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Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society May 2022

Book Reviews, Florida Historical Society

Florida Historical Quarterly

Balsera and May, eds., La Florida: Five Hundred Years of Hispanic Presence. by Erin W. Stone; Little, The Origins of Southern Evangelicalism: Religious Revivalism in the South Carolina Lowcountry, 1670-1760. by Edward Bond; Murray, The Charleston Orphan House: Children's Lives in the First Public Orphanage in America. by Monique Bourque; Gleeson, The Green and the Gray: The Irish in the Confederate States of America. by Ian Delahanty; Harris and Berry, eds., Slavery and Freedom in Savannah. by Michael Benjamin; Monroe, Mary Ann Carroll, First Lady of the Highwaymen. by Paul S. George; Dorsey, Fourth Down in Dunbar. by Richard C. …


The Evolution Of Frederick Douglass’ Slavery Debate: An Examination Of His Rhetoric, Jacquelyn Torres May 2022

The Evolution Of Frederick Douglass’ Slavery Debate: An Examination Of His Rhetoric, Jacquelyn Torres

Political Science & International Studies | Senior Theses

From leading the Abolitionist movement to holding a lecture tour abroad, Frederick Douglass is well known for championing racial justice and leaving a legacy of exposing the evils of slavery. Scholars have primarily focused on Douglass’ actions as an abolitionist but not on the evolution of his thinking about slavery. While Douglass’ actions, such as in the Abolitionist movement, are discussed in-depth amongst academic circles, there is oversight regarding looking at his arguments about slavery. Douglass’ rhetoric was impacted by his experiences traveling abroad when he gave lectures in the British Isles between 1845-1847. This thesis examines speeches given by …


The Failure Of Religious Conversion: Mormon Missionaries In Ireland Between 1850 And 1870, Hadleigh F. Weber Apr 2022

The Failure Of Religious Conversion: Mormon Missionaries In Ireland Between 1850 And 1870, Hadleigh F. Weber

Student Research Projects

Ireland in 1850 was full of empty potato fields and people that were closer to death than their next meal. The country was in the throes of one of the worst famines in history. The Irish Potato Famine decreased the population of Ireland by 20-25% between 1845 and 1851. Despite the bleak time in the country's history, missionaries of different religions continued to flock to Ireland in hopes of converting the dwindling population. Missionaries were almost always met with resistance from both the largely Catholic population and the minority Protestant population. These denominations had a long history of conflict with …


Irish Potato Famine: 1845-51, George Brown Iii Jan 2022

Irish Potato Famine: 1845-51, George Brown Iii

The Exposition

No abstract provided.