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2009

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Articles 31 - 35 of 35

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Bartolome De Las Casas Revisited, Amber Ferris Jan 2009

Bartolome De Las Casas Revisited, Amber Ferris

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

Christopher Columbus' discovery of the Americas in 1492 opened a whole new world to the Europeans. The discovered land held new resources, new territory, and new peoples. Conquistadors were enthralled by the lure of gold and territory. But the Spanish government and colonists faced the problem of the nature and status of the people that already inhabited these lands. Were they to be treated as equals, serfs, or slaves? Were they even really people? The answers to these questions were complex and unclear. The Spanish crown made many laws regarding how the natives and colonists should interact, however, much of ...


Alfred Thayer Mahan And The Making Of The Superior Other, John William Mcglashan Jan 2009

Alfred Thayer Mahan And The Making Of The Superior Other, John William Mcglashan

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Sarah's Song: How Folk Music Shattered Slaveholding Ideology In Antebellum Alabama, Charles Allen Wallace Jan 2009

Sarah's Song: How Folk Music Shattered Slaveholding Ideology In Antebellum Alabama, Charles Allen Wallace

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


The Mormon Passage Of George D. Watt: First British Convert, Scribe For Zion, Ronald G. Watt Jan 2009

The Mormon Passage Of George D. Watt: First British Convert, Scribe For Zion, Ronald G. Watt

All USU Press Publications

Nineteenth century Mormonism was a frontier religion with roots so entangled with the American experience as to be seen by some scholars as the most American of religions and by others as a direct critique of that experience. Yet it was also a missionary religion that through proselytizing quickly gained an international, if initially mostly Northern European, makeup. This mix brought it a roster of interesting characters: frontiersmen and hardscrabble farmers; preachers and theologians; dreamers and idealists; craftsmen and social engineers. Although the Mormon elite soon took on, as elites do, a rather fixed, dynastic character, the social origins of ...


"It Was Still No South To Us": African American Civil Servants At The Fin De Siècle, Eric S. Yellin Jan 2009

"It Was Still No South To Us": African American Civil Servants At The Fin De Siècle, Eric S. Yellin

History Faculty Publications

If Washingtonians know anything about black civil servants of the early twentieth century, it is that they faced discrimination under President Woodrow Wilson. Beginning in 1913, Wilson’s Democratic administration dismantled a biracial, Republican-led coalition that had struggled since Reconstruction to make government offices places of racial egalitarianism. During Wilson's presidency, federal officials imposed "segregation" (actually exclusion), rearranged the political patronage system, and undercut black ambition. The Wilson administration's policies were a disaster for black civil servants, who responded with one of the first national civil rights campaigns in U.S. history. But to fully grapple with the ...