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Money Is Morphing - Cryptocurrency Can Morph To Be An Environmentally And Financially Sustainable Alternative To Traditional Banking, Clovia Hamilton Jun 2024

Money Is Morphing - Cryptocurrency Can Morph To Be An Environmentally And Financially Sustainable Alternative To Traditional Banking, Clovia Hamilton

DePaul Business & Commercial Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The (Second) Race To Space: A Human Rights Analysis Of Rapid Space Innovation, Alyssa Nelson Jan 2022

The (Second) Race To Space: A Human Rights Analysis Of Rapid Space Innovation, Alyssa Nelson

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Paradox Of Free Speech In The Digital World: First Amendment Friendly Proposals For Promoting User Agency, Nadine Strossen Oct 2021

The Paradox Of Free Speech In The Digital World: First Amendment Friendly Proposals For Promoting User Agency, Nadine Strossen

Articles & Chapters

The United States Supreme Court has continued a speech-protective trend dating back to the 1960s, safeguarding even the most controversial speech from government regulation, including speech that critics of this trend label with the stigmatizing terms "hate speech," "disinformation," "misinformation," "extremist speech," and "terrorist speech." In contrast, as dominant online platforms have become increasingly important forums for both individual self-expression and democratic discourse, the platforms have been issuing and enforcing increasing restrictions on their users' speech pursuant to each platform's content moderation policies. These restrictions often suppress speech that the U.S. Constitution bars government from suppressing. As private sector entities, …


Revitalizing Language Through Education: Ireland's Use Of International Law To Drive Linguistic Preservation, Emma A. O'Connell Mar 2021

Revitalizing Language Through Education: Ireland's Use Of International Law To Drive Linguistic Preservation, Emma A. O'Connell

DePaul Journal of Art, Technology & Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Is Data Localization A Solution For Schrems Ii?, Anupam Chander Jul 2020

Is Data Localization A Solution For Schrems Ii?, Anupam Chander

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

For the second time this decade, the Court of Justice of the European Union has struck a blow against the principal mechanisms for personal data transfer to the United States. In Data Protection Commissioner v Facebook Ireland, Maximillian Schrems, the Court declared the EU-US Privacy Shield invalid and placed significant hurdles to the process of transferring personal data from the European Union to the United States via the mechanism of Standard Contractual Clauses. Many have begun to suggest data localization as the solution to the problem of data transfer; that is, don’t transfer the data at all. I argue …


The Overlapping Web Of Data, Territoriality And Sovereignty, Jennifer Daskal Jan 2020

The Overlapping Web Of Data, Territoriality And Sovereignty, Jennifer Daskal

Contributions to Books

Provides a framework to better understand Global Legal Pluralism and the current international state of law.


Equips practitioners, theorists, and students with deeper insights and analytical tools to describe the conflict among legal and quasi-legal systems.

Analyzes global legal pluralism in light of legal theory, constitutionalism, conflict of laws, international law, commercial transactions, and as it affects indigenous polities, religious orders, and citizenship.


Reading Jane Austen Through The Lens Of The Law: Legal Issues In Austen's Life And Novels, Maureen B. Collins Sep 2019

Reading Jane Austen Through The Lens Of The Law: Legal Issues In Austen's Life And Novels, Maureen B. Collins

DePaul Journal of Art, Technology & Intellectual Property Law

No abstract provided.


Where Do We Go From Here? Reflections On The Lco’S Consultation And Conference, Daithí Mac Síthigh Sep 2019

Where Do We Go From Here? Reflections On The Lco’S Consultation And Conference, Daithí Mac Síthigh

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

This is a report on the Law Commission of Ontario’s one-day conference on defamation law and the Internet by the conference rapporteur. After reviewing the topical nature of the event (including its relationship with debate on defamation law in Ontario and elsewhere), this article discusses the position of defamation in a wider legal landscape. Points include the relationship between defamation and privacy, the impact of data protection, and the appropriateness of procedures. Then, the impact of technological change is assessed, referring to the liability of intermediaries, the enforcement of decisions, and the degree to which online communication can support a …


Speech Across Borders, Jennifer Daskal Jan 2019

Speech Across Borders, Jennifer Daskal

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

As both governments and tech companies seek to regulate speech online, these efforts raise critical, and contested, questions about how far those regulations can and should extend. Is it enough to take down or delink material in a geographically segmented way? Or can and should tech companies be ordered to takedown or delink unsavory content across their entire platforms—no matter who is posting the material or where the unwanted content is viewed? How do we deal with conflicting speech norms across borders? And how do we protect against the most censor-prone nation effectively setting global speech rules? These questions were …


Pirate Tales From The Deep [Web]: An Exploration Of Online Copyright Infringement In The Digital Age, Nicholas C. Butland, Justin J. Sullivan Feb 2018

Pirate Tales From The Deep [Web]: An Exploration Of Online Copyright Infringement In The Digital Age, Nicholas C. Butland, Justin J. Sullivan

University of Massachusetts Law Review

Technology has seen a boom over the last few decades, making innovative leaps that border on science fiction. With the most recent technological leap came a new frontier of intellectual property and birthed a new class of criminal: the cyber-pirate. This Article discusses cyber-piracy and its interactions and implications for modern United States copyright law. The Article explains how copyright law, unprepared for the boom, struggled to adapt as courts reconciled the widely physical perceptions of copyright with the digital information being transferred between billions of users instantaneously. The Article also explores how cyber-piracy has made, and continues to make, …


Oversharenting: Is It Really Your Story To Tell?, 33 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 121 (2018), Holly Kathleen Hall Jan 2018

Oversharenting: Is It Really Your Story To Tell?, 33 J. Marshall J. Info. Tech. & Privacy L. 121 (2018), Holly Kathleen Hall

UIC John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

Social media is about sharing information. If you are a parent, often the tendency is to relate every aspect of your children’s lives. Most of the time, children do not consent to postings about them and will have a permanent digital shadow created by their parents that follows them the rest of their lives. The purpose of this article is to analyze the current status and potential future of children’s online privacy from a comparative legal approach, highlighting recent case law in the United Kingdom, which is trending toward carving out special privacy rights for children. This contrasts with the …


The “Sovereigns Of Cyberspace” And State Action: The First Amendment’S Application (Or Lack Thereof) To Third-Party Platforms, Jonathan Peters Jan 2017

The “Sovereigns Of Cyberspace” And State Action: The First Amendment’S Application (Or Lack Thereof) To Third-Party Platforms, Jonathan Peters

Scholarly Works

Many scholars have commented that the state action doctrine forecloses use of the First Amendment to constrain the policies and practices of online service providers. But few have comprehensively studied this issue, and the seminal article exploring “[c]yberspace and the [s]tate [a]ction [d]ebate” is fifteen years old, published before the U.S. Supreme Court reformulated the federal approach to state action. It is important to give the state action doctrine regular scholarly attention, not least because it is increasingly clear that “the private sector has a shared responsibility to help safeguard free expression.” It is critical to understand whether the First …


Against Data Exceptionalism, Andrew Keane Woods Apr 2016

Against Data Exceptionalism, Andrew Keane Woods

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

One of the great regulatory challenges of the Internet era—indeed, one of today's most pressing privacy questions—is how to define the limits of government access to personal data stored in the cloud. This is particularly true today because the cloud has gone global, raising a number of questions about the proper reach of one state's authority over cloud-based data. The prevailing response to these questions by scholars, practitioners, and major Internet companies like Google and Facebook has been to argue that data is different. Data is “unterritorial,” they argue, and therefore incompatible with existing territorial notions of jurisdiction. This Article …


Securing The Smart Grid: Protecting National Security And Privacy Through Mandatory, Enforcable Interoperability Standards, Christopher Bosch Mar 2016

Securing The Smart Grid: Protecting National Security And Privacy Through Mandatory, Enforcable Interoperability Standards, Christopher Bosch

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Think Twice Before Posting Online: Criminalizing Threats Under 18 U.S.C. § 875(C) After Elonis, 50 J. Marshall L. Rev. 167 (2016), Georgette Geha Jan 2016

Think Twice Before Posting Online: Criminalizing Threats Under 18 U.S.C. § 875(C) After Elonis, 50 J. Marshall L. Rev. 167 (2016), Georgette Geha

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.


Wide Right: How Isp Immunity And Current Laws Are Off The Mark In Protecting The Modern Athlete On Social Media, Dominick J. Mingione Jun 2015

Wide Right: How Isp Immunity And Current Laws Are Off The Mark In Protecting The Modern Athlete On Social Media, Dominick J. Mingione

Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum

“[Y]our tranny looking dad is a disgrace to American football,” “I would rape the shit out of her,” and “[The] [B]ears are easier than you on prom night,” are just a sampling of some of the alarmingly harassing tweets received by Chloe Trestman between the night of November 9, 2014 and November 10, 2014. Who is Chloe Trestman, and what could she have possibly done to warrant such abuse? Chloe’s father is Marc Trestman, the head coach of the Chicago Bears. And the twitter vitriol, or “twitriol,” directed toward Chloe was in response to the Bears’ blowout loss to their …


The Constitution And Revenge Porn, John A. Humbach May 2015

The Constitution And Revenge Porn, John A. Humbach

Pace Law Review

While the Supreme Court has recognized a number of circumstances that justify government impingements on free expression, the Court has been extremely reluctant to permit speech restrictions that discriminate based on a message’s content, its viewpoint, or the speaker. It has nearly always refused to tolerate such discrimination unless the case falls within one of the several historically established exceptions to First Amendment protection. Because of the special place that the modern First Amendment cases accord to content discrimination (and the allied discriminations based on viewpoint and speaker), any statutes designed specifically to outlaw revenge porn as such would seem …


An Uneasy Balance: Personal Information And Crowdfunding Under The Jobs Act, Brice Kindred Jan 2015

An Uneasy Balance: Personal Information And Crowdfunding Under The Jobs Act, Brice Kindred

Richmond Journal of Law & Technology

“Crowdfunding” is the raising of small amounts of money from many different sources for a particular purpose. Today, this usually takes place online.2 Crowdfunding has become a popular means of raising funds for a wide variety of projects, causes, and business ventures. Websites like Kickstarter, Indiegogo, and Crowdfunder allow people to create a profile for their project and solicit contributions from the general public in support.


Setting The Tipping Point For Disclosing The Identity Of Anonymous Online Speakers: Lessons From Other Disclosure Contexts, Helen Norton Jan 2014

Setting The Tipping Point For Disclosing The Identity Of Anonymous Online Speakers: Lessons From Other Disclosure Contexts, Helen Norton

Publications

At what point should anonymous online speakers alleged to have engaged in defamatory, threatening, or other unprotected and illegal speech be required to “unmask” themselves – i.e., to disclose their identities? Courts confronted with such questions have proposed a variety of tests that seek to determine the point – I’ll call this the tipping point – at which they become sufficiently confident that disclosure’s accountability gains justify the unmasking of an anonymous online speaker. This essay suggests that an intradisciplinary approach may be helpful when choosing among these alternative tests. To this end, it recalls parallel disclosure challenges in campaign, …


Asterisk Revisited: Debating A Right Of Reply On Search Results, Frank Pasquale Aug 2013

Asterisk Revisited: Debating A Right Of Reply On Search Results, Frank Pasquale

Frank A. Pasquale

No abstract provided.


The Nsa's Prism Program And The New Eu Privacy Regulation: Why U.S. Companies With A Presence In The Eu Could Be In Trouble, Juhi Tariq Jan 2013

The Nsa's Prism Program And The New Eu Privacy Regulation: Why U.S. Companies With A Presence In The Eu Could Be In Trouble, Juhi Tariq

American University Business Law Review

No abstract provided.


Emerging Technologies And Dwindling Speech, Jorge R. Roig Dec 2012

Emerging Technologies And Dwindling Speech, Jorge R. Roig

Jorge R Roig

Inspired in part by the recent holding in Bland v. Roberts that the use of the “Like” feature in Facebook is not covered by the Free Speech Clause, this article makes a brief foray into the approach that courts have taken in the recent past towards questions of First Amendment coverage in the context of emerging technologies. Specifically, this article will take a closer look at how courts have dealt with the issue of functionality in the context of First Amendment coverage of computer source code. The analysis of this and other recent experiences, when put in a larger context, …


Cyberterrorism In The Context Of Contemporary International Law, Yaroslav Shiryaev Nov 2012

Cyberterrorism In The Context Of Contemporary International Law, Yaroslav Shiryaev

San Diego International Law Journal

The present Article addressed the legal issues surrounding cyberterrorism. In the first chapter, the author explains why cyberterrorism should be described as “the use of electronic networks taking the form of a cyber-attack to commit a) a substantive act criminalized by the existing legal instruments prohibiting terrorism, or b) an act of terrorism under international customary law.” Further, with a special emphasis on existing anti-terrorism conventions and customary international law, it was demonstrated which actors are likely to engage in acts of cyberterrorism (non-state actors, corporations and individuals), as well as which targets are protected by law and which aims …


The Curious Case Of Convenience Casinos: How Internet Sweepstakes Cafes Survive In A Gray Area Between Unlawful Gambling And Legitimate Business Promotions, 29 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 594 (2012), Steve Silver Jan 2012

The Curious Case Of Convenience Casinos: How Internet Sweepstakes Cafes Survive In A Gray Area Between Unlawful Gambling And Legitimate Business Promotions, 29 J. Marshall J. Computer & Info. L. 594 (2012), Steve Silver

UIC John Marshall Journal of Information Technology & Privacy Law

No abstract provided.


A Theory Of The Perverse Verdict, Bethel G.A Erastus-Obilo Aug 2011

A Theory Of The Perverse Verdict, Bethel G.A Erastus-Obilo

Bethel G.A Erastus-Obilo

The concept of a perverse verdict is one that pervades the Criminal justice system of nearly all common law jurisdictions. The English Criminal Justice system is no exception and the concept has become institutionalised as if it were a true occurrence. This paper challenges the idea and argues that it is, technically, a legal non-event given the system of trial by jury. The theory is that besides the jury, no one else is invested with the power and authority to declare a verdict and this position is supported both by legal custom and the mechanism of the criminal justice system. …


School Discipline Of Cyber-Bullies: A Proposed Threshold That Respects Constitutional Rights, 45 J. Marshall L. Rev. 85 (2011), Laura Pavlik Raatjes Jan 2011

School Discipline Of Cyber-Bullies: A Proposed Threshold That Respects Constitutional Rights, 45 J. Marshall L. Rev. 85 (2011), Laura Pavlik Raatjes

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Portrait Of The Internet As A Young Man, Ann Bartow Apr 2010

A Portrait Of The Internet As A Young Man, Ann Bartow

Michigan Law Review

In brief, the core theory of Jonathan Zittrain's 2008 book The Future of the Internet-And How to Stop It is this: good laws, norms, and code are needed to regulate the Internet, to prevent bad laws, norms, and code from compromising its creative capabilities and fettering its fecund flexibility. A far snarkier if less alliterative summary would be "We have to regulate the Internet to preserve its open, unregulated nature." Zittrain posits that either a substantive series of unfortunate Internet events or one catastrophic one will motivate governments to try to regulate cyberspace in a way that promotes maximum stability, …


Discriminatory Housing Advertisements On-Line: Lessons From Craigslist, Rigel C. Oliveri Jan 2010

Discriminatory Housing Advertisements On-Line: Lessons From Craigslist, Rigel C. Oliveri

Faculty Publications

The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to publish discriminatory housing advertisements. This has long been applied to newspapers, which have effectively screened all discriminatory housing ads from sight. However, in 1996 Congress created a loophole when it immunized website operators from liability for the content posted to their sites by third parties. Without publisher liability, websites have no incentive to screen out discriminatory housing ads. The result is that such ads are proliferating in cyberspace.While this situation is problematic from a fair housing standpoint, it presents a valuable opportunity. For the first time in a generation discriminatory housing advertisements …


A Portrait Of The Internet As A Young Man, Ann Bartow Jan 2010

A Portrait Of The Internet As A Young Man, Ann Bartow

Law Faculty Scholarship

In brief, the core theory of Jonathan Zittrain’s1 2008 book The Future of the Internet - and How to Stop It is this: good laws, norms, and code are needed to regulate the Internet, to prevent bad laws, norms, and code from compromising its creative capabilities and fettering its fecund flexibility. A far snarkier if less alliterative summary would be “We have to regulate the Internet to preserve its open, unregulated nature.” Zittrain posits that either a substantive series of unfortunate Internet events or one catastrophic one will motivate governments to try to regulate cyberspace in a way that promotes …


Asterisk Revisited: Debating A Right Of Reply On Search Results, Frank Pasquale Jan 2008

Asterisk Revisited: Debating A Right Of Reply On Search Results, Frank Pasquale

Journal of Business & Technology Law

No abstract provided.