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Hierarchies And Levels Of Reality, Patrick Mcgivern, Alexander Rueger Jan 2010

Hierarchies And Levels Of Reality, Patrick Mcgivern, Alexander Rueger

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

We examine some assumptions about the nature of 'levels of reality' in the light of examples drawn from physics. Three central assumptions of the standard view of such levels (for instance, Oppenheim and Putnam 1958) are (i) that levels are populated by entities of varying complexity, (ii) that there is a unique hierarchy of levels, ranging from the very small to the very large, and (iii) that the inhabitants of adjacent levels are related bu the parthood relation. Using examples from physics, we argue that it is more natural to view the inhabitants of levels as the behaviors of entities ...


The Portrayal Of Aboriginal Spiritual Identity In Tourism Advertising: Creating An Image Of Extraordinary Reality Or Mere Confusion?, Alan A. Pomering Jan 2010

The Portrayal Of Aboriginal Spiritual Identity In Tourism Advertising: Creating An Image Of Extraordinary Reality Or Mere Confusion?, Alan A. Pomering

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

This paper considers how Aboriginal identity and spirituality are appropriated to construct national identity for an Australian tourism advertising campaign, and proposes a research agenda to investigate whether incongruity, based on consumers’ prior knowledge of Indigenous Australians’ real everyday identity, might reduce advertising effectiveness.


'That's Not Reality For Me': Australian Audiences Respond To The Biggest Loser, Kate Holland, Richard Warwick Blood, Samantha Thomas, Asuntha Karunaratne, Sophie Lewis Jan 2010

'That's Not Reality For Me': Australian Audiences Respond To The Biggest Loser, Kate Holland, Richard Warwick Blood, Samantha Thomas, Asuntha Karunaratne, Sophie Lewis

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This paper focuses on how Australian audiences who meet the BMI criteria of being obese or morbidly obese read the television program The Biggest Loser. The study consisted of 152 semi-structured interviews in which people were asked about media representations of obesity in general and The Biggest Loser in particular. Four central themes emerged from our analysis of the interview data: Showing the struggle; Watching the transformation; Creating unrealistic expectations; Reinforcing misconceptions and exploiting people. Many people were reflexive about their complicity as viewers in a process in which obese people, like themselves, are ridiculed and humiliated and, while many ...