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Series

2006

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

Marketing

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

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Student Experiences And Perceptions Of Team-Teaching In A Large Undergraduate Class, Venkata K. Yanamandram, G. Noble Jun 2006

Student Experiences And Perceptions Of Team-Teaching In A Large Undergraduate Class, Venkata K. Yanamandram, G. Noble

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

This paper examines student experiences and perceptions of two models of team-teaching employed at a regional Australian university to teach a large undergraduate marketing subject. The two team-teaching models adopted for use in this subject can be characterised by the large number of team members (ten and six) and the relatively low level of team involvement in the planning and administration of the team-teaching process. The paper examines students' experiences in an effort to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the team-teaching approach from the students' perspective. This paper contributes to our knowledge of teaching practice by identifying, amongst other ...


Turning Marketing Promises Into Business Value: The Experience Of An Industrial Sme, Victoria Little, Judith Motion, Rod Brodie, Richard Brookes Jan 2006

Turning Marketing Promises Into Business Value: The Experience Of An Industrial Sme, Victoria Little, Judith Motion, Rod Brodie, Richard Brookes

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

How can businesses create more value for their customers and shareholders? One way of understanding this task is to apply the promises framework: promises made to customers, promises kept, and promises enabled. Traditionally marketers made the promises, leaving keeping and enabling activities to other departments (e.g. logistics, manufacturing and customer service) and to senior management. However, marketers are increasingly acknowledging that creating and delivering value to customers requires a synchronised effort from the whole firm, not only marketers.


Communication And Conflict Between Marketing And R&D During New Product Development Projects, Graham R. Massey, Elias Kyriazis Jan 2006

Communication And Conflict Between Marketing And R&D During New Product Development Projects, Graham R. Massey, Elias Kyriazis

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

Effective cross-functional working relationships (CFRs) between Marketing Managers and R&D Managers are a key factor in successful new product development (NPD). Empirical evidence suggests however, that this CFR is often problematic. This article adds to our knowledge about Marketing/R&D CFRs during NPD by examining the effects of three forms of communication (communication frequency, bidirectionality, and quality) on two forms of conflict (dysfunctional and functional conflict). A hypothesised model of Marketing/R&D CFRs is tested using a sample of 184 NPD projects conducted in Australia, using R&D Managers as key respondents reporting on their relationships with ...


Maintaining Social Marketing's Relevance: A Dualistic Approach, Gary I. Noble Jan 2006

Maintaining Social Marketing's Relevance: A Dualistic Approach, Gary I. Noble

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

There have been calls amongst academics and practitioners to move social marketing 'upstream'. This paper attempts to clarify what upstream social marketing is, its appropriate relationship with ‘downstream’ social marketing and how both approaches can be combined into a suitable theoretical framework. The paper argues that neither up or downstream social marketing is superior and suggests that a dual, synergistic approach is needed. This argument is supported through reference to current social marketing interventions in the areas of road safety and childhood obesity. The paper concludes by suggesting that Polonsky, Carlson and Fry’s (2003) ‘harm chain’ concept may be ...