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Master's Theses and Project Reports

Hazard Mitigation

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Full-Text Articles in Architecture

Quantifying The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Of Hazards: Incorporating Disaster Mitigation Strategies In Climate Action Plans, Michael Germeraad Mar 2014

Quantifying The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Of Hazards: Incorporating Disaster Mitigation Strategies In Climate Action Plans, Michael Germeraad

Master's Theses and Project Reports

Reconstruction after natural disasters can represent large peaks in a community’s greenhouse gas emission inventory. Components of the built environment destroyed by natural hazards have their useful life shortened, requiring replacement before functionally necessary. Though the hazard itself does not release greenhouse gasses, the demolition and rebuilding process does, and these are the emissions we can quantify to better understand the climate impacts of disasters.

The proposed methodology draws data from existing emission and hazard resource literature and combines the information in a community scale life cycle assessment. Case studies of past disasters are used to refine the methodology ...


Santa Barbara Tea Fire Multi-Hazard Mitigation Benefit Cost Analysis, David S. Flamm Jun 2009

Santa Barbara Tea Fire Multi-Hazard Mitigation Benefit Cost Analysis, David S. Flamm

Master's Theses and Project Reports

ABSTRACT

Santa Barbara Tea Fire Multi-Hazard Mitigation Benefit Cost Analysis

David S Flamm

This study examines the benefits and costs associated with the outright purchase of properties for hazard mitigation (“property acquisition mitigation”) in Santa Barbara, California which reduced four properties’ exposure to multiple hazards. The results indicate that the estimated overall benefit-cost ratio for property acquisition mitigation projects is 1.75:1 when the exposed properties meet a threshold of eminent threat for total loss. This study further suggests that when property acquisitions are performed in an area threatened by multiple hazards the mitigation becomes two to three times ...