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The Pernicious Prophecy Of Diminished Academic Expectations, Stephen C. Foggatt Dec 2017

The Pernicious Prophecy Of Diminished Academic Expectations, Stephen C. Foggatt

Dissertations

An ABSTRACT of the DISSERTATION of: Stephen C. Foggatt, for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Curriculum and Instruction, presented on November 3, 2017, at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. TITLE: The Pernicious Prophecy of Diminished Academic Expectations MAJOR PROFESSOR: Dr. D. John McIntyre This study examines the relationship between academic expectations and achievement, particularly as it concerns minority students. I have often been troubled by the narrative surrounding the academic potential of minority students in America, and my research is intended to broaden the discussion of this issue by presenting a chronicle of thoughts collected from individuals who have ...


Building Blocks Of A National Style: An Examination Of Topics And Gestures In Nineteenth-Century American Music As Exemplified In Scott Joplin’S Treemonisha, Elisabet Omarene De Vallee Aug 2017

Building Blocks Of A National Style: An Examination Of Topics And Gestures In Nineteenth-Century American Music As Exemplified In Scott Joplin’S Treemonisha, Elisabet Omarene De Vallee

Dissertations

Even though America’s musical elite undertook a veritable boycott of American talent during the nineteenth century, efforts to define concert life along Germanic lines did not prevent the development of a distinctly American sound. The groundwork was laid in the first half of the century in folk songs, national airs, and popular tunes from minstrel shows. It came to fruition after the Civil War, and by the 1920s, all of the elements were in place for an easily recognizable “American Style.” The development of musical topics to evoke the idea of “American” was essential in establishing this style. Most ...


Experiences Of Students Utilizing A Campus Food Pantry, Daugherty Jamie Jul 2017

Experiences Of Students Utilizing A Campus Food Pantry, Daugherty Jamie

Dissertations

Food insecurity is a phenomenon with far-reaching impacts on the social, economic, health, and well-being of college students’ lives impacting how they procure food, food choices, and food experiences. A qualitative narrative inquiry explored experiences of three students facing food insecurity and using a campus food pantry. Data collection methods included in-depth semi-structured interviews, journaling, and photo elicitation. Data analysis illustrated five themes: a) financial challenge identification; b) strategizing budget priorities; c) prioritizing health; d) food pantry uses and strategies; and e) having enough. Students’ experiences were impacted by social and physical implications due to their financial challenges. The food ...


Sacred Harp Singing In Europe: Its Pathways, Spaces, And Meanings, Ellen Lueck May 2017

Sacred Harp Singing In Europe: Its Pathways, Spaces, And Meanings, Ellen Lueck

Dissertations

Sacred Harp singing—a printed form of a cappella sacred music developed by 18th, 19th, and 20th century Americans for the purpose of worship and social networking—has experienced significant participatory growth in the past eight years, with new community groups formed in twenty countries world-wide. The majority of Sacred Harp singing’s transnational spread has concentrated in Europe.

Several factors have encouraged the flourishing of European participation both at the local level and within the international Sacred Harp singing network. These factors include strong international support from traditional Sacred Harp organizations in the U.S. Another factor has been ...


Un-Othering The Albino: How Popular Communication Constructs Albinism Identity, Niya P. Miller May 2017

Un-Othering The Albino: How Popular Communication Constructs Albinism Identity, Niya P. Miller

Dissertations

This study examines the rhetoric of whiteness framing albinism in the general public. It is argued that the albinic body is a unique space from which the typical coding of race, and the very act of difference making can be deconstructed. This analysis brings into focus observations about how whiteness operates rhetorically and ideologically in popular discourse to create negative verbal and visual trope of albinism, called the albino trope. Through the albino trope, White privilege maintains its invisible rhetorical silence. By examining the complexities that arise when albinism is communicated about in the general public, we gain more insight ...


Being And Beholding: Comparative Analysis Of Joy And Awe In Four Cultures, Daria B. White May 2017

Being And Beholding: Comparative Analysis Of Joy And Awe In Four Cultures, Daria B. White

Dissertations

The emotions of joy and awe have received some attention in the psychological literature with few studies comparing the two phenomena across cultures. A phenomenological study of joy and awe in four countries – Bulgaria, Greece, Turkey, and the USA, examined both emotions. The inquiry was conducted through semi-structured interviews. The phenomenological methodology was supplemented with grounded theory procedures to ensure research rigor. Four categories were identified that contribute to the experience of joy and awe: unity of souls, nature, spirituality, and the original self. Freedom, humor, face-to-face communication, innocence, time, and space were facets of the joy and awe experience ...


Forgetting How To Hate: The Evolution Of White Responses To Integration In Chicago, 1946-1987, Chris Ramsey Jan 2017

Forgetting How To Hate: The Evolution Of White Responses To Integration In Chicago, 1946-1987, Chris Ramsey

Dissertations

After the Supreme Court made restrictive covenants illegal in 1948, violence became the default response for numerous white communities across the South Side of Chicago when African Americans moved into €“ or just passed through €“ their neighborhoods. The civil rights movement's high-profile successes in the first half of the 1960s and the media attention Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s open housing marches on the Southwest Side of Chicago brought to segregation in the urban North made brute force unacceptable to the public at-large. White ethnic residents on Chicago's Southwest Side realized they could no longer resort to violent ...