short, Happy Life Of The California Partnership Tale, Tara Penry Nov 2012

The Short, Happy Life Of The California Partnership Tale, Tara Penry

Tara Penry

No abstract provided.


Flowers Of Rhetoric: The Evolving Use Of The Language Of Flowers In Margaret Fuller’S Dial Sketches And Poetry, Elizabeth Stoddard’S The Morgesons, Edith Wharton’S Summer, Mary Austin’S Santa Lucia And Cactus Thorn, And Susan Glaspell’S The Verge, Corinne Kopcik Rhyner Mar 2012

Flowers Of Rhetoric: The Evolving Use Of The Language Of Flowers In Margaret Fuller’S Dial Sketches And Poetry, Elizabeth Stoddard’S The Morgesons, Edith Wharton’S Summer, Mary Austin’S Santa Lucia And Cactus Thorn, And Susan Glaspell’S The Verge, Corinne Kopcik Rhyner

Corinne Kopcik Rhyner

The language of flowers was a popular phenomenon in the United States in the nineteenth century. This dissertation on American literature looks at several American women authors’ use of the language of flowers in their novels. I examine the use of the language of flowers in Margaret Fuller’s “Magnolia of Lake Pontachartain,” “Yuca Filamentosa,” and poetry such as “To Sarah,” Elizabeth Stoddard’s The Morgesons, Edith Wharton’s Summer, Mary Austin’s Santa Lucia: A Common Story and Cactus Thorn, and Susan Glaspell’s The Verge. Through analysis of language of flowers dictionaries, historical studies of the language of ...


Bret Harte, Mark Twain And The Art Of Western Storytelling, Tara Penry Feb 2012

Bret Harte, Mark Twain And The Art Of Western Storytelling, Tara Penry

Tara Penry

Many clichés of the U.S. western mythos have been traced to nineteenth-century California writer Bret Harte, including the gambler, the prostitute with a heart of gold, and more. Harte's reputation languishes today largely because of his association with clichés. This lecture offers fresh reasons for appreciating this short-story writer and compares his vision of America and humanity with the vision of the friend-turned-detractor whose reputation outshines Harte's today: Mark Twain. The lecture provides some insight into how the Harte-Twain relationship might have contributed to Harte's eclipse. Enrollees may expect to leave the lecture ready to read ...


Sketching California: The Ethnographic Work Of Gold Rush Literature, 1850--1870, Tara Penry Jan 2012

Sketching California: The Ethnographic Work Of Gold Rush Literature, 1850--1870, Tara Penry

Tara Penry

This study proposes reading small-press "regional" periodicals to discover a more diverse set of traditions in U.S. literary history. In particular, it compares the complex representations of western culture in the literary modes of Gold Rush California magazines with the simplified "local color" view of the west that northeastern magazines disseminated. Chapter one surveys Gold Rush demographics and the history of publishing and related institutions in California of the 1850s and '60s. In chapter two, the picturesque mode is shown to encourage immigration by portraying California as a worthy destination for people of taste. The sentimental mode (chapter 3 ...


Surviving The Waterless Flood: Feminism And Ecofeminsim In Margaret Atwood’S The Handmaid’S Tale, Oryx And Crake, And The Year Of The Flood, Karen Stein Dec 2011

Surviving The Waterless Flood: Feminism And Ecofeminsim In Margaret Atwood’S The Handmaid’S Tale, Oryx And Crake, And The Year Of The Flood, Karen Stein

Karen F Stein

No abstract provided.


Sacrificio, Violencia Y Nación En Lituma En Los Andes De Mario Vargas Llosa, Cesar Valverde Dec 2011

Sacrificio, Violencia Y Nación En Lituma En Los Andes De Mario Vargas Llosa, Cesar Valverde

Cesar Valverde

No abstract provided.


A Journey Of Bread, Holly Butchyk Dec 2011

A Journey Of Bread, Holly Butchyk

Holly Butchyk

No abstract provided.


The Academic Librarian In The Academic Mystery Novel, Mary Freier Apr 2011

The Academic Librarian In The Academic Mystery Novel, Mary Freier

Mollie Freier

No abstract provided.


Osher Institute 5-Week Course On Wallace Stegner, Tara Penry Dec 2010

Osher Institute 5-Week Course On Wallace Stegner, Tara Penry

Tara Penry

No abstract provided.


“Margaret Atwood’S The Blind Assassin As A Modern Bluebeard”, Karen Stein Dec 2010

“Margaret Atwood’S The Blind Assassin As A Modern Bluebeard”, Karen Stein

Karen F Stein

No abstract provided.


The Evocation Of Perspective Diagrams In Wallace Stevens's "To An Old Philosopher In Rome", Nevin Mayer Dec 2010

The Evocation Of Perspective Diagrams In Wallace Stevens's "To An Old Philosopher In Rome", Nevin Mayer

Nevin J Mayer

No abstract provided.


Modelos Masculinos Y Violencia En Sanctuary Y Crónica De Una Muerte Anunciada, Cesar Valverde Dec 2010

Modelos Masculinos Y Violencia En Sanctuary Y Crónica De Una Muerte Anunciada, Cesar Valverde

Cesar Valverde

This essay analyzes how two novels, William Faulkner’s Sanctuary and Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s Chronicle of a Death Foretold, present masculine models that juxtapose power and violence during times of social crisis. Both novels present violent masculinities that overcome peaceful masculinities, in conflicts that result in murders and rapes; but rather than acuse the individuals responsible for the violent acts, the texts point out the social mechanisms that inexorably move the authors of the crimes. In both works we also see violence against women and resulting public deaths of men wrongly accused, which happen due to an inability to ...


Modelos Masculinos Y Violencia En "Sanctuary" Y "Crónica De Una Muerte Anunciada", Cesar Valverde Dec 2010

Modelos Masculinos Y Violencia En "Sanctuary" Y "Crónica De Una Muerte Anunciada", Cesar Valverde

Cesar Valverde

No abstract provided.


Pool Party, Holly Butchyk Dec 2010

Pool Party, Holly Butchyk

Holly Butchyk

No abstract provided.