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Full-Text Articles in Architecture

Novel Urban Ecosystems: Concepts, Definitions And A Strategy To Support Urban Sustainability And Resilience, Jack F. Ahern Jan 2016

Novel Urban Ecosystems: Concepts, Definitions And A Strategy To Support Urban Sustainability And Resilience, Jack F. Ahern

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Faculty Publication Series

The 21st century is already known for unprecedented and fundamental changes and new trajectories - think climate change, global economics, migration and population growth. The world is now predominantly urban and will become increasingly so until mid-century when global population is expected to stabilize at around 70% urban. The world has entered a new geological era, the Anthropocene, in which the impacts and artifacts of humans are recognized as a geologic force. In this "Century of the City, - for the world to be sustainable and resilient, cities must be an essential part of the solution - and novel urban ecosystems will play ...


Greening Cities In An Urbanizing Age: The Human Health Bases In The Nineteenth And Early Twenty-First Centuries, Theodore S. Eisenman Jan 2016

Greening Cities In An Urbanizing Age: The Human Health Bases In The Nineteenth And Early Twenty-First Centuries, Theodore S. Eisenman

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Faculty Publication Series

Defined here as the introduction or conservation of outdoor vegetation in cities, urban greening has bloomed during periods of intensive urbanization. This was true in the nineteenth century and it seems to be the case again today, as a range of greening practices is co-arising during a third, and perhaps final, period of global urbanization. Human health has been a recurring theme underlying the enduring aspiration to integrate nature with city. Using change over time as a conceptual frame, this paper offers a comparative assessment of municipal greening in the nineteenth and early twenty-first centuries, focusing on the potential implications ...


Using Systematic Observations To Understand Conditions That Promote Interracial Experiences In Neighbourhood Parks, Amy Hillier, Bing Han, Theodore S. Eisenman, Kelly R. Evenson, Thomas L. Mckenzie, Deborah A. Cohen Jan 2016

Using Systematic Observations To Understand Conditions That Promote Interracial Experiences In Neighbourhood Parks, Amy Hillier, Bing Han, Theodore S. Eisenman, Kelly R. Evenson, Thomas L. Mckenzie, Deborah A. Cohen

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Faculty Publication Series

We analysed observations from 31 neighbourhood parks, with each park mapped into smaller target areas for study, across five US cities generated using the System for Observing Play and Recreation in the Community (SOPARC). In areas where at least two people were observed, less than one-third (31.6%) were populated with at least one white and one non-white person. Park areas that were supervised, had one or more people engaged in vigorous activity, had at least one male and one female present, and had one or more teens present were significantly more likely to involve interracial groups (p < 0.01 for each association). Observations in parks located in interracial neighbourhoods were also more likely to involve interracial groups (p < 0.05). Neighbourhood poverty rate had a significant and negative relationship with the presence of interracial groups, particularly in neighbourhoods that are predominantly non-white. Additional research is needed to confirm the impact of these interactions. Urban planning and public health practitioners should consider the health benefits of interracial contact in the design and programming of neighbourhood parks.