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Race Reform In The Early Twentieth Century South: The Life And Work Of Willis Duke Weatherford., Sara Trowbridge Combs Dec 2004

Race Reform In The Early Twentieth Century South: The Life And Work Of Willis Duke Weatherford., Sara Trowbridge Combs

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Willis Duke Weatherford, a liberal pioneer in Southern race reform, argued that the ethics of Christianity obligated Southerners to address the social and economic problems faced by blacks in the early twentieth century. His strategy for improving race relations centred on educating Southerners and promoting economic uplift for blacks. Weatherford advocated race reform through the Young Men's Christian Association, the Southern Sociological Congress, and other voluntary organizations. He published books, taught courses, preached sermons, organized conferences, and raised funds from Northern philanthropists. Through an analysis of Weatherford's published writings and of his papers archived at the Southern Historical ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2004/2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2004

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2004/2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

Newsletter UNiVfeftsnY or the Pacific, Stockton, cA Volume 15, Number 1 Winter 2004/2005 Black Sheep of the in Muir's Motivations for Yosemite National hi] Jeimij Krone ERRA: GREAT! Park (he expansive 760,000-acre Yosemite National Park consists of meadows, forests, and mountains that presently awe over three million visitors annually.1 Yosemite Valley became the second national park in 1890 after an intense nationwide conflict that most tourists neglect to acknowledge when scaling the glacial-smoothened sides of Half Dome or navigating woodlands of sugar pines and giant sequoias. John Muir, a foremost figure in the early conservation movement ...


An Examination Of Bernard Connor's The History Of Poland (1698) And Its Depiction Of The Political, Religious, And Cultural History Of The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, John Paul Bardunias Oct 2004

An Examination Of Bernard Connor's The History Of Poland (1698) And Its Depiction Of The Political, Religious, And Cultural History Of The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, John Paul Bardunias

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Connor was an Irish-born member of seventeenth-century English medical society who made an impact on medicine through his use of anatomy. This forward-thinking scientist also worked as a court physician for the Polish king John III Sobieski (1629- 1696) and published a history of that country.

This thesis will examine Bernard Connor's 1698 publication The History of Poland to show that the Commonwealth was considered a vision of a progressive European parliamentary government that could serve as a model for a struggling English parliamentary government, thus supporting Larry Wolff and Maria Todorova's vision of the later eighteenth-century ...


Interview With Harold D. Paxton, M.D., Harold D. Paxton M.D. (Interviewee), Richard Mullins M.D. (Interviewer), Matthew Simek (Interviewer) Jun 2004

Interview With Harold D. Paxton, M.D., Harold D. Paxton M.D. (Interviewee), Richard Mullins M.D. (Interviewer), Matthew Simek (Interviewer)

Oral History Collection

Harold D. Paxton, M.D., discusses his medical education years, his long career in neurosurgery, and his experiences on the faculty at the University of Oregon Medical School. He comments on the tension between medicine and law, the evolution of the physician-patient relationship, the looming shortage of physicians, and the rise of specialization and its possible impact on the future of the sole practitioner. Dr. Paxton was born in Clay, West Virginia on March 12, 1924. He obtained his medical degree at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1948 and completed his internship and residencies at Albany Medical Center ...


“Imagined Communities” In Showcases: The Nationality Rooms Program At The University Of Pittsburgh (1926-1945), Lucia Curta Jun 2004

“Imagined Communities” In Showcases: The Nationality Rooms Program At The University Of Pittsburgh (1926-1945), Lucia Curta

Dissertations

From the inception of the program in 1926, the Nationality Rooms at the University of Pittsburgh were viewed as apolitical in their iconography. Their purpose was primarily didactic. Designed as classrooms meant for lectures and seminars, they were however ad-hoc museums for the display of symbols of national identity. In many ways, they constitute an excellent illustration in terms of the decorative arts of Benedict Anderson's concept of "imagined communities."

The identity referent of the symbolism attached to the decorative arrangements of these rooms was not that of the ethnic communities in Pittsburgh, for whom the rooms were supposedly ...


The Translation Of Radical Ideas Into Radical Action: The American Revolution And Revolutionary Philadelphia, Angela Skeggs '04 Apr 2004

The Translation Of Radical Ideas Into Radical Action: The American Revolution And Revolutionary Philadelphia, Angela Skeggs '04

Honors Projects

The battle for the independence of the American colonies has been attributed to many competing motives and factors. Within the vast array of literature on the subject, there are different schools of interpretation. Progressive-era historians tend to focus upon economic motivations underlying the American Revolution.] Within this school of thought historians actually explored possible class conflict and the social ramifications of the revolution. An opposing school of thought arose out of reaction against the progressive historians. The Neo-Whig school of thought placed a higher value on constitutional principles and ideas during the American Revolution, and discounted other motives driving the ...


"Everybody Drinks Water": Mark Twain's Critique Of Social Darwinism, Sarah Vales '04 Apr 2004

"Everybody Drinks Water": Mark Twain's Critique Of Social Darwinism, Sarah Vales '04

Honors Projects

Mark Twain wrote during the time period from approximately 1860 to 1900, commonly known as the Gilded Age. Change defined these years as America industrialized, urbanized, and expanded. Along with the change came an array of social problems, which produced a dichotomy between the outward success of the changes and the inward turmoil wrought on society.


A Coat Of Many Colors: Immigration, Globalization, And Reform In New York City's Garment Industry, Daniel Soyer Apr 2004

A Coat Of Many Colors: Immigration, Globalization, And Reform In New York City's Garment Industry, Daniel Soyer

History

For more than a century and a half—from the middle of the 19th century to the end of the 20th—the garment industry was the largest manufacturing industry in New York City, and New York made more clothes than anywhere else.

For generations, the industry employed more New Yorkers than any other and was central to the city’s history, culture, and identity. Today, although no longer the big heart of industrial New York, the needle trades are still an important part of the city’s economy—especially for the new waves of immigrants who cut, sew, and assemble ...


Chicago's Other Magnificent Mile: Howard Street's Growth And Its Effect Upon The Rogers Park Neighborhood, Ryan Mcguinness '04 Apr 2004

Chicago's Other Magnificent Mile: Howard Street's Growth And Its Effect Upon The Rogers Park Neighborhood, Ryan Mcguinness '04

Honors Projects

The town sorts itself into neighborhoods spaces, into social classes, into languages and nationalities and colors, into parishes and school districts and shopping streets and block clubs and bus routes. And into hope and dreams, for that matter. It's a dreamers town, for all of its harshness. Some of it writhing, some waiting, some being reborn. It's passe, it's fresh, it's gone and it's coming, and as it sheds one skin it grows another. It's a town that never stops, a neighborhood for the world. The best place to put your finger on its ...


Interview With Robert And Esther Fortenbaugh, February 22, 2004, Robert Fortenbaugh, Esther Fortenbaugh, Michael J. Birkner Feb 2004

Interview With Robert And Esther Fortenbaugh, February 22, 2004, Robert Fortenbaugh, Esther Fortenbaugh, Michael J. Birkner

Oral Histories

Robert & Esther Fortenbaugh were interviewed on February 22, 2004 by Michael J. Birkner. Esther discussed her early years and Robert discussed his career at American Cyanimid and then as a United Methodist Minister. They both discussed their time at Gettysburg College (including meeting each other), their life after college, and returning to Gettysburg after retirement.

Length of Interview: 88 minutes

Collection Note: This oral history was selected from the Oral History Collection maintained by Special Collections & College Archives. Transcripts are available for browsing in the Special Collections Reading Room, 4th floor, Musselman Library. GettDigital contains the complete listing of ...


Sisters Of St Joseph: The Tasmanian Experience: The Foundation Of The Sisters Of St Joseph In Tasmania 1887-1937, Josephine Margaret Brady Jan 2004

Sisters Of St Joseph: The Tasmanian Experience: The Foundation Of The Sisters Of St Joseph In Tasmania 1887-1937, Josephine Margaret Brady

Theses

This thesis reports on and analyses the first fifty years, 1887-1937, of the Sisters of Saint Joseph's ministry in Tasmania. The design of the study is qualitative in nature, employing ethnographic techniques with a thematic approach to the narrative. Through a multifaceted approach the main figures of the Josephite story of the first fifty years are examined. The thesis attempts to redress the imbalance of the representation of women in Australian history and the Catholic Church in particular. The thesis is that as a uniquely Australian congregation the Tasmanian Sisters of St Joseph were focused on the preservation of ...


Seasons In Hell: Charles S. Johnson And The 1930 Liberian Labor Crisis, Phillip James Johnson Jan 2004

Seasons In Hell: Charles S. Johnson And The 1930 Liberian Labor Crisis, Phillip James Johnson

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

In 1930, African American sociologist Charles S. Johnson of Fisk University traveled to the Republic of Liberia as the American member of a League of Nations commission to investigate allegations of slavery and forced labor in that West African nation. In the previous five years, the face of Liberia had changed after the large-scale development of rubber plantations on land leased by the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, with headquarters in Akron, Ohio. Political turmoil greeted Johnson in Liberia, an underdeveloped nation teetering on the brink of economic collapse. This dissertation focuses on Johnson’s role as the key member ...


German Stereotypes In British Magazines Prior To World War I, William F. Bertolette Jan 2004

German Stereotypes In British Magazines Prior To World War I, William F. Bertolette

LSU Master's Theses

The British image of Germany as England's "poor relation," a backward cluster of feudal states, gave way during the nineteenth century to the stereotype of England's archenemy and imperial rival. This shift from innocuous Old Germany to menacing New Germany accelerated after German unification in 1871 as German economic growth and imperial ambitions became topics for commentary in British journals. But the stereotypical "German Michael," or rustic simpleton, and other images of self-effacing servile, loyal, honest and passive Old Germany lingered on into the late nineteenth century as a "straw man" for alarmist Germanophobes to dispel with new ...