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Pond, Noah Sherman, 1815-1892 (Sc 3203), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Apr 2018

Pond, Noah Sherman, 1815-1892 (Sc 3203), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and full text of letters (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3203. Four letters, 1836-1837, of Noah S. Pond to his sister and brother-in-law in Washington, Connecticut. Writing from New Design, Trigg County, Kentucky, where he is working as a peddler, Pond describes many aspects of life in frontier Kentucky: changeable weather, agricultural practices and prices, lay preaching, voting, and the lives of slaves, who he believes are well treated and better off than the poor in the North. He describes selling to a Dutchman who dislikes “Yankees,” notes recent political developments, and finds Kentucky …


Shakers And Jerkers: Letters From The "Long Walk," 1805, Part 2, Douglas L. Winiarski Jan 2018

Shakers And Jerkers: Letters From The "Long Walk," 1805, Part 2, Douglas L. Winiarski

Religious Studies Faculty Publications

Throughout the bitterly cold month of January 1805, John Meacham (1770-1854), Issachar Bates (1758-1837), and Benjamin Youngs (1774- 1855), struggled through mud and ice, biting winds, blinding snow, and drenching rains, on a 1,200-mile “Long Walk” to the settlements of the trans-Appalachian West. Traveling south toward Cumberland Gap, the three Shaker missionaries from New Lebanon, New York, were tracking a strange new convulsive religious phenomenon that had gripped Scots-Irish Presbyterians during the frontier religious awakening known as the Great Revival (1799-1805). Observers called the puzzling somatic fits “the Jerks.” Ardent supporters of the revivals believed the jerks were a sign …