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Comparative and Foreign Law

Comparative and Foreign Law

Gregory S. Gordon

Publication Year

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When “One Country, Two Systems” Meets “One Person, One Vote”: The Law Of Treaties In The Crucible Of Hong Kong’S Election Crisis, Gregory S. Gordon Aug 2015

When “One Country, Two Systems” Meets “One Person, One Vote”: The Law Of Treaties In The Crucible Of Hong Kong’S Election Crisis, Gregory S. Gordon

Gregory S. Gordon

In Hong Kong’s recent election crisis, an uprising against China’s pre-selecting candidates for Chief Executive and thus foreclosing civic-nomination, both sides (establishment and pro-democracy) have attempted to interpret the term “universal suffrage” based exclusively on its inclusion in Hong Kong’s mini-constitution, the Basic Law. In so doing, however, they have given short shrift to the agreement that gave rise to the Basic Law in the first place: the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration. But while the Joint Declaration provides important textual insights, it simultaneously raises significant issues regarding application of the law of treaties. For example, did the ...


Speech Along The Atrocity Spectrum, Gregory S. Gordon Feb 2013

Speech Along The Atrocity Spectrum, Gregory S. Gordon

Gregory S. Gordon

In the abstract, speech may have much intrinsic value with its power to facilitate democracy, self-actualization, and good will. But, in certain contexts, it can also be quite deleterious, spawning division, ignorance, and hatred. Within the crucible of atrocity, speech may be similarly Janus-faced. Its power to prevent mass violence is indubitable. But its capacity for enabling mass violence is similarly unquestionable. So the issue arises: when and how may speech work for good or ill in relation to atrocity? This Article grapples with that question. And, in doing so, it finds that the relationship between speech and atrocity should ...