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Cleaning Up Nasty Nac: Vice, Race, And Social Reform In Nacogdoches, Texas, 1870 To 1915, Kayla L. Fox May 2016

Cleaning Up Nasty Nac: Vice, Race, And Social Reform In Nacogdoches, Texas, 1870 To 1915, Kayla L. Fox

All Graduate Plan B and other Reports

In 1910, Della Sutphen, an African American widow and single mother, was indicted in Nacogdoches, Texas, for running a “house of ill repute.” Della and her young son shared a home with another single black woman, Rena Hooper. However, Nacogdoches County officials did not seem to be all that worried about prostitution; Della was one of several African Americans repeatedly arrested for selling liquor.1 Della’s prostitution charge went hand in hand with a charge of selling liquor illegally, and this was one of three instances in which she suffered arrest for this crime.

Nacogdoches had a long history ...


The Vox Populi Is The Vox Dei: American Localism And The Mormon Expulsion From Jackson County, Missouri, Matthew Lund May 2012

The Vox Populi Is The Vox Dei: American Localism And The Mormon Expulsion From Jackson County, Missouri, Matthew Lund

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In 1833, enraged vigilantes expelled 1,200 Mormons from Jackson County, Missouri, setting a precedent for a later expulsion of Mormons from the state, changing the course of Mormon history, and enacting in microcosm a battle over the ultimate source of authority in America’s early democratic society. The purpose of this study is two-fold: first, to reexamine the motives that induced Missourians to expel Mormons from Jackson County in 1833; and second, to explore how government authorities responded to that conflict. Past studies of the Mormon expulsion from Jackson County have argued that Mormon communalism collided with the Jacksonian ...


"Real, Live Mormon Women": Understanding The Role Of Early Twentieth-Century Lds Lady Missionaries, Kelly Lelegren May 2009

"Real, Live Mormon Women": Understanding The Role Of Early Twentieth-Century Lds Lady Missionaries, Kelly Lelegren

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Missionary work has long been an important aspect of Christianity. At least as early as the 1870's, Protestant women began journeys to foreign lands to work as missionaries and teach people about Christianity, both the spiritual dimension and the lifestyle. These were primarily independent women who sought to enlarge the women's sphere from the confined, domestic life to which they were accustomed and because of its decline by the 1930's, historians have often labeled these missions as a "feminist movement."

Meanwhile, in 1898, their counterparts from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints also began filling ...


'That Place Over There' A Journalistic Look At Latter-Day Corinne, The Last Gentile Railroad Boomtown In The Mormon Lands Of Utah, John W. Morris May 1987

'That Place Over There' A Journalistic Look At Latter-Day Corinne, The Last Gentile Railroad Boomtown In The Mormon Lands Of Utah, John W. Morris

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The effort here, compiled over a nearly three-year period, is simply to encourage reporters of the mass media, those recorders of instant history on a daily basis, to take the time to put down in print somewhere the memories of old-timers everywhere. While centered in Corinne, Utah, the last rabble-rousing boomtown along the first transcontinental railroad to span the United States, this work is a collection of feature articles, laced with anecdotes and perhaps tall tales, of the type old-timers are eager to tell. It is a renegade mixture of oral and written histories and probably breaks most of the ...


A History Of Brigham Young College, Logan, Utah, Arnold K. Garr May 1973

A History Of Brigham Young College, Logan, Utah, Arnold K. Garr

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Before Brigham Young College was founded in 1877, a variety of schools existed in Utah. The Mormons at first, and later the Protestants and Catholics made significant contributions to education in the territory. Education has always played an important role in the philosophy of the Mormon church. In the early days of church history, the Mormons founded schools in the places they settled. This policy continued when they settled in Utah.