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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Architecture

Subversia: The SubUrban Subversive, Emily Cox Dec 2007

Subversia: The SubUrban Subversive, Emily Cox

All Theses

The palimpsest is, by definition, 'writing material (as a parchment or tablet) used one or more times after earlier writing has been erased.' It provides a conceptual field for the layering of text, or meaning, over time. This text may be built up by successive authors and can be altered by additions and erasures. Traces of these amendments remain, providing a history of revision of the original text. Additions that comment on and interpret the primary text are called marginalia.
Landscape operates as a palimpsest, with written, rewritten, erased, and revised layers of history. While typically considered ahistoric, the suburban ...


Incorporating Neighborhood Social Patterns Into Neighborhood Planning Models, Paul Duggan Aug 2007

Incorporating Neighborhood Social Patterns Into Neighborhood Planning Models, Paul Duggan

All Theses

ABSTRACT
Neighborhood models and patterns are used by developers, planners, and urban designers to plan new neighborhoods and guide the revitalization of older ones. Models are typically based on theories about ideal communities and frequently include significant social objectives.
Comparing neighborhood models with studies of neighborhood life, reveals that neighborhood social and behavioral patterns do not always fit the plan or social objectives of the proposed neighborhood models. There is a gap between the objectives and vision of the models and the patterns of life in the neighborhood. Social patterns such as neighboring, urban cognition, travel preferences and personal meaning ...


Reservoir Sedimentation And Property Values, Ronald Leftwich Jr. May 2007

Reservoir Sedimentation And Property Values, Ronald Leftwich Jr.

All Theses

This thesis uses multiple regression analysis in the determination of two hedonic models to explain the impact that sedimentation and algal bloom events may have on property values along Lake Greenwood, SC. Utilizing different independent variables, the hedonic equations reflect the market value and the sales price of the selected lakeside properties. With an average 4.6 percent of the original lake area lost to accreted sediment, the models show a $7,800 to nearly $10,000 average loss in property value or an estimated $5 to $6 million in value lost within the study area. Properties sold within a ...


Adaptive Customization: New Design Opportunities In Orthopedics, Driven By The Merging Of Imaging And Surgery, Marie Mcfaddin May 2007

Adaptive Customization: New Design Opportunities In Orthopedics, Driven By The Merging Of Imaging And Surgery, Marie Mcfaddin

All Theses

The architectural response for an out-patient orthopedic surgery and rehabilitation facility that merges the fields of imaging and surgery needs to be an architecture of changing needs. Orthopedic patients are a diverse population with varied and changing medical treatment needs. The practice of orthopedic medicine is rapidly changing in response to these needs and ongoing advances in medical technology. One of the most significant changes under way today is the merging of surgical and imaging modalities. Settings for the delivery of orthopedic medicine must be able to better accommodate these changing needs by becoming more easily adaptable while being highly ...


The Interactive Medical Emergency Department (Imed): Architectural Integration Of Digital Systems Into The Emergency Care Environment, David Ruthven May 2007

The Interactive Medical Emergency Department (Imed): Architectural Integration Of Digital Systems Into The Emergency Care Environment, David Ruthven

All Theses

In healthcare, the architectural response to the development of information technologies has largely been relegated to a reactive role, essentially waiting for systems to develop and simply accommodating them with appropriately sized spaces. Designing IT systems independently from, rather than integrally with, their environment impedes them from reaching their full potential as vital components in the delivery of care by creating a lack of flexibility, decelerating performance, and degrading the healing environment. The flexibility of the environment is compromised by fixed position, single user data systems which prevent it from actively adapting to changing conditions, especially during volumetric surges associated ...


Integrated Treatment Facility: An Alternative Care Setting For Adults With Mental Illness, Brenna Costello May 2007

Integrated Treatment Facility: An Alternative Care Setting For Adults With Mental Illness, Brenna Costello

All Theses

ABSTRACT The current model of community mental health care does not provide adequate therapeutic settings for many mentally ill patients to fully recovery. Due to this deficiency, patients are falling into a harmful cycle where they are admitted to the hospital through the emergency department, stabilized at the acute care setting, and discharged within a matter of days into the larger community where they have limited access to resources and support networks. At this point, patients become overwhelmed, have another event, and come full circle back to the emergency department. As a result, there is a drastic need for new ...


The Missing Link: Archaeological Resource Protection In Charleston, South Carolina, Kathryne Joseph May 2007

The Missing Link: Archaeological Resource Protection In Charleston, South Carolina, Kathryne Joseph

All Theses

Charleston, South Carolina is one of the nation's leading cities in preservation of its built environment - meaning historically and architecturally significant dwellings, sites, and structures. Protection of the city's underground resources, however, falls considerably behind as there is no archaeological preservation ordinance in place, nor is there an archaeological commission or city archaeologist to oversee and administer development projects potentially affecting significant historic and archaeological remains. The purpose of this study is to address the need for archaeological resource protection for the city by providing a better understanding of the importance of urban archaeology and by examining and ...


Historic Preservation And Revitalization In Working-Class Communities, Paul Woodward May 2007

Historic Preservation And Revitalization In Working-Class Communities, Paul Woodward

All Theses

Historic preservation and revitalization efforts undertaken in lower-income, working-class communities often have negative consequences, including displacement and gentrification. Too often, sense of place and community spirit are sacrificed in an effort to save important historic buildings. As both sense of place and historic fabric are important, it is necessary for preservationists, planners, community members, and others to analyze the current condition under which preservation and revitalization take place, and begin looking at alternatives. Through analysis of case studies that focus on mill villages, three different approaches to preservation and revitalization are considered. Each case study offers valuable information for other ...


Housing And Living Patterns Among Charleston's Free People Of Color In Wraggborough, 1796-1877, Katie Ann Stojsavljevic May 2007

Housing And Living Patterns Among Charleston's Free People Of Color In Wraggborough, 1796-1877, Katie Ann Stojsavljevic

All Theses

This thesis focuses on the living patterns of Charleston's antebellum free black population by examining spatial contexts, architectural styles, building materials, and the various socio-economic factors which influenced such patterns. Wraggborough, serving as a specific case study neighborhood, was selected based on its residential diversity in terms of both race and class. The timeline from 1796 to 1877 follows Wraggborough from its origins and subsequent development, into the enslavement crisis on the eve of the Civil War, through the Reconstruction era.


The "Dead House" At The Former Charleston Navy Base And Shipyard, Christopher Ohm May 2007

The "Dead House" At The Former Charleston Navy Base And Shipyard, Christopher Ohm

All Theses

Over the years a small brick building on the former Charleston Navy Base and Shipyard has been studied, yet still leaves many with unanswered questions. Much speculation has been made about its builder, and date of construction, but with little success. Many researchers cannot agree on the original use of this building, usually referred to as the 'Dead House.' Historical research pointed to many answers, but often led to almost insurmountable questions. This author's recent research has found several missing sites eliminating much confusion. Further research has led to explanations for many of the enigmatic aspects of this building ...


The Interpretation Of Comingtee Plantation, Kimberly C. Norton May 2007

The Interpretation Of Comingtee Plantation, Kimberly C. Norton

All Theses

This thesis provides a long term preservation plan for Comingtee Plantation, located at the confluence of the east and west branch of the Cooper River in Berkeley County, South Carolina. The plantation, owned by the Ball Family for almost two hundred years, includes the ruins of an eighteenth- century house, a nineteenth-century rice mill, as well as yet undiscovered archaeological resources. The site is owned by the Department of Natural Resources, a state agency, and is accessible to the public, though use is generally limited to hunting activities. During the summer of 2006 I participated in an internship project with ...


Campus Commuting: Barriers To Walking And Bicycling Use In A University Town, Benjamin Miller May 2007

Campus Commuting: Barriers To Walking And Bicycling Use In A University Town, Benjamin Miller

All Theses

Policy makers frequently express a desire to increase the use of non-motorized modes of transportation for commuting. However, walking and bicycling are only viable commuting modes if people live within acceptable distances of their destination and transportation networks can safely accommodate pedestrians or bicyclists. This research uses a combination of stated maximum-acceptable commute times for walking and bicycling and an assessment of the suitability of the transportation network to develop walking and bicycling commute catchments from which a person could be reasonably expected to commute to a destination by walking or bicycling. Identifying commute catchments such as these then allowed ...