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Women

2007

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

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Indigenous Women And The Rciadic Part Ii, E Marchetti Jan 2007

Indigenous Women And The Rciadic Part Ii, E Marchetti

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In the previous issue of the Indigenous Law Bulletin, I discussed the extent to which the official reports of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody (‘RCIADIC’) addressed the problems of Indigenous women.1 I concluded that although the official RCIADIC reports did not completely ignore Indigenous women, they did not sufficiently discuss the topics that had the most harmful impact on Indigenous women, namely family violence and police treatment of Indigenous women.


Left Behind: Japan's Wartime Defeat And Stranded Women In Manchukuo, Rowena Ward Jan 2007

Left Behind: Japan's Wartime Defeat And Stranded Women In Manchukuo, Rowena Ward

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The zanryu fujin (stranded war wives) are former Japanese emigrants to Manchukuo who remained in China at the end of the Second World War. They were long among the forgotten legacies of Japan's imperialist past. The reasons why these women did not undergo repatriation during the years up to 1958, when large numbers of former colonial emigrants returned to Japan, are varied but in many cases, the 'Chinese' families that adopted them, or into which they married, played a part. The stories of survival during the period immediately after the entry of the Soviet Union into the Pacific War ...


Local Governance In Bangladesh: Towards A “Critical Mass” To Combat Discrimination Against Women With Special Reference To India, Afroza Begum Jan 2007

Local Governance In Bangladesh: Towards A “Critical Mass” To Combat Discrimination Against Women With Special Reference To India, Afroza Begum

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Women’s right to freedom from discrimination is the constitutionally entrenched fundamental right… and is repeatedly guaranteed in a series of legislation in Bangladesh. Bangladesh also assumes affirmative obligations to respect and ensure this right through ratifying over a dozen international human rights instruments. Despite that fact, discrimination persists in a pervasive form to deny women’s equal rights in legislative offices…, and women are unjustifiably deprived of their lawful rights and privileges….Legal initiatives and women’s activism across nations have forced to significant modifications in policies of political parties and laws to redress women’s meagre status in ...