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Sacrificing Our Daughters: Changing Perceptions Of Prostitution In Iowa, 1880-1915, Hope C. Mitchell Jun 2017

Sacrificing Our Daughters: Changing Perceptions Of Prostitution In Iowa, 1880-1915, Hope C. Mitchell

Hope Mitchell

In response to the urbanization and industrialization that occurred throughout the nineteenth century, people across the country began to reevaluate their perceptions of prostitution during the later part of the nineteenth century and into the early part of the twentieth century. As young women began to migrate to cities looking for factory and domestic work, parents became concerned by the dangers that their daughters would face in the city. This concern was especially felt within the Midwest, where farm families were heavily dependent upon the labors of their daughters. As they transitioned into the later part of the nineteenth century ...


"The Church Or The Wheel?" Religious Institutions Respond To The American Bicycle Boom, Christopher A. Sweet Dec 2016

"The Church Or The Wheel?" Religious Institutions Respond To The American Bicycle Boom, Christopher A. Sweet

Christopher A. Sweet

“These bladder-wheel bicycles are diabolical devices of the demon of darkness.” Thus railed a Baltimore preacher against the massive wave of popularity for the safety bicycle in the mid-1890s. From a 21st century perspective it seems quaint that American religious institutions felt threatened by something so mundane as bicycles. At the time though, easy-to-ride and relatively cheap safety bicycles presented a direct challenge to many established cultural and social norms. Women cyclists gained independent mobility and were able to press for dress reform. Physical health became a priority for city-dwellers. Christian churches and pastors primarily criticized the bicycle for encouraging ...