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Full-Text Articles in Architecture

Americanizing The American Woman: Symbols Of Nationalism In The Ladies Home Journal, 1890-1900, Kaithlyn Kayer Dec 2005

Americanizing The American Woman: Symbols Of Nationalism In The Ladies Home Journal, 1890-1900, Kaithlyn Kayer

Pell Scholars and Senior Theses

When the Ladies’ Home Journal began in 1883, its creator, Mr. Cyrus H. K. Curtis, could not have possibly dreamed that the magazine would grow to be the most influential woman’s journal of all time. A material culture analysis of American nationalistic emblems published in the Ladies’ Home Journal between 1890 and 1900 will determine how Edward Bok, editor, controlled nationalism in the feminine market, displaying the openness of women to nationalism in the late 19th century. It will also reveal how Bok created and controlled an educational tool he deemed “Americanization”, establishing a technique that magazines would replicate ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2005

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

Between 1830 and 1860, Newport became a favored summer haunt for moderately wealthy southerners, Bostonians, New Yorkers, and Philadelphians. Staying at first in boarding houses and hotels, and later in summerhouses termed “cottages,” these summer residents transformed the city from a sleepy, post-Revolutionary ruin into one of the leading resorts in America. The post-Civil War Gilded Age brought with it the “New York invasion” of unbridled wealth and aristocratic ambition, eclipsing this earlier summer society in the popular mind and replacing many of its cottages with palatial mansions. Eliza Cope Harrison and Rosemary F. Carroll return to antebellum Newport in ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2005

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

During the last decades of the nineteenth century, Newport had more than its fair share of remarkable personalities who shaped its unique literary, artistic, and social cultures. Maud Howe Elliott has until now been little recognized for her prominent role in all these areas. This issue of Newport History features an article by Nancy Whipple Grinnell that rectifies this oversight by charting Elliott's important role in the formation of the Art Association of Newport, predecessor to the Newport Art Museum. In the 1870s, the young architect Charles Follen McKim was another Newport habitué of particular note. This issue of ...