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“The Frontier Thesis In Transnational Migration: The U.S. West In The Making Of Italy Abroad,” In Immigrants In The Far West: Historical Identities And Experiences, Edited By Jessie L. Embry And Brian Q. Cannon (Salt Lake City: University Of Utah Press, 2014), 363-381., Mark I. Choate Jan 2014

“The Frontier Thesis In Transnational Migration: The U.S. West In The Making Of Italy Abroad,” In Immigrants In The Far West: Historical Identities And Experiences, Edited By Jessie L. Embry And Brian Q. Cannon (Salt Lake City: University Of Utah Press, 2014), 363-381., Mark I. Choate

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No abstract provided.


What's In A Name? The Establishment Of Camp Douglas, Kenneth L. Alford Ph.D., William P. Mackinnon Jan 2012

What's In A Name? The Establishment Of Camp Douglas, Kenneth L. Alford Ph.D., William P. Mackinnon

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A discussion of the establishment (1862) of Camp Douglas, Utah Territory -- named by Col. Patrick Edward Connor after U.S. Senator Stephen A. Douglas.


The Swiss At The Battle Of The Little Bighorn, 1876, Albert Winkler Feb 2011

The Swiss At The Battle Of The Little Bighorn, 1876, Albert Winkler

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Twelve men born in Switzerland are known to have been in the Seventh Cavalry in June of 1876, at the time of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and seven of them participated in the battle. Five of these men were killed in the engagement. Much is known about the activities of some of these men, and John Lattman from Zurich left a good account of his experiences. The Swiss were slightly older than most of the men in the Seventh Cavalry, and they were about average in height as the other troopers. These Swiss showed much dedication to their ...


Camp Douglas: Keeping A Watchful Eye On The Saints, Kenneth L. Alford Ph.D. Jan 2011

Camp Douglas: Keeping A Watchful Eye On The Saints, Kenneth L. Alford Ph.D.

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A discussion of the establishment (1862) and early years of Camp Douglas, Utah Territory. Discusses the tense relationship between Brigham Young and Colonel (later Brigadier General) Patrick Edward Connor, U.S. Army commander of Camp Douglas.


“The Tunisia Paradox: Italy’S Strategic Aims, French Imperial Rule, And Migration In The Mediterranean Basin.” California Italian Studies 1, “Italy In The Mediterranean” (2010): 1-20., Mark I. Choate Jan 2010

“The Tunisia Paradox: Italy’S Strategic Aims, French Imperial Rule, And Migration In The Mediterranean Basin.” California Italian Studies 1, “Italy In The Mediterranean” (2010): 1-20., Mark I. Choate

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This article explores contradictions in Italy’s relationship with the Mediterranean basin, setting Tunisia as a focal point. Tunisia was a paradoxical case at the intersection of Italy’s foreign policy: it was a former Roman imperial colony with a strategic location, but it was also a large and vibrant Italian emigrant settlement, like the Italian “colonies” of Buenos Aires, Sao Paolo, New York, and San Francisco. This situation caused much confusion in debates over how Italy should develop its international influence. Faced with a choice of priorities, the Italians of Tunisia called for Italy to concentrate on establishing territorial ...


Pronounced Clean, Comfortable, And Good Looking: The Passage Of Mormon Immigrants Through The Port Of Philadelphia, Fred E. Woods Mar 2005

Pronounced Clean, Comfortable, And Good Looking: The Passage Of Mormon Immigrants Through The Port Of Philadelphia, Fred E. Woods

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We were pronounced clean, comfortable, and good looking. So wrote LDS voyage leader Matthias Cowley after arriving in Philadelphia with a company of foreign Saints in the mid-nineteenth century. At this time, Latter-day Saint European immigrants, obeying the call to come to Zion, were gathering to America by the thousands on the way to their Mormon Mecca in Salt Lake City. They were obeying the call to come to Zion. In 1852, the First Presidency issued the following counsel: "When a people, or individuals, hear the Gospel, obey its first principles, are baptized for the remission of sins, and receive ...


Two Sides Of A River: Mormon Transmigration Through Quincy, Illinois, And Hannibal, Missouri, Fred E. Woods Jan 2001

Two Sides Of A River: Mormon Transmigration Through Quincy, Illinois, And Hannibal, Missouri, Fred E. Woods

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The infamous extermination order issued 27 October 1838 by Missouri Governor Lilburn W. Boggs caused thousands of Latter-day Saints to flee the state and seek refuge in Illinois across the Mississippi River. Illinois, established in 1817, had high hopes for its future, but just two decades later it was smitten, like the rest of America, with the economic depression of 1837. In such a needy condition, the people Illinois welcomed the Mormon migrants for three central reasons. Financially motivated, the state viewed the Latter-day Saint influx as an opportunity to raise its population to boost the economy through the collection ...


Gathering To Nauvoo: Mormon Immigration 1840-46, Fred E. Woods Jan 1999

Gathering To Nauvoo: Mormon Immigration 1840-46, Fred E. Woods

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The gathering of the Mormon pioneers to Utah (commencing in 1847) has received extensive attention; however, the earlier LDS immigration to Nauvoo has not been adequately treated. This paper is the inspiring story of the British Saints who traveled to Nauvoo between June 1840 and February 1846. The international call to gather was received by the Prophet Joseph Smith during the second presentation of the Restored Church, less than six months after its organization in 1830.