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Volunteer Women: Militarized Femininity In The 1916 Easter Rising, Sasha Conaway May 2019

Volunteer Women: Militarized Femininity In The 1916 Easter Rising, Sasha Conaway

War and Society (MA) Theses

Women were an integral part to the Easter Rising, yet until recently, their contributions have been forgotten. Those who have been remembered are often women who bucked conservative Irish society’s notions of femininity and chose to actively participate in combat, which has led to a skewed narrative that favors their contributions over the contributions of other women. Historians and scholars favor these narratives because they are empowering and act as clear foils to the heroic narratives of the male leaders in the Easter Rising. In reality, however, most of the women who joined Cumann na mBan or worked for ...


The Traveler's Aid Society: Moral Reform And Social Work In New York City, 1907-1916, Eric C. Cimino Ph.D. Jan 2019

The Traveler's Aid Society: Moral Reform And Social Work In New York City, 1907-1916, Eric C. Cimino Ph.D.

Eric C. Cimino

The prominent philanthropist, Grace Hoadley Dodge, founded the Travelers' Aid Society as a response to the moral and sexual dangers that she believed confronted single women (immigrant and native-born) as they entered American cities in search of work and leisure. Moral reformers like Dodge assumed that traveling women who were adrift from their family and community existed on the “border line of tragedy,” where the slightest misstep could result in a downward spiral that culminated in white slavery, the coerced prostitution of white women. To prevent the tragedy of white slavery, the Travelers' Aid Society provided social work to at-risk ...


Defying Civility: Female Writers And Educators In Nineteenth-Century America, Tess Evans May 2017

Defying Civility: Female Writers And Educators In Nineteenth-Century America, Tess Evans

Masters Theses

This thesis project investigates how northern American women in the nineteenth-century defied civility and what the consequences were. Primary and secondary source research of poetry, prose, letters, government documents, and personal accounts reveal that these women were able to step out of the domestic sphere to create a new world for themselves without the aid of males. This paper and accompanying online exhibit, Civil War Successes, explores how defying the notions of a civil woman paved the way for an earlier women’s movement than the twentieth-century. A nation torn apart by civil war saw women creating outlets for their ...


The Traveler's Aid Society: Moral Reform And Social Work In New York City, 1907-1916, Eric C. Cimino Ph.D. Jan 2016

The Traveler's Aid Society: Moral Reform And Social Work In New York City, 1907-1916, Eric C. Cimino Ph.D.

Faculty Works: History and Political Science

The prominent philanthropist, Grace Hoadley Dodge, founded the Travelers' Aid Society as a response to the moral and sexual dangers that she believed confronted single women (immigrant and native-born) as they entered American cities in search of work and leisure. Moral reformers like Dodge assumed that traveling women who were adrift from their family and community existed on the “border line of tragedy,” where the slightest misstep could result in a downward spiral that culminated in white slavery, the coerced prostitution of white women. To prevent the tragedy of white slavery, the Travelers' Aid Society provided social work to at-risk ...


From England's Bridewell To America's Brides: Imprisoned Women, Shakespeare's Measure For Measure, And Empire, Alicia Meyer Apr 2015

From England's Bridewell To America's Brides: Imprisoned Women, Shakespeare's Measure For Measure, And Empire, Alicia Meyer

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

This thesis examines the experience of largely single women in London’s house of correction, Bridewell Prison, and argues that Bridewell’s prisoners, and the nature of their crimes, reveal the state’s desire for dependent, sexually controlled, yet ultimately productive women. Scholars have largely neglected the place of early modern women’s imprisonment despite its pervasive presence in the everyday lives of common English women. By examining the historical and cultural implications of early modern women and prison, this thesis contends that women’s prisons were more than simply establishments of punishment and reform. A closer examination of Bridewell ...


Moved By The Spirit: Evangelical Presbyterian Woman In The Early Modern Atlantic World, Chasity Dominique Hunt Jan 2015

Moved By The Spirit: Evangelical Presbyterian Woman In The Early Modern Atlantic World, Chasity Dominique Hunt

Online Theses and Dissertations

Revivalism existed as a cultural feature within Scottish Presbyterian society decades before the famous transatlantic revivals of the eighteenth-century. Although many aspects of those revivals have been examined, such as the Holy Fairs, historians and scholars have largely overlooked the extensive body of memoirs and accounts featuring Scottish Presbyterian women in Scotland and the greater Atlantic world, and their experiences within these revivals. This study seeks to uncover the relationship of those women to evangelicalism and revivalism as it exists as a cultural event embedded with symbols. In order to accomplish that goal, this paper looks at the history of ...


Bet Lee: An American Civil War Novella, Tamara J. Lafountain Jun 2014

Bet Lee: An American Civil War Novella, Tamara J. Lafountain

MAIS Projects and Theses

An estimated 400 women disguised themselves as men to fight in the American Civil War. Though the war ended nearly 150 years ago and over 65,000 books have covered every aspect of the subject in that time, only a handful of recent works have explored the subject of the female civil war soldier. The vast majority of these women lived in secret; and, since secrets kept are difficult to research, it is likely that the published historical studies on the subject have found all that can be discovered (Leonard, 1999; Cooke and Blanton, 2002; Hall, 2006). This novella takes ...


Kathleen Clarke: Connecting The Competing Definitions Of Women's Identity In Irish Nationalism, Kathleen Reilly May 2014

Kathleen Clarke: Connecting The Competing Definitions Of Women's Identity In Irish Nationalism, Kathleen Reilly

Honors Theses

The modern nationalist movement (1916-1936) presented a contradiction for Irish women. On the one hand, they were being called to perform their responsibilities as citizens by extending their patriotism outside the home and taking a more active role in the fate of their country. On the other, Irish nationalism relied heavily on tradition; women were generally seen as the keepers of that tradition. Nationalist women struggled to respond to the competing responsibilities of their traditional domestic role and the emerging roles as citizens in a new nation.

This paper examines Kathleen Clarke as a case study in how nationalist Irishwomen ...


"A Tempestuous Voyage At Sea And A Fatiguing One By Land": Ulsterwomen In Philadelphia, 1783-1812, Sarah V. Riblet Mar 2014

"A Tempestuous Voyage At Sea And A Fatiguing One By Land": Ulsterwomen In Philadelphia, 1783-1812, Sarah V. Riblet

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

This thesis examines the lives of women who came from the north of Ireland, the area traditionally known as Ulster, and settled in the city of Philadelphia between the end of the American Revolution and the beginning of the War of 1812, when economic strife and political rebellion within Ireland impelled many to emigrate. In so doing, this work aims to augment the historical record on a group of people and a period of time that have received relatively little attention, as most scholars have heretofore focused on the experiences of male Irish immigrants during either the period of North ...


The Temperance Worker As Social Reformer And Ethnographer As Exemplified In The Life And Work Of Jessie A. Ackermann., Margaret Shipley Carr Aug 2009

The Temperance Worker As Social Reformer And Ethnographer As Exemplified In The Life And Work Of Jessie A. Ackermann., Margaret Shipley Carr

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This project used primary historical documents from the Jessie A. Ackermann collection at ETSU's Archives of Appalachia, other books and documents from the temperance period, and recent scholarship on the subjects of temperance, suffrage, and women travelers and civilizers. As the second world missionary for the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Ackermann traveled in order to establish WCT Unions and worked as a civilizer, feminist, and reporter of the conditions of women and the disadvantaged throughout the world.


Claremont Cameos: Women Teachers And The Building Of Social Capital In Australia, Lynne Hunt, Janina Trotman Jan 2002

Claremont Cameos: Women Teachers And The Building Of Social Capital In Australia, Lynne Hunt, Janina Trotman

ECU Publications Pre. 2011

The centenary of Edith Cowan University is a significant event in the history of Western Australia: it celebrates the opening of the State's first tertiary institution, Claremont Teachers' College, in 1902. Being a primary teachers' college, most of its students were young women. This book, Claremont Cameos, tells their story. It is a storyline that stretches from the 'Stolen Generation' of Aboriginal children to Freud; it touches on the discovery of rare orchids and recounts the development of a fashion empire. Environmentalism, feminism, discrimination, resistance and commitment form part of the fabric of the book. The women's stories ...


New Jersey Women And Their Strategies For Exerting Power In Marriage, 1770-1800, Jacqueline Deyo May 2001

New Jersey Women And Their Strategies For Exerting Power In Marriage, 1770-1800, Jacqueline Deyo

Honors Theses

No abstract provided.


Pennsylvania Folklife Vol. 46, No. 1, Jean-Paul Benowitz, John Lowry Ruth, Paula T. Hradkowsky, Monica Mutzbauer Oct 1996

Pennsylvania Folklife Vol. 46, No. 1, Jean-Paul Benowitz, John Lowry Ruth, Paula T. Hradkowsky, Monica Mutzbauer

Pennsylvania Folklife Magazine

• The Mennonites of Pennsylvania: A House Divided
• "Not Only Tradition, but Truth": Legend and Myth Fragments Among Pennsylvania Mennonites
• Mennonite Women and Centuries of Change in America
• "It is Painful to Say Goodbye": A Mennonite Family in Europe and America


Pennsylvania Folklife Vol. 21, No. 1, Earl F. Robacker, Eleanor Fein Reishtein, Ronald L. Michael, C. Frances Berman, Maurice A. Mook, Don Yoder Oct 1971

Pennsylvania Folklife Vol. 21, No. 1, Earl F. Robacker, Eleanor Fein Reishtein, Ronald L. Michael, C. Frances Berman, Maurice A. Mook, Don Yoder

Pennsylvania Folklife Magazine

• The Fraktur of Monroe County
• Minutes of the West Grove Housekeepers Association as Source Material for Folklife Studies
• The Searight Tavern on the National Road: An Archaeological Study
• The "Brown Sugar" Game in Western Pennsylvania
• Bread Baking in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania: Commentary for the Documentary Film in the "Encyclopaedia Cinematographica"
• Notes and Documents: Literature for the Allegheny Frontier: The Huntingdon Literary Museum and Monthly Miscellany (1810)
• Hunting and Food-Gathering: Folk-Cultural Questionnaire No. 21