Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Digital Commons Network

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Entire DC Network

Assassination Of Michael Collins: A Revival In Gaelic Nationalism, Tara Sandle May 2015

Assassination Of Michael Collins: A Revival In Gaelic Nationalism, Tara Sandle

Senior Honors Theses

This paper examines the link between the assassination of Michael Collins, the leader of the Irish Republican Army and then the National Army, and the rise in Gaelic Nationalism across Ireland after his death. Ireland struggled to gain independence from England throughout history because England controlled all aspects of Irish life. It was not until 1916, during the Easter Rising, that Collins started to play a key role in Ireland’s mission to gain independence. As a result, Collins became a symbol of hope for Ireland’s nationalism. On August 22, 1922, Michael Collins was assassinated and became a martyr ...


Fiction And Folklore, Etymology And Folk Etymology, Linguistics And Literature, Leonard R.N. Ashley Oct 2014

Fiction And Folklore, Etymology And Folk Etymology, Linguistics And Literature, Leonard R.N. Ashley

Literary Onomastics Studies

No abstract provided.


Prohibition Era Rochester: A Family Affair, Russell G. Hendrick Dec 2013

Prohibition Era Rochester: A Family Affair, Russell G. Hendrick

Education and Human Development Master's Theses

This project researched the largely overlooked historical topic of Rochester, NY during the Prohibition Era. It draws upon a wide variety of sources, including oral history from the author’s family who were directly involved in the illegal sale of alcohol in Rochester. These stories offer unique insight into the heretofore-undocumented side of the speakeasy operators. The combination of oral history and more traditional research offers a diverse interpretation of Rochester NY during the Prohibition Era. The project also includes a historiography of research on Prohibition in general and Rochester specifically as well as a DBQ designed for 8th ...


Main Street, Marion, And Miscegenation: The Warren Harding Race Rumor And The Social Construction Of Race And Marriage, Stephen K. Lang Oct 2013

Main Street, Marion, And Miscegenation: The Warren Harding Race Rumor And The Social Construction Of Race And Marriage, Stephen K. Lang

History Master's Theses

In the final weeks of the 1920 presidential election campaign, an eccentric college professor from Ohio, William Estabrook Chancellor, distributed a series of leaflets across the Midwest that claimed the Republican candidate and future president, Warren G. Harding, was racially “impure.” Much has been written about Chancellor, his racist theories, which were based on the “scientific racism” of the time, and his relationship to the Democratic Party. What has not been examined, however, is how his allegations about Harding were connected broadly to the social construction of whiteness in America in the twentieth century. In this context, the Harding race ...


Time Lines Fall 2012, Teri Rombaut Oct 2012

Time Lines Fall 2012, Teri Rombaut

History Newsletters

The Fall 2012 edition of Time Lines recognizes the successes of our students and the activities of our faculty and alumni, and offers news of two recent initiatives: the development of a new concentration in public history, and our new summer study abroad program in Maynooth.

Volume 25


"When Bridget Is Good She Is So Very Good ... When She Is Bad, She Is Horrid": Portrayals Of Female Irish Immigrants In America During The Late Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Centuries, Cara Smith Aug 2008

"When Bridget Is Good She Is So Very Good ... When She Is Bad, She Is Horrid": Portrayals Of Female Irish Immigrants In America During The Late Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Centuries, Cara Smith

History Master's Theses

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Irish women accounted for more than half of all Irish emigrants to leave Ireland. A great portion of these women settled in urban centers on the East coast of the United States where a large percentage took jobs as domestic servants. The great number of Irish women involved in domestic service led to the emergence of the negative stereotype of the Irish maid "Bridget," in popular entertainment and literature. Further research into the literature and data of the time shows positive contemporary descriptions of Irish women involved in American domestic service. These ...


Time Lines Spring 2006, Teri Rombaut Apr 2006

Time Lines Spring 2006, Teri Rombaut

History Newsletters

The Spring 2006 edition of Time Lines honors Dr. John Killigrew who retired after 43 years at Brockport, has a memorial to Adjunct Instructor Terry Lee Gore, welcomes new faculty Dr. Takashi Nishiyama and Dr. Carl Davila, recognizes the successes of our students and the activities of our faculty and alumni, and celebrates the opening of the Milne Seminar Room in Drake Memorial Library.

Volume 18, Issue 1


Protestors, Police, Presidents And Politicians, Buffalo, Brockport, Blacks And Buffalonians: Bloody Battle And Peaceful Protest Against The Vietnam War In Western New York, Joshua Baker Jan 2006

Protestors, Police, Presidents And Politicians, Buffalo, Brockport, Blacks And Buffalonians: Bloody Battle And Peaceful Protest Against The Vietnam War In Western New York, Joshua Baker

Papers on the History of the College at Brockport

An honors thesis that examines the era of Vietnam War protests at two campuses, that of the College at Brockport, and the University at Buffalo.


Time Lines Spring 2005, Teri Rombaut Apr 2005

Time Lines Spring 2005, Teri Rombaut

History Newsletters

The Spring 2006 Time Lines welcomes new faculty Dr. Katherine Clark and Dr. Meredith Roman, celebrates faculty accomplishments, student achievements, and news from emeriti and alumni.

Volume 16 Issue 1


C. Bruce Lee, Class Of 1944, Rose Archives, College At Brockport Jan 1944

C. Bruce Lee, Class Of 1944, Rose Archives, College At Brockport

Student Reminisces

C. Bruce Lee was part of a group of three African-American students who came to Brockport in the fall of 1940 as part of a New Deal era educational opportunity program. Mr. Lee was from Buffalo, and while he only spent the one year at Brockport before transferring he paints a vivid picture of life at the school, and the experience of being one of only a few African Americans here.

He also has the distinction of recalling meeting Fannie Barrier Williams and her sister Ella, women who in their day had been notable advocates for African American and women ...