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2006

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

Change

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N-Gens Of Change: Personal Response Systems And Net-Generation Students, Brian Murphy, Ciorstan J. Smark Jan 2006

N-Gens Of Change: Personal Response Systems And Net-Generation Students, Brian Murphy, Ciorstan J. Smark

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

Personal Response Systems are a technology similar to use to a television remote control or a mobile telephone for sending SMS messages. They enable almost instant communication between student and instructor in lecture situations. This paper examines the claims made by Personal Response Systems and considers whether they may be especially appropriate to the preferences and expectations of Net- Generation students. The Net-Generation (also known as N-Gens) is made up of students born between 1981 and 2001. They now make up the bulk of finance students in universities across our region. But have we really adapted our lecturing styles to ...


Change Management, Patrick M. Dawson Jan 2006

Change Management, Patrick M. Dawson

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

A key aim of change management is to manage processes towards a future that, even when anticipated and planned for, can never be fully foreseen. It is a paradox that continues to generate considerable debate and conceptual and definitional confusion.


Whose Story Is This? The Selective Retelling Of Organizational Change, Patrick M. Dawson, David Buchanan Jan 2006

Whose Story Is This? The Selective Retelling Of Organizational Change, Patrick M. Dawson, David Buchanan

Faculty of Commerce - Papers (Archive)

Organizational change is a multi-authored process in which respondent and research narratives have causal as well as documentary and explanatory properties, shaping reputations and seeking to colour the nature and direction of future actions. We argue that academic case study narratives are too readily excluded from analysis and regarded as unproblematic solutions to logistical questions of data analysis. However, intervention narratives typically rely on respondent accounts that exhibit inconsistencies and are attributable to personal sense making, impression management, and political agendas. By drawing on processual and narrative approaches, we show how coherent narratives of change are achieved despite such inconsistencies ...