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General Charles Lord Cornwallis And The British Southern Strategy, Anne Midgley Nov 2016

General Charles Lord Cornwallis And The British Southern Strategy, Anne Midgley

Saber and Scroll

General Charles Lord Cornwallis’s temper snapped—as did the sword blade upon which he was leaning—as he listened to a humbled Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton relate to him the details of his defeat at a backwoods pasture known as Hannah’s Cowpens. The American rebels, led by Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, had trounced the British. Tarleton’s losses were appalling, perhaps as high as eighty percent of the men he had led into battle, which represented nearly twenty-five percent of the army led by Cornwallis. Tarleton left behind over one hundred dead and nearly eight hundred men whom ...


Huguenots And The French Enlightenment, Allison Ramsey Jan 2016

Huguenots And The French Enlightenment, Allison Ramsey

Saber and Scroll

Excerpted on author's behalf:

When Louis XIV inherited the throne in 1643, the French Protestants, or Huguenots, found themselves in a difficult situation. The Sun King effectively ended all hope for Protestantism in France with the Edict of Fontainebleau—or the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes—in 1685. Even though Catholics and Protestants alike were weary of fighting within the country, they could not agree upon a peaceable co-existence. This led to a grand migration of Protestants in search of a better life in other areas of the world. Eventually, with the help of popular philosophe opinion, the ...


The Making Of The Medieval Papacy: The Gregorian Mission To Kent, Jack Morato Jan 2016

The Making Of The Medieval Papacy: The Gregorian Mission To Kent, Jack Morato

Saber and Scroll

Excerpted on author's behalf:

In the mid-fifth century, the western portion of the Roman Empire had suffered an unrecoverable collapse, and Roman Christianity was supplanted in the provinces with either the pagan animism of the Anglo-Saxons and Franks or the heretical Arianism of the Goths and Vandals. Pope Leo's bold proclamation of papal and Roman Catholic leadership did not coincide with social and political realities; he was writing at a time when the Roman Church held influence in Italy but little elsewhere. Establishing the authority of the Roman See in the Germanic kingdoms that occupied approximately what is ...


Mercenaries And The Congo Crisis, Patrick S. Baker May 2015

Mercenaries And The Congo Crisis, Patrick S. Baker

Saber and Scroll

In the mid-twentieth century, the best market for mercenaries was the newly independent Republic of the Congo. Indeed, within Africa the 1960s were a “golden age” of mercenarism. This paper will examine the specific circumstances during the Congo Crisis of 1960-67 that precipitated this new heyday of the mercenary, the responses to this new mercenarism, and mercenarism as a military, political, and economic phenomenon in post-colonial Congo. By focusing on the Congo Crisis, this paper will illustrate the circumstances that encourage the wide-scale use of mercenary soldiers and will examine counter-mercenary operations. Further, it will explore mercenarism as a driver ...


Book Reviews: Volume 2, Issue 4, Various Authors Apr 2015

Book Reviews: Volume 2, Issue 4, Various Authors

Saber and Scroll

The following book reviews are included:

  • Stephen McFarland and Wesley Newton's To Command the Sky: The Battle for Air Superiority over Germany, 1942-1944, reviewed by Chris Booth
  • Alex Von Tunzelmann's Red Heat: Conspiracy, Murder, and the Cold War in the Caribbean, reviewed by E. Michael Davis II
  • David McCullough's 1776, reviewed by Jordan Griffith
  • Christopher A. Snyder's The Britons, reviewed by Kathleen Guler
  • James Axtell's Beyond 1492: Encounters in Colonial North America, reviewed by Kay O’Pry-Reynolds
  • Carla Gardina Pestana's Protestant Empire: Religion and the Making of the British Atlantic World, reviewed by Ken ...


The Early Years Of Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson And The Impact On His Life, Beth White Apr 2015

The Early Years Of Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson And The Impact On His Life, Beth White

Saber and Scroll

Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, who would become a feared but beloved military officer, loving husband and father, church deacon and stern professor came from a family that was made up of alcoholics, gamblers and thieves. Just in the first seven years of Jackson’s life, there were more challenges and obstacles that had to be overcome than most people experience in an entire lifetime. What made Jackson a unique individual was not that there were severe obstacles, but instead how the young boy handled each circumstance when handed major challenges.


Who Got Stuck With The Bill?, Leigh-Anne Yacovelli Apr 2015

Who Got Stuck With The Bill?, Leigh-Anne Yacovelli

Saber and Scroll

The Federalists’ plan to reduce the new nation’s debt resulted in several crises, one of which was the Whiskey Rebellion. The events that unfolded in western Pennsylvania could have happened along any of the frontier areas. Virginia and Tennessee both felt the effects of the whiskey tax, but Pennsylvania, with its system of government that was the closest to true democracy, seemed to draw the most attention from government leaders. The residents of western Pennsylvania fought for the acknowledgement of their needs by the leaders in the eastern part of the state. Specifically, the “Whiskey Boys,” some of the ...


The Impact Of Lynchburg, Virginia Upon The Confederacy During The Civil War, Bethany L. White Feb 2015

The Impact Of Lynchburg, Virginia Upon The Confederacy During The Civil War, Bethany L. White

Master's Capstone Theses

The following is a study of the impact that one specific city had upon not only Virginia, but also upon the entire Confederacy throughout the four years of the American Civil War. The study takes a careful look at how Lynchburg, a small city located in south-central Virginia played a very significant part and provided tremendous support to the military and Confederate government. The paper includes a review of the early years and how the introduction of the tobacco crop brought the small town in 1786 to a booming city that rivaled both Richmond and Petersburg in wealth and exports ...