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Immigration Status And The Best Interests Of The Child Standard, Kerry Abrams Jan 2006

Immigration Status And The Best Interests Of The Child Standard, Kerry Abrams

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Legal Issues In Coalition Warfare: A U.S. Perspective, Charles J. Dunlap Jr. Jan 2006

Legal Issues In Coalition Warfare: A U.S. Perspective, Charles J. Dunlap Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Unwarranted Conclusions Drawn From Vincent V. Lake Erie Transportation Co. Concerning The Defense Of Necessity, George C. Christie Jan 2006

The Unwarranted Conclusions Drawn From Vincent V. Lake Erie Transportation Co. Concerning The Defense Of Necessity, George C. Christie

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Dunlap’S Very Subjective Reading List For Air Force Judge Advocates, Charles J. Dunlap Jr. Jan 2006

Dunlap’S Very Subjective Reading List For Air Force Judge Advocates, Charles J. Dunlap Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Conservative Case For Federalism, Ernest A. Young Jan 2006

The Conservative Case For Federalism, Ernest A. Young

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Story Of Ingersoll-Rand V. Ciavatta: Employee Inventors In Corporate Research & Development — Reconciling Innovation With Entrepreneurship, Catherine Fisk Jan 2006

The Story Of Ingersoll-Rand V. Ciavatta: Employee Inventors In Corporate Research & Development — Reconciling Innovation With Entrepreneurship, Catherine Fisk

Faculty Scholarship

Most inventors work as employees for the majority of their careers and are often required as a condition of employment to sign a contract drafted by the firm's lawyers giving the firm exclusive control over as broad a range of economically valuable information and innovation that the lawyers think is legally feasible. Such contracts typically claim as firm property - both during and after an employee's term of employment - the nebulous category of "proprietary information," along with the slightly more clearly (though still poorly) defined category of "trade secrets." These contracts, variously known as "invention assignment agreements" or "holdover ...


Who’S Afraid Of The Apa? What The Patent System Can Learn From Administrative Law, Stuart M. Benjamin, Arti K. Rai Jan 2006

Who’S Afraid Of The Apa? What The Patent System Can Learn From Administrative Law, Stuart M. Benjamin, Arti K. Rai

Faculty Scholarship

In recent years, widespread dissatisfaction with the perceived poor quality of issued patents has spurred a diverse range of groups to call for reform of administrative procedures. Strikingly, however, most calls for reform pay little attention to principles of administrative law. Similarly, judges (in particular the judges of the Federal Circuit) have treated patent law as an exception to the Administrative Procedure Act, and to administrative law more generally. In this Article, Professors Benjamin and Rai contend that this treatment is doctrinally incorrect and normatively undesirable. Standard principles of administrative law provide the appropriate approach for judicial review in the ...


The Functional Method Of Comparative Law, Ralf Michaels Jan 2006

The Functional Method Of Comparative Law, Ralf Michaels

Faculty Scholarship

The functional method has become both the mantra and the bete noire of contemporary comparative law. The debate over the functional method is the focal point of almost all discussions about the field of comparative law as a whole, about centers and peripheries of scholarly projects and interests, about mainstream and avant-garde, about ethnocentrism and orientalism, about convergence and pluralism, about technocratic instrumentalism and cultural awareness, etc. Not surprisingly, this functional method is a chimera, both as theory and as practice of comparative law. In fact, "the functional method" is a trifold misnomer: There is not one ("the") functional method ...


Storming The Castle To Save The Children: The Ironic Costs Of A Child Welfare Exception To The Fourth Amendment, Doriane Lambelet Coleman Jan 2006

Storming The Castle To Save The Children: The Ironic Costs Of A Child Welfare Exception To The Fourth Amendment, Doriane Lambelet Coleman

Faculty Scholarship

This article first sets out the child welfare system's assumption that there is a child welfare exception to the Fourth Amendment and then describes the ways it is used to facilitate child maltreatment investigations. It goes on to analyze the validity of this assumption according to current Fourth Amendment doctrine including under the special needs administrative exception. (This analysis may be particularly useful to both family/children's law scholars as well as to Fourth Amendment scholars, as it examines all of the state and federal appellate cases addressing the subject, and provides a most up-to-date evaluation of the ...


History, Human Nature, And Property Regimes: Filling In The Civilizing Argument, Jedediah Purdy Jan 2006

History, Human Nature, And Property Regimes: Filling In The Civilizing Argument, Jedediah Purdy

Faculty Scholarship

Comment on Carol Rose's 2005 Childress Lecture


A Tribute To Mel Shimm, Barak D. Richman Jan 2006

A Tribute To Mel Shimm, Barak D. Richman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Better Regulation In Europe, Jonathan B. Wiener Jan 2006

Better Regulation In Europe, Jonathan B. Wiener

Faculty Scholarship

"Better Regulation" is afoot in Europe. After several transatlantic conflicts over regulatory topics such as the precautionary principle, genetically modified foods, and climate change, Europe and America now appear to be converging on the analytic basis for regulation. In a process of hybridization, European institutions are borrowing "Better Regulation" reforms from both the US approach to regulatory review using benefit-cost analysis and from European member states' initiatives on administrative costs and simplification; in turn the European Commission is helping to spread these reforms among the member states. In many respects, the Better Regulation initiative promises salutary reforms, such as wider ...


The News Media’S Influence On Criminal Justice Policy: How Market Driven News Promotes Punitiveness, Sara Sun Beale Jan 2006

The News Media’S Influence On Criminal Justice Policy: How Market Driven News Promotes Punitiveness, Sara Sun Beale

Faculty Scholarship

This Article argues that commercial pressures are determining the news media's contemporary treatment of crime and violence, and that the resulting coverage has played a major role in reshaping public opinion, and ultimately, criminal justice policy. The news media are not mirrors, simply reflecting events in society. Rather, media content is shaped by economic and marketing considerations that frequently override traditional journalistic criteria for newsworthiness. This Article explores local and national television's treatment of crime, where the extent and style of news stories about crime are being adjusted to meet perceived viewer demand and advertising strategies, which frequently ...


Brief Amici Curiae In Support Of Respondent, Phillip Morris, Usa, Neil Vidmar Jan 2006

Brief Amici Curiae In Support Of Respondent, Phillip Morris, Usa, Neil Vidmar

Faculty Scholarship

Brief of Neil Vidmar, et al. Amici Curiae in support of Respondent, Phillip Morris, USA v. Williams, No. 15-1256 (U.S. Supreme Court, September 15, 2006) In Williams v. Philip Morris (1999) an Oregon jury awarded the plaintiff $800,000 in compensatory damages and $79.5 million in punitive damages, a verdict upheld by the Oregon Supreme Court, but appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court (oral argument set for Oct 31, 2006). Critics of punitive damages argue that (a) juries are incompetent, irrational or biased in awarding punitive damages and (b) judges and appellate courts fail to police excessive ...


Eu Law As Private International Law? Re-Conceptualising The Country-Of-Origin Principle As Vested Rights Theory, Ralf Michaels Jan 2006

Eu Law As Private International Law? Re-Conceptualising The Country-Of-Origin Principle As Vested Rights Theory, Ralf Michaels

Faculty Scholarship

One of the most pertinent issues in contemporary European conflict of laws is the tension between Community law and traditional choice of law rules. The biggest problem comes not from the transposition of member state rules on choice of law into methodologically comparable EC Regulations, but rather from the so-called country-of-origin principle. This principle holds, broadly, that EU member states may not impose obligations on a provider of goods and services that go beyond the obligations imposed by the provider's home state. Originally conceived mainly with public law obligations in mind, the principle has an impact on choice of ...


The Oligopolistic Gatekeeper: The U.S. Accounting Profession, James D. Cox Jan 2006

The Oligopolistic Gatekeeper: The U.S. Accounting Profession, James D. Cox

Faculty Scholarship

The accounting and financial scandals the last few years not only produced the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, but have prompted a good deal of debate what forces led to so many dramatic reporting failures. This article is the only work to examine how the competitive structure of the accounting industry contributed to its movement from being a profession to a business that performed auditing. In the article we find not only documentation that the accounting profession is an oligopoly but a sound explanation of how its poor structure contributes significantly to negative social welfare. Throughout the article provides rich support of data ...


The Executive And The Avoidance Canon, H. Jefferson Powell Jan 2006

The Executive And The Avoidance Canon, H. Jefferson Powell

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Universal Rights And Wrongs, Michael E. Tigar Jan 2006

Universal Rights And Wrongs, Michael E. Tigar

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Assessing Chief Justice William Rehnquist, Erwin Chemerinsky Jan 2006

Assessing Chief Justice William Rehnquist, Erwin Chemerinsky

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Assault On The Constitution: Executive Power And The War On Terrorism, Erwin Chemerinsky Jan 2006

The Assault On The Constitution: Executive Power And The War On Terrorism, Erwin Chemerinsky

Faculty Scholarship

The Bush administration has made unprecedented claims of unchecked executive power. The Constitution reflects a simple model that two branches of government should have to be involved in virtually all major government actions. The Bush administration, however, has claimed the ability to detain individuals, to engage in electronic eavesdropping, and to authorize torture even in violation of federal statutes. The solution must be for courts to reject these broad claims of presidential authority.


The Players Have Lost That Argument: Doping, Drug Testing, And Collective Bargaining, Paul H. Haagen Jan 2006

The Players Have Lost That Argument: Doping, Drug Testing, And Collective Bargaining, Paul H. Haagen

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Model State Mass Tort Settlement Statute, Francis Mcgovern Jan 2006

A Model State Mass Tort Settlement Statute, Francis Mcgovern

Faculty Scholarship

Abstract not available


The New Biopolitics: Autonomy, Demography, And Nationhood, Jedediah Purdy Jan 2006

The New Biopolitics: Autonomy, Demography, And Nationhood, Jedediah Purdy

Faculty Scholarship

In India and China, a population gap has opened between young men and women. There are now about 100 million more men than women in those countries and a few of their neighbors. Many of the "missing women" either were never born because of sex-selective abortion or died in childhood because families devote more medical and other resources to boys. "Missing women" mean men who will never marry. Socially unintegrated young men are associated with a variety of social pathologies; most importantly, they are the prime recruitment targets of nationalist and fundamentalist political groups. Conservative and reactionaries have always argued ...


Loaded Dice And Other Problems: A Further Reflection On The Statutory Commander In Chief, Christopher H. Schroeder Jan 2006

Loaded Dice And Other Problems: A Further Reflection On The Statutory Commander In Chief, Christopher H. Schroeder

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Kelo’S Moral Failure, Laura S. Underkuffler Jan 2006

Kelo’S Moral Failure, Laura S. Underkuffler

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Look Back At The Rehnquist Era And An Overview Of The 2004 Supreme Court Term, Erwin Chemerinsky Jan 2006

A Look Back At The Rehnquist Era And An Overview Of The 2004 Supreme Court Term, Erwin Chemerinsky

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Checks And Balances: Congress And The Federal Court, Paul D. Carrington Jan 2006

Checks And Balances: Congress And The Federal Court, Paul D. Carrington

Faculty Scholarship

This essay was published as a chapter in Reforming the Supreme Court: Term Limits for Justices (Paul D. Carrington & Roger Cramton eds, Carolina Academic Press 2006). Its point is that Congress has long neglected its duty implicit in the constitutional doctrine of separation of powers to constrain the tendency of the Court, the academy and the legal profession to inflate the Court's status and power. The term "life tenure" is a significant source of a sense of royal status having not only the adverse cultural effects noted by Nagel, but also doleful effects on the administration and enforcement of ...


Preclearance, Discrimination, And The Department Of Justice: The Case Of South Carolina, Guy-Uriel Charles, Luis Fuentes-Rohwer Jan 2006

Preclearance, Discrimination, And The Department Of Justice: The Case Of South Carolina, Guy-Uriel Charles, Luis Fuentes-Rohwer

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Reining In The Data Traders: A Tort For The Misuse Of Personal Information, Sarah Ludington Jan 2006

Reining In The Data Traders: A Tort For The Misuse Of Personal Information, Sarah Ludington

Faculty Scholarship

In 2005, three spectacular data security breaches focused public attention on the vast databases of personal information held by data traders such as ChoicePoint and LexisNexis, and the vulnerability of that data. The personal information of hundreds of thousands of people had either been hacked or sold to identity thieves, yet the data traders refused to reveal to those people the specifics of the information sold or stolen. While Congress and many state legislatures swiftly introduced bills to force data traders to be more accountable to their data subjects, fewer states actually enacted laws, and none of the federal bills ...


Does Falling Smoking Lead To Rising Obesity?, Jonathan Gruber, Michael D. Frakes Jan 2006

Does Falling Smoking Lead To Rising Obesity?, Jonathan Gruber, Michael D. Frakes

Faculty Scholarship

The strong negative correlation over time between smoking rates and obesity have led some to suggest that reduced smoking is increasing weight gain in the U.S.. This conclusion is supported by the findings of Chou et al. (2004), who conclude that higher cigarette prices lead to increased body weight. We investigate this issue and find no evidence that reduced smoking leads to weight gain. Using the cigarette tax rather than the cigarette price and controlling for non-linear time effects, we find a negative effect of cigarette taxes on body weight, implying that reduced smoking leads to lower body weights ...