Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Architecture Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 20 of 20

Full-Text Articles in Architecture

Editor's Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens Jan 2017

Editor's Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens

Newport History

Following Newport’s mercantile decline in the nineteenth century, Newporters were drawn to careers at sea in the U.S. Navy. In this issue, Dr. Evelyn Cherpak relates the narrative of one such Newport native, Charles Hunter, who was living in Newport and on the retired list from the U.S. Navy, when Lincoln’s call for volunteers went out in the spring of 1861. Cherry Fletcher Bamberg’s account of finding Ezra Stiles’s eighteenth-century “Bills of Mortality for 1765-1777,” and her analysis of its usefulness in describing and understanding Newport’s pre-Revolutionary war population is our second article ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Dec 2013

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This special double issue of Newport History, produced to honor the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, presents seven texts previously published and all related to the French presence in Newport from 1778 to 1781. Editorial commentaries appear in the footnotes for each anthology text set off by square brackets and the tag "-ed." Brief biographies of authors also appear in this format at the start of the notes for individual articles. The name authority at the rear of this issue provides consistent information on the most commonly accepted spellings and life dates ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2013

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This issue of Newport History traverses the entire history of Newport. Elaine Robinson focuses on the Great Friends Meeting House, examining its evolution over the course of over three centuries and the complexities of its restoration in the twentieth century. Paul Hazard Harpin explores the exclusive Hazard’s and Gooseberry Beaches, documenting their ownership, usage, destruction, and rebirth amidst the ravages of coastal exposure


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2012

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This issue of Newport History continues the celebration of the Newport Historical Society’s one-hundredth year of publishing a journal focused on the history and culture of Newport County. Produced under the title Bulletin of the Newport Historical Society from1912 to 1963 in 112 issues, the journal has since 1964 continued under the title Newport History for an additional 155 issues, including the present number.

By the time he died on February 4, 1900, George Henry Norman had risen from ordinary beginnings as a student in Newport public schools to considerable wealth and modest fame. Along the way, he became ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2010

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

The plight of American prisoners held by the British in New York City during the Revolutionary War has been the topic over the years of several in-depth books and articles. In this issue of the journal, Christian McBurney provides the first extended study of the British treatment of prisoners on prison ships and in jails during the Newport occupation. This issue concludes with a spread of period photographs of the interior and grounds of the Edward King House, the largest and most lavish mansion in Newport before the Civil War. These photographs for the most part still hang on the ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2009

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This issue of Newport History is devoted to Conanicut Island, often called Jamestown after the name of its central village. At nine miles long and one mile wide, Conanicut is the second largest island in Narragansett Bay. The island became popular in the late nineteenth century among those disinclined to the Newport social whirl. They included Philadelphians, who built mansions in the Ocean Highlands and The Dumplings, and a group from St. Louis, who founded their own private enclave, Shoreby Hill. Co-authoring the lead article are Sue Maden and Rosemary Enright, who recount the story of William Lincoln Bates and ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2008

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This issue of Newport History includes three articles by local authors with diverse interests and backgrounds. They write respectively about a not-so-famous Newport architect, the now-defunct Jamestown Bridge, and a long-lost Newport estate with intriguing connections to ancient Egypt. The little-recognized Newport architect John Dixon Johnston is the subject of Ronald J. Onorato article. The pictorial essay devoted to the recently demolished Jamestown Bridge is written by Sue Madden, Rosemary Enright and Matt Kierstead. The last article is on the Newport estate of Theodore M. Davis by Jane Carey.


A Note From The Executive Director, Ruth S. Taylor Oct 2007

A Note From The Executive Director, Ruth S. Taylor

Newport History

No abstract provided.


Advertisements Apr 2007

Advertisements

Newport History

No abstract provided.


Issue Information Apr 2007

Issue Information

Newport History

No abstract provided.


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2006

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

The Naval Historical Collection, housed in the library of the Naval War College at Newport, is the main repository for documents relating to the naval history of Aquidneck Island. In this issue of Newport History, Evelyn M. Cherpak recounts the story of Newport’s Women Officers School by delving into five large photographic albums from this collection. Scholars studying the Old Stone Mill in Touro Park usually debate its controversial origins, but Marian Mathison Desrosiers here explores a different angle. Using wills, court cases, and other primary documents, she unravels the mill’s ownership by the Arnold, Pelham, and Banister ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2006

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

The French Naval presence in Newport at the time of the Revolutionary War was the subject of a special double issue of Newport History in 2003. Caroline Frank now revisits this topic with a fresh slant, examining the social and cultural implications of the relationship between a French officer and the daughter of a local Quaker family. Bertram Lippincott turns his attention to the philanthropic Mason sisters and their unusual Rhode Island Avenue cottage, designed in 1901 by architect Irving Gill in a Spanish Renaissance Revival style derived from California Missions. Paul F. Miller offers a second and last installment ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2005

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

Between 1830 and 1860, Newport became a favored summer haunt for moderately wealthy southerners, Bostonians, New Yorkers, and Philadelphians. Staying at first in boarding houses and hotels, and later in summerhouses termed “cottages,” these summer residents transformed the city from a sleepy, post-Revolutionary ruin into one of the leading resorts in America. The post-Civil War Gilded Age brought with it the “New York invasion” of unbridled wealth and aristocratic ambition, eclipsing this earlier summer society in the popular mind and replacing many of its cottages with palatial mansions. Eliza Cope Harrison and Rosemary F. Carroll return to antebellum Newport in ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2005

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

During the last decades of the nineteenth century, Newport had more than its fair share of remarkable personalities who shaped its unique literary, artistic, and social cultures. Maud Howe Elliott has until now been little recognized for her prominent role in all these areas. This issue of Newport History features an article by Nancy Whipple Grinnell that rectifies this oversight by charting Elliott's important role in the formation of the Art Association of Newport, predecessor to the Newport Art Museum. In the 1870s, the young architect Charles Follen McKim was another Newport habitué of particular note. This issue of ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2004

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This issue embraces women's history, architectural history, and military history-and encapsulates three distinct eras: Post-Revolutionary Newport, the nascent Gilded Age, and the two World Wars. Evelyn M. Cherpak's article in this issue is based upon her 2001 monograph published by the Newport Historical Society: A Diplomat's Lady in Brazil: Selections from the Diary of Mary Robinson Hunter, 1834-1848. Anthony Nicolosi’s article is on the naval history of Narragansett Bay. M. Joan Youngken presents the first of two installments on the photographic portfolio assembled in 1874 by Charles Follen McKim derives from her 1998 exhibition, Picturesque Localities ...


Editor’S Note, Ronald M. Potvin Apr 1998

Editor’S Note, Ronald M. Potvin

Newport History

In this issue of Newport History, Gary Scharnhorst examines Bret Harte, an elusive literary figure who made a brief but lasting impact on Newport society and letters. Harte established his reputation as a writer in California with western tales like "The Luck of Roaring Camp" and "The Heathen Chinee." He moved to Newport in 1871 in an attempt to remake himself into a "respectable" author and poet on the East Coast. One notable, though criticized, poem emerged from his tenure here: "A Newport Romance." In "On the Carbon-14 Analyses of Mortar from the Newport Tower: Theoretical Considerations," Andre J. De ...


Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin Apr 1998

Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin

Newport History

This special double issue of Newport History contains a complete description of the Society's collections, assembled for the first time in a single space. Joan Youngken, the Society's Deputy Director for Collections, contributed the sections on museum collections, and photographs and graphics collections; Bertram Lippincott III, the Society's Librarian, wrote about the library collections; and Ron M. Potvin, Curator of Library Special Collections, describes the Society's manuscripts and archives. The introduction was written by the Society's Executive Director, Daniel Snydacker. · This issue of Newport History is intended as a guide to the Society's collections ...


Editor's Note, Ronald M. Potvin Jul 1997

Editor's Note, Ronald M. Potvin

Newport History

When a mystery seems insoluble it is then that one must step back and examine the facts. This was the approach taken by the Committee for Research on Norse Activities in North America AD 1000-1500, an international group of scientists, historians, and archaeologists, who came to Newport in 1993 to study the “Newport Tower” or “Old Stone Mill”. This is also the approach of Johannes Hertz, from The Danish State Antiquary's Archaeological Secretariat, in his article, "Round Church or Windmill? New light on the Newport Tower," which presents the findings of the Committee for Norse Research, including the results ...


Colonel Hoppin’S Newport, Richard L. Champlin Jan 1986

Colonel Hoppin’S Newport, Richard L. Champlin

Newport History

After leading a life in the military, Col. Francis Hoppin became a leading architect whose work still stands in the city of Newport. Throughout the 1910s, Hoppin was commissioned by many looking to build property in the city. Some of his work include Sherwood on Bellevue Avenue, Armesa Hall, and a marble tablet in Trinity Church dedicated to Alfred G. Vanderbilt.


Book Review: The Rhode Island Atlas, Thomas Brennan Jan 1984

Book Review: The Rhode Island Atlas, Thomas Brennan

Newport History

Thomas Brennan, Newport Historical Society’s librarian, briefly reviews The Rhode Island Atlas, by Marion I. Wright and Robert J. Sullivan, published in 1982.