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Legal Paperwork And Public Policy: Eliza Orme’S Professional Expertise In Late-Victorian Britain, Leslie Howsam Jan 2021

Legal Paperwork And Public Policy: Eliza Orme’S Professional Expertise In Late-Victorian Britain, Leslie Howsam

History Publications

For women in late-nineteenth-century Britain, a university degree in law could launch a lucrative and prestigious career that was professional in character but lacked a name because it challenged the very culture of expertise. Highly regulated by powerful institutions, the legal profession established conditions beyond precarity to exclude women until 1919 and the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act.1 However, the universities, operating with different values, began cautiously in the 1870s to allow women to attend lectures and later to write examinations and, eventually, to graduate with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Historical studies of women and the legal profession have …


Why Did The Signers Of The Declaration Of Independence Engage In This Treasonous Act?, Marvin L. Simner Jan 2021

Why Did The Signers Of The Declaration Of Independence Engage In This Treasonous Act?, Marvin L. Simner

History Publications

The penalty for committing an act of treason against the Crown in 1775, as read by British judges sentencing Irish rebels, was as follows:

You are to be drawn on hurdles to the place of execution, where you are to be hanged by the neck, but not until you are dead; for, while you are still living your bodies are to be taken down, your bowels torn out and burned before your faces, your heads then cut off, and your bodies divided each into four quarters, and your heads and quarters to be then at the King’s disposal; and may …


Fighting Like The Devil For The Sake Of God: Protestants, Catholics And The Origins Of Violence In Victorian Belfast, By Mark Doyle, Adam Pole Jan 2011

Fighting Like The Devil For The Sake Of God: Protestants, Catholics And The Origins Of Violence In Victorian Belfast, By Mark Doyle, Adam Pole

History Publications

No abstract provided.


Gender And Sexuality In Victorian England: An Analysis Of The Autobiography Of Christopher Kirkland, Pauline Phipps Jul 2002

Gender And Sexuality In Victorian England: An Analysis Of The Autobiography Of Christopher Kirkland, Pauline Phipps

History Publications

This paper examines Eliza Lynn Linton's experience as a result of her conflicting sentiments about English Victorian gendered norms. Linton's “male” ambition facilitated her entrance into the male work sphere, yet her writing preached the values of domesticity while denigrating women such as herself, who sought careers. Eliza's gender dilemma was best projected in her autobiographical novel, The Autobiography of Christopher Kirkland (1885). This text, which evokes the ambivalence between her acclamation of femininity and her “mannish” behaviour, indicates the tenuous structure of gender and emotional norms. The “role” Eliza assumes as a male suitor, while suggesting interesting meanings about …