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A Reformers' Union: Land Reform, Labor, And The Evolution Of Antislavery Politics, 1790–1860, Sean G. Griffin Feb 2017

A Reformers' Union: Land Reform, Labor, And The Evolution Of Antislavery Politics, 1790–1860, Sean G. Griffin

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

“A Reformers’ Union: Land Reform, Labor, and the Evolution of Antislavery Politics, 1790–1860” offers a critical revision of the existing literature on both the early labor and antislavery movements by examining the ideologies and organizational approaches that labor reformers and abolitionists used to challenge both the expansion of slavery and the spread of market relationships. Extending the timeframe of the antislavery and labor movements backwards to the 1790s, this dissertation situates the origins of the pre-Civil War labor movement in republican ideology and currents of transatlantic radical thought, and traces the rise of agrarian and communitarian labor reform against ...


Classes For Order: The Origins Of Inequality In American Education, Kathleen Rose King Jan 2017

Classes For Order: The Origins Of Inequality In American Education, Kathleen Rose King

History Graduate Theses & Dissertations

If speaking of universal public education is problematic in the United States today, historically it was even more so. This work explores how regional attributes affected and were reflected in American schooling regimes from the colonial era through the end of the nineteenth century. Throughout, America’s governing classes strategically molded schools to promote social stability and political order in their communities. Colonists in ethnically homogeneous New England built schools and created school systems to reinforce communal norms; leaders in the heterogeneous Middle Colonies supported schools but not unifying systems, while the Southern planter gentry rejected schools as dangerous, destabilizing ...