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2019 - Japanese Pamphlets Inventory - Draft Feb 2019

2019 - Japanese Pamphlets Inventory - Draft

Japanese-American Pamphlet Inventory

An inventory of a series of pamphlets published from 1906 through 1925 focused on the presence of Japanese in America, the perception by some that Japan was taking steps to take over America, the great lengths gone to deprive Japanese residing in the United States of land either by purchase or lease and even citizenship, the depiction of Japanese as inferior humans in terms of intellect and morals standing, agreement and laws enacted to limit the ability of Japanese to participate in the economy, anti-Japanese organizations, speeches before various legislative bodies in opposition to the Japanese, Japanese responses to the ...


Name Changes In Search Of A New Identity: Southern And Eastern European Immigrants And The Fashioning Of White Identity In The United States, Kathryn A. Penick Jan 2019

Name Changes In Search Of A New Identity: Southern And Eastern European Immigrants And The Fashioning Of White Identity In The United States, Kathryn A. Penick

All Regis University Theses

This thesis examines the reasons, methods, and implications of the process by which immigrant individuals and families changed ethnic/heritage surnames to anglicized/Americanized surnames. Eastern and Southern immigrant groups are the focus of this work. Names have implications for group membership and personal identity; as a broad trend, the changing of family names was a significant way in which immigrant groups acculturated to mainstream American culture. In American history, immigration has been inextricably linked to issues of race and racial identity. These themes are explored in depth as they relate to personal and group identification and belonging.


Liminality Of The Japanese Empire: Border Crossings From Okinawa To Colonial Taiwan, Hiroko Matsuda Oct 2018

Liminality Of The Japanese Empire: Border Crossings From Okinawa To Colonial Taiwan, Hiroko Matsuda

UH Press Book Previews

Okinawa, one of the smallest prefectures of Japan, has drawn much international attention because of the long-standing presence of US bases and the people’s resistance against them. In recent years, alternative discourses on Okinawa have emerged due to the territorial disputes over the Senkaku Islands, and the media often characterizes Okinawa as the borderland demarcating Japan, China (PRC), and Taiwan (ROC). While many politicians and opinion makers discuss Okinawa’s national and security interests, little attention is paid to the local perspective toward the national border and local residents’ historical experiences of border crossings.

Through archival research and first-hand ...


Unpolished Emeralds In The Gem State: Hard-Rock Mining, Labor Unions, And Irish Nationalism In The Mountain West And Idaho, 1850-1900, Victor D. Higgins Aug 2017

Unpolished Emeralds In The Gem State: Hard-Rock Mining, Labor Unions, And Irish Nationalism In The Mountain West And Idaho, 1850-1900, Victor D. Higgins

Boise State University Theses and Dissertations

Irish immigration to the United States, extant since the 1600s, exponentially increased during the Irish Great Famine of 1845-52. For many Catholic Irish, the legacy of colonization and the Famine intensified an existing narrative of forced exile and dispossession. It also endowed them with a predisposition to identify similarities between colonial exploitation and capitalism. These factors fed a growing Irish nationalism on both sides of the Atlantic, protean in the 1700s, which reified in the 1800s, around Anglophobia. In the Mountain West where mining spearheaded exploration and settlement, the Irish made up the largest ethnic group in hard-rock mines in ...


A Charitable Scheme: William Smith, Michael Schlatter, And The German Free Schools, Daniel M. Crown May 2017

A Charitable Scheme: William Smith, Michael Schlatter, And The German Free Schools, Daniel M. Crown

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

This thesis describes William Smith’s development of “German Free Schools” in Pennsylvania between 1753-1755. It argues that these schools, ostensibly meant to acclimatize German immigrants to a British colony, were in fact intended to increase pro-Proprietary sympathy, isolate sectarian preachers, and end Quaker dominance over the Pennsylvania General Assembly.


Am I Not A Woman And A Sister And An Immigrant?: Approaching Intimate Partner Violence In Black Immigrant Communities Within An Intersectional Framework, Azzah Nasraddin Jan 2017

Am I Not A Woman And A Sister And An Immigrant?: Approaching Intimate Partner Violence In Black Immigrant Communities Within An Intersectional Framework, Azzah Nasraddin

Honors Theses at the University of Iowa

This Honors thesis presents a review of the literature on the magnitude and impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Black immigrant communities in the U.S. I argue that IPV must be approached within an intersectional framework in order to account for the ways in which multidimensional identities and experiences occur in conjunction with abuse. The intersectional identities of Black Immigrant Women (BIW); as Black, foreign, and woman, render them essentially invisible in U.S. immigration discourse and especially vulnerable to IPV due to multifaceted layers of oppression as well as specific cultural and religious implications. This thesis first ...


Anti-Muslim Sentiment In Developed Nations: A Comparative Study, Eman Bensreiti Jan 2017

Anti-Muslim Sentiment In Developed Nations: A Comparative Study, Eman Bensreiti

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper is a comparative study that aims to explore why anti-Muslims sentiment varies among 32 developed, democratic nations. I delve into the theory that the presence of more Muslims in developed nations leads to a higher anti-Muslim Sentiment. I also delve into the theory that a country with a poor state of economic well-being leads to a higher presence of anti-Muslim sentiment. Anti-Muslim sentiment can be measured numerous ways. A lot of previous research examines anti-Muslim sentiment in developed nations solely on the basis of public opinion polling. This paper will look at three different indicators of anti-Muslim sentiment ...


Immigrant And Irish Identities In Hand In The Fire And Hamilton's Writing Between 2003 And 2014, Dervila Cooke Dec 2016

Immigrant And Irish Identities In Hand In The Fire And Hamilton's Writing Between 2003 And 2014, Dervila Cooke

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article "Immigrant and Irish Identities in Hand in the Fire and Hamilton's Writing between 2003 and 2014" Dervila Cooke discusses the intertwining of Irish and immigrant identities. Cooke examines the connection between openness to memory and embracing migrant identities in Hamilton's writing both in the 2010 novel and as a whole. The empathetic and inclusive character of Helen in Hand in the Fire is analyzed in contrast to characters who have repressed memory including the Serbian Vid. Helen's ties to elsewhere, her openness to new influence, and her willingness to engage with traumatic elements of ...


Minor Transnational Writing In Ireland, Borbála Faragó Dec 2016

Minor Transnational Writing In Ireland, Borbála Faragó

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article "Minor Transnational Writing in Ireland" Borbála Faragó investigates the poetic work of some of Ireland's migrant writers through the lens of minor transnationalism. Ireland's peculiar migration history where there are two quite distinct groups of inward migrants, requires careful rethinking of terminology. Faragó proposes to circumnavigate the binary approach of investigating center versus periphery and instead look for lateral connections between marginalized groups. Reading the works of Ireland's internal others brings to the fore issues of authenticity, ethics, and identity that can foreground some of the ambiguities inherent in transnational studies today. Interpreting the ...


The Role Of Immigrants, Asylum Seekers, And Refugees In Confronting Maine’S Demographic Challenges, Robert W. Glover Jan 2016

The Role Of Immigrants, Asylum Seekers, And Refugees In Confronting Maine’S Demographic Challenges, Robert W. Glover

Maine Policy Review

The state of Maine currently faces a looming “demographic winter.” The state and its communities will struggle to maintain viable and vibrant communities in the decades to come due the current demographic situation, and will encounter a host of economic and political challenges as a result. Working to make Maine an attractive destination for immigrants, asylum seekers, and refugees must be at the forefront of efforts to address this challenge. This article lays out the difficult demographic situation that Maine currently faces and will face in the years to come and articulates why, more than ever, fostering greater diversity in ...


The Unwanted Immigrant, Frank A. Bozich Iii Jan 2016

The Unwanted Immigrant, Frank A. Bozich Iii

Senior Honors Projects, 2010-current

The social and religious differences between Chinese migrants and Americans of European descent played a large role in the exploitation of the Chinese. Ultimately, nativism became ingrained in Californian society as Irish Americans began to view Chinese as a threat to their economic success and violence toward Chinese became more common due to the Californian government’s support of anti-Chinese and nativist legislation.


The Role Of Education In The Assimilation Of Romani Women In The United States, Melanie Covert Dec 2015

The Role Of Education In The Assimilation Of Romani Women In The United States, Melanie Covert

Sociology Theses

The Romani are a largely unknown people group in the United States though their plight world-wide is highly visible. The story of Romani in the United States remains largely untold. This study explored the daily lives of 15 Romani women within the United States. The study investigated questions of historical prejudice, gender roles, educational achievement and barriers to assimilation with in the Romani community. Results of the study highlighted that many Romani women encounter significant barriers inside and outside of their communities that impact their ability to pursue higher education and to fully assimilate into mainstream society due to current ...


Bridging Bisexual Erasure In Lgbt-Rights Discourse And Litigation, Nancy C. Marcus Dec 2015

Bridging Bisexual Erasure In Lgbt-Rights Discourse And Litigation, Nancy C. Marcus

Michigan Journal of Gender and Law

LGBT rights are at the forefront of current legal news, with “gay marriage” and other “gay” issues visible beyond dispute in social and legal discourse in the 21st Century. Less visible are the bisexuals who are supposedly encompassed by the umbrella phrase “LGBT” and by LGBT-rights litigation, but who are often left out of LGBTrights discourse entirely. This Article examines the problem of bisexual invisibility and erasure within LGBT-rights litigation and legal discourse. The Article surveys the bisexual erasure legal discourse to date, and examines the causes of bisexual erasure and its harmful consequences for bisexuals, the broader LGBT community ...


Irish Women's Immigration To The United States After The Potato Famine, 1860-1900, Mackenzie S. Flanagan May 2015

Irish Women's Immigration To The United States After The Potato Famine, 1860-1900, Mackenzie S. Flanagan

Senior Theses and Capstone Projects

Thousands of single Irish women emigrated to the United States after the Great Potato Famine. These women left Ireland because social conditions in Ireland limited their opportunities for fulfilling lives. Changes in marriage and inheritance patterns lowered the status of unmarried women and made marriage increasingly unlikely. As a result, many women emigrated to the United States and, once here, worked, used their wages to help others emigrate, and most eventually married. Irish culture facilitated this mass migration by promoting the autonomy of single women yet limiting their options. Emigration did not signify a break with their Irish culture and ...


Elusive Equality: Reflections On Justice Field’S Opinions In Chae Chan Ping And Fong Yue Ting, Victor C. Romero Jan 2015

Elusive Equality: Reflections On Justice Field’S Opinions In Chae Chan Ping And Fong Yue Ting, Victor C. Romero

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Elusive Equality: Reflections On Justice Field’S Opinions In Chae Chan Ping And Fong Yue Ting, Victor C. Romero Jan 2015

Elusive Equality: Reflections On Justice Field’S Opinions In Chae Chan Ping And Fong Yue Ting, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

For immigration scholars, Justice Field is perhaps best remembered for his majority opinion in Chae Chan Ping v. United States, the Supreme Court’s decision upholding Chinese exclusion, and credited for introducing the plenary power doctrine to immigration law. Yet, despite the opinion’s xenophobic rhetoric reflecting his personal views of the Chinese, Justice Field dissented in Fong Yue Ting v. United States, reasoning that, once they became lawful residents, the Chinese were entitled to be treated as equals under the law regardless of citizenship, a position supported by his earlier federal circuit court opinion in Ho Ah Kow v ...


Elusive Equality: Reflections On Justice Field’S Opinions In Chae Chan Ping And Fong Yue Ting, Victor C. Romero Dec 2014

Elusive Equality: Reflections On Justice Field’S Opinions In Chae Chan Ping And Fong Yue Ting, Victor C. Romero

Victor C. Romero

For immigration scholars, Justice Field is perhaps best remembered for his majority opinion in Chae Chan Ping v. United States, the Supreme Court’s decision upholding Chinese exclusion, and credited for introducing the plenary power doctrine to immigration law. Yet, despite the opinion’s xenophobic rhetoric reflecting his personal views of the Chinese, Justice Field dissented in Fong Yue Ting v. United States, reasoning that, once they became lawful residents, the Chinese were entitled to be treated as equals under the law regardless of citizenship, a position supported by his earlier federal circuit court opinion in Ho Ah Kow v ...


The Myth Of The White Minority, Andrew Pierce Dec 2014

The Myth Of The White Minority, Andrew Pierce

Andrew J. Pierce

In recent years, and especially in the wake of Barack Obama’s reelection, projections that whites will soon become a minority have proliferated. In this essay, I will argue that such predictions are misleading at best, as they rest on questionable philosophical presuppositions, including the presupposition that racial concepts like ‘whiteness’ are static and unchanging rather than fluid and continually being reconstructed. If I am right about these fundamental inaccuracies, one must wonder why the myth of the white minority persists. I will argue that by re-envisioning whites as a minority culture struggling against a hostile dominant group, and by ...


Assessing The Velocity, Scale, Volume, Intensity And “Creedal Congruence” Of Immigrants In Setting A Nation’S Admissions Policy, David Barnhizer Dec 2014

Assessing The Velocity, Scale, Volume, Intensity And “Creedal Congruence” Of Immigrants In Setting A Nation’S Admissions Policy, David Barnhizer

David Barnhizer

Table of Contents Death of the “Melting Pot” The Rejection of Assimilation and the Rise of “Identity Sects” Western Europe and the US Face Significant Challenges to Their Creeds and Cultures The Radicalizing Search for Identity and Meaning The Velocity, Scale and Difference of Migrant Entry Into Dissimilar Cultures Assimilation Is Not Easy Under the Best of Circumstances ISIS, al-Qaeda and The Old Man of the Mountain What Are the Creedal Values For Which Western Nations Should Expect Commitment from Immigrants and Citizens? “Warning! Do Not Approach!” Beyond Non-Assimilation to Cultural Transformation The Right to Preserve a “Cultural Ecosystem” The ...


U.S. Immigration: The Origins And Evolution Of Contemporary Issues And The Architecture Of Future Reform, Andrew Beaule Jun 2014

U.S. Immigration: The Origins And Evolution Of Contemporary Issues And The Architecture Of Future Reform, Andrew Beaule

Honors Theses

In 1965, the United States Congress passed the Immigration and Nationality Act, attempting to remove racial, religious, and cultural discrimination from the immigration system. However, the infamous act and subsequent legislation have caused unintended consequences. Illegal immigration has skyrocketed despite a massive increase in border enforcement; and Central Americans, particularly Mexicans, have become the target of racial and cultural discrimination, much like the Southern European immigrants of the early 1900s. The current immigration system still relies on the framework passed nearly 50 years ago, proving to be insufficient for contemporary United States. This thesis investigates the historical patterns in immigration ...


History Repeats Itself: Parallels Between Current-Day Threats To Immigrant Parental Rights And Native American Parental Rights In The Twentieth Century, Vinita B. Andrapalliyal Apr 2014

History Repeats Itself: Parallels Between Current-Day Threats To Immigrant Parental Rights And Native American Parental Rights In The Twentieth Century, Vinita B. Andrapalliyal

University of Massachusetts Law Review

Immigrant parents are currently burdened with unique risks to their parental rights, risks that bear little relation to their ability to care for their children. Recent developments in family and immigration law, historical cultural prejudices against non-Western parenting traditions, and poor immigrants’ limited access to the U.S. legal system are largely to blame. This Note explores the inadequacies in our legal system contributing to the struggles of immigrant parents to maintain family unity and connects the current situation to the disproportionate number of terminations of parental rights within the Native American community in the mid-twentieth century. It suggests that ...


Race And Immigration, Then And Now: How The Shift To "Worthiness" Undermines The 1965 Immigration Law's Civil Rights Goals, Elizabeth Keyes Apr 2014

Race And Immigration, Then And Now: How The Shift To "Worthiness" Undermines The 1965 Immigration Law's Civil Rights Goals, Elizabeth Keyes

All Faculty Scholarship

This essay looks at how far immigration reform has come from the explicit civil rights character of the 1965 immigration law that reshaped America. The optimism surrounding that law’s dismantling of national-origins barriers to immigration proved to be overstated in the intervening decades, as the factors determining an immigrant’s “worth and qualifications” too often became proxies for race. After briefly looking at work done by critical race theorists tracing some of ways race and immigration have long intersected in immigration legal history, the article closely examines modern-day immigration reform proposals, particularly the Senate bill that remains the most ...


"A Tempestuous Voyage At Sea And A Fatiguing One By Land": Ulsterwomen In Philadelphia, 1783-1812, Sarah V. Riblet Mar 2014

"A Tempestuous Voyage At Sea And A Fatiguing One By Land": Ulsterwomen In Philadelphia, 1783-1812, Sarah V. Riblet

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

This thesis examines the lives of women who came from the north of Ireland, the area traditionally known as Ulster, and settled in the city of Philadelphia between the end of the American Revolution and the beginning of the War of 1812, when economic strife and political rebellion within Ireland impelled many to emigrate. In so doing, this work aims to augment the historical record on a group of people and a period of time that have received relatively little attention, as most scholars have heretofore focused on the experiences of male Irish immigrants during either the period of North ...


The Circular Flow: Return Migration From The United States In The Early 1900s, Zachary A. Ward Jan 2014

The Circular Flow: Return Migration From The United States In The Early 1900s, Zachary A. Ward

Economics Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Many migrants return back to their home country after a short period of stay. Often these migrants are returning to poorer countries, which is at odds with a simple economic model where individuals maximize lifetime earnings. In this dissertation, I explore the motivations for return migration in the early 1900s, the only time in United States history when the government recorded those leaving the country.

In the first paper, we estimate the effect of the 1920s immigration quotas on (1) out-migration rates, (2) emigration across skill groups, and (3) the duration of temporary migrants' stays in the U.S. Higher ...


“The Frontier Thesis In Transnational Migration: The U.S. West In The Making Of Italy Abroad,” In Immigrants In The Far West: Historical Identities And Experiences, Edited By Jessie L. Embry And Brian Q. Cannon (Salt Lake City: University Of Utah Press, 2014), 363-381., Mark I. Choate Jan 2014

“The Frontier Thesis In Transnational Migration: The U.S. West In The Making Of Italy Abroad,” In Immigrants In The Far West: Historical Identities And Experiences, Edited By Jessie L. Embry And Brian Q. Cannon (Salt Lake City: University Of Utah Press, 2014), 363-381., Mark I. Choate

All Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


War In The Countryside: Re-Examining Life In The Netherlands During World War Ii Through The Memories Of Dutch Immigrants To Ontario, Adam Roffel Jan 2014

War In The Countryside: Re-Examining Life In The Netherlands During World War Ii Through The Memories Of Dutch Immigrants To Ontario, Adam Roffel

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The History of the Netherlands during World War Two paints a one sided view of what war was like. While urban life receives lots of attention in English literature, rural life is often neglected. Through the stories of six individuals who immigrated to Canada in the decade following World War Two, a separate wartime experience will be examined and discussed.


Deutschland Unsere Mutter, Columbia Our Bride: German-America In The Progressive Era, Taylor Holmes Mar 2013

Deutschland Unsere Mutter, Columbia Our Bride: German-America In The Progressive Era, Taylor Holmes

Pursuit - The Journal of Undergraduate Research at the University of Tennessee

In many histories of American involvement in the First World War, the anti-German hysteria that exploded in the United States is often trivially attributed to the reality that America had declared war on Germany and the consequent propaganda the war effort generated. This, however, overlooks the significant presence of anti-German sentiment prior both to the outbreak of the First World War and American entry into the war. Precedent to and coincident with U.S. military intervention in Europe was the domestic cultural struggle between an ascendant and dominantly Anglo-American Progressive ideology and a cultural pluralism that German-American ethnic pride embodied ...


New Forms Of Exclusion And Manifestations Of Racism In Barack Obama’S Rhetoric Of Immigration Reform, Svilen Veselinov Trifonov Jan 2013

New Forms Of Exclusion And Manifestations Of Racism In Barack Obama’S Rhetoric Of Immigration Reform, Svilen Veselinov Trifonov

Communication Graduate Theses & Dissertations

In this master's thesis I situate President Barack Obama's 2011 speech on comprehensive immigration reform as representative of a larger body of immigration reform rhetoric and driving force behind current efforts to pass new legislation. I argue that the President's rhetoric served to conceal a commitment to protect the economic interests of hegemonic whiteness that dominate in contemporary U.S. American society. In the different chapters of this thesis I interrogate rhetorical strategies that served to silence questions of racial segregation, racisms, and even race altogether. I examine and challenge President Obama's ideological subscription to neoliberal ...


On Becoming "Citizen": The Rhetorical Work Of "Immigrancy" In American National Fantasy, Meryl Jeannette Irwin Dec 2012

On Becoming "Citizen": The Rhetorical Work Of "Immigrancy" In American National Fantasy, Meryl Jeannette Irwin

Theses and Dissertations

The decade of the 2000s witnessed a series of events that challenged traditional notions of America as an "exceptional" nation, one that had withstood or escaped the crises that toppled other global forces until the United States remained the final superpower. These ten years opened with a presidential election decided not by the Electoral College but by the Supreme Court, advanced through terrorist attacks on home soil and the devastating ramifications of military, policy, and moral reevaluation in their wake, to reach a close in the worst failure of capitalism since the Great Depression. Newly identified terror networks "hated" the ...


Beyond Saints And Sinners: Discretion And The Need For New Narratives In The U.S. Immigration System, Elizabeth Keyes Jan 2012

Beyond Saints And Sinners: Discretion And The Need For New Narratives In The U.S. Immigration System, Elizabeth Keyes

All Faculty Scholarship

Beyond Saints and Sinners examines the forces affecting the exercise of discretion in American immigration courts, and argues that in this present age of immigration anxiety, the same facts that place an individual in deportation proceedings may constitute the reasons a judge will, relying on discretion, deny them relief for which they are otherwise eligible. The article explores the polarized narratives told about "good" and "bad" immigrants, the exceptionally difficult task of adjudicating in overburdened immigration courts, and the ways in which these polarized narratives interact with psychological short-cuts, or heuristics, that affect judicial exercises of discretion. After engaging in ...