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Emily Dickinson's Funeral And The Paradox Of Literary Fame, Paul Crumbley Nov 2017

Emily Dickinson's Funeral And The Paradox Of Literary Fame, Paul Crumbley

English Faculty Publications

In the months preceding her death on May 15, 1886, Emily Dickinson requested that Emily Brontë's poem "No coward soul is mine" be read at her funeral, thereby enlisting Brontë's defiant declaration of immortality in what can be interpreted as Dickinson's own equally defiant final statement on the relation of fame to enduring art. Dickinson expressed the logic behind this request four years earlier in an 1882 letter to Roberts Brothers editor Thomas Niles in which she refused his request for a "volume of poems" (L749b) and instead sent him "How happy is the little Stone" (Fr1570E ...


A Study In The Humor Of The Old Northeast: Joseph C. Neal's Charcoal Sketches And The Comic Urban Frontier Studies In American Humor, David E.E. Sloane Jan 2017

A Study In The Humor Of The Old Northeast: Joseph C. Neal's Charcoal Sketches And The Comic Urban Frontier Studies In American Humor, David E.E. Sloane

English Faculty Publications

Joseph C. Neal pioneered the urban frontier of the Old Northeast in depicting what he called "hard cases" from the Philadelphia slums in the long-overlooked Charcoal Sketches, first published in book form in 1838. His characters' inability to change with the times, their false and vulnerable toughness, and their urban vernacular language look forward to the humor of Mark Twain, political commentators, and radio and TV sitcoms. In Neal's work, the cash economy, the lightly ironic euphuistic character study, and metaphors of the city are used to describe the new social and ethical paradoxes of the urban-industrial world already ...