Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Architecture Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Urban, Community and Regional Planning

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Faculty Publication Series

1986

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Architecture

Infrastructure Planning In Rural Massachusetts, John R. Mullin, Jeanne H. Armstrong, Meir Gross, Robert D. Yaro Jan 1986

Infrastructure Planning In Rural Massachusetts, John R. Mullin, Jeanne H. Armstrong, Meir Gross, Robert D. Yaro

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Faculty Publication Series

This paper describes the importance of understanding and dealing with the problems of infrastructure planning and maintenance in rural communities. Infrastructure is defined to include roads, bridges, water and wastewater collection and treatment systems, and public buildings and capital equipment. The authors base their findings primarily on the experience of communities in Massachusetts, but these findings are readily applied to the situation of rural communities elsewhere in the U.S.A. and other developed countries. Three major conclusions are presented in the paper: the need for rural communities to develop long-range plans for infrastructure maintenance and finance; the need to ...


From Mill Town To Mill Town: The Transition Of A New England Town From A Textile To A High-Technology Economy, John Mullin, Jeanne Armstrong, Jean Kavanagh Jan 1986

From Mill Town To Mill Town: The Transition Of A New England Town From A Textile To A High-Technology Economy, John Mullin, Jeanne Armstrong, Jean Kavanagh

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Faculty Publication Series

This article describes and analyzes the economic transformation of Maynard, Massachusetts. Located twenty-six miles west of Boston, Maynard was the home of the world's largest woolen mill. In 1950 the mill closed and 1,200 jobs were lost. During the next ten years, the town gradually recovered as the mill became the home of several innovative companies. Ultimately, the mill became the headquarters for the world's largest manufacturer of minicomputers. The circle is now complete: the mill is full and houses a company that claims a "world's largest" designation. The article analyses the rise and fall of ...