Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Digital Commons Network

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 691 - 720 of 1530

Full-Text Articles in Entire DC Network

'Once Upon A Time There Was A Wonderful Country': Representations Of History In Rwanda, Deborah Mayersen Jan 2014

'Once Upon A Time There Was A Wonderful Country': Representations Of History In Rwanda, Deborah Mayersen

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In April 1994, genocide erupted in Rwanda with an unprecedented ferocity. Over the course of 100 days, more than 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutu were killed. A major contributor to the violence was an intense propaganda campaign that dehumanised and demonised the Tutsi minority prior to and during the genocide. This propaganda presented the Tutsi as foreign and feudal oppressors, who would again oppress the Hutu majority as they had in the past if they were not targeted for extermination. Such dubious representations of history have deep roots in Rwanda, which can be traced to the early colonial period ...


Erecting Malaysia's Maritime Fence Over The Straits Of Malacca And Singapore, Mohd Hazmi Bin Mohd Rusli, Abdul Ghafur Hamid Khin Maung Sein, Wan Izatul Asma Binti Wan Talaat, Maizatun Binti Mustafa Jan 2014

Erecting Malaysia's Maritime Fence Over The Straits Of Malacca And Singapore, Mohd Hazmi Bin Mohd Rusli, Abdul Ghafur Hamid Khin Maung Sein, Wan Izatul Asma Binti Wan Talaat, Maizatun Binti Mustafa

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Malaysia shares the Straits of Malacca and Singapore with Indonesia, Singapore and briefly, with Thailand. Before colonial times, there were no proper maritime boundary delimitation within the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. The Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1824 has divided the Straits of Malacca and Singapore into two spheres of dominions, which later on became the basis of modern territories of Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore. Since independence in 1957, Malaysia has been working closely with Thailand, Indonesia and Singapore to properly demarcate maritime boundary lines in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore. Nevertheless, there are still unresolved issues between these littoral ...


Business-Managed Democracy: The Transnational Class, Sharon Beder Jan 2014

Business-Managed Democracy: The Transnational Class, Sharon Beder

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

“The rise of corporate power and the increasing importance accorded to markets mean that transnational corporations are eclipsing the nation state as the driving force behind policy-making. Free trade has been given precedence over goals such as environmental protection, improved working conditions, affordable and accessible electricity and water, universal health care and schooling.”


Back To The Classroom: Language Educators Learning A Language, Lidia Bilbatua, Laetitia Vedrenne, Rowena G. Ward Jan 2014

Back To The Classroom: Language Educators Learning A Language, Lidia Bilbatua, Laetitia Vedrenne, Rowena G. Ward

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

As part of our preparation for this presentation, we undertook research into the field of teachers as students etc but there is virtually none irrespective of language or other. Research on the motivation of students and teachers and the differences between teachers’ beliefs and their actual classroom practice is ample but there is virtually nothing on teachers as students and the impact that being a student had on their teaching practise etc. In some ways, it seems that once you are a language teacher, you are expected to remember what it is like to study a language – from our experience ...


Theatrical Jurisprudence And The Imaginary Lives Of Law In Pre-1945 Australia, Marett Leiboff Jan 2014

Theatrical Jurisprudence And The Imaginary Lives Of Law In Pre-1945 Australia, Marett Leiboff

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

If there is anything like an imagined pre-1945 past in Australia, it is one steeped in an Anglophone legal ascendancy. But this is an imaginary past in so many ways. Non-British Europeans came to Australia long before 1945. These earlier Europeans were marked by differences of voice and face, but were eager British subjects, as likely to actively take advantage of law as they were to be subjected to its strictures. By theatricalising their ordinary and extraordinary legal lives through archive and memory, we are reminded that there is more to law of the South than formal accounts which have ...


The Ultra Syndrome: Did It Hamper The Search For Flight Mh370?, Sam Bateman Jan 2014

The Ultra Syndrome: Did It Hamper The Search For Flight Mh370?, Sam Bateman

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Ultra was the Allies' name for highly classified intelligence information obtained during World War Two by breaking encrypted enemy radio communications. “It was thanks to Ultra that we won the war,” Winston Churchill is reported to have told King George VI.

Much German radio traffic was encrypted on the Enigma machine, many codes of which the British could decipher. The downside was that military commanders sometimes could not act on Ultra intelligence because it might give away to the Germans that the Allies had access to Enigma traffic.

For example, during the Battle of Crete in 1941, the Allied commander ...


Maritime Outlaws, Rowan Cahill Jan 2014

Maritime Outlaws, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

For thirty-odd years, American historian Marcus Rediker (University of Pittsburgh) has been writing about the sea, deep-sea sailing ships, seafaring proletariats, and seafaring rebels, during the seventeenth through to the early nineteenth centuries. Internationally, his landmark study of sailors, mutineers, and pirates, Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea (1987), is widely acknowledged as a major ‘history from below’, that genre of historical writing dealing with people traditionally written out of ruling class histories which glorify and enshrine the wealthy, the propertied, and the interests of the state.


Submission To United Nations Committee On The Rights Of Persons With Disabilities Draft General Comment On Article 12 – Equal Recognition Before The Law, Fleur Beaupert, Linda Roslyn Steele Jan 2014

Submission To United Nations Committee On The Rights Of Persons With Disabilities Draft General Comment On Article 12 – Equal Recognition Before The Law, Fleur Beaupert, Linda Roslyn Steele

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

We support the Draft General Comment on Article 12 – Equal Recognition Before the Law (‘Draft General Comment’). Our submission is primarily concerned with drawing the Committee’s attention to issues around mental capacity. We argue that despite the Committee’s urging in the Draft General Comment for a split between legal capacity and mental capacity, mental capacity (and the related disciplines, professions, institutions and practices of psychology, psychiatry and neuropsychology through which mental capacity is defined and assessed) will continue to have cultural and material significance to the realisation of article 12 and the human rights of people with disability ...


"If You Can Hold On...": Counter-Apocalyptic Play In Richard Kelly’S Southland Tales, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2014

"If You Can Hold On...": Counter-Apocalyptic Play In Richard Kelly’S Southland Tales, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Richard Kelly’s Southland Tales (2006) presents a dystopic, post-apocalyptic, near-future through an aesthetic, which fuses contemporary postmodern screens with the phantasmagorical of traditional apocalyptic visions. This article argues that Southland Tales is an example of what feminist theologian Catherine Keller calls the “counter-apocalyptic” (Keller 1996:19-20). Through strategies of ironic parody Kelly both describes and questions the apocalyptic and its easy polarities. In situating the film as counter-apocalyptic the paper argues that the film both resists the apocalyptic impulse however it is also located within it. In this sense it produces a unique take on the genre of the ...


Motivations, Learning Activities And Challenges: Learning Mandarin Chinese In Australia, Xiaoping Gao Jan 2014

Motivations, Learning Activities And Challenges: Learning Mandarin Chinese In Australia, Xiaoping Gao

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Mandarin Chinese is ane of the priority languages in the Australian Government's {2012} 'Australia in the Asian Century' White Paper. However the number of Australian learners of Mandarin remains the smallest among six commonly taught foreign languages in Australia. What are Australian learners' motivations and preferred learning activities for learning Mandarin Chinese? What challenges do teachers face when promoting this language? To answer these questions, this study conducted surveys with 149 school students and with 18 principals and language teachers in New South Wales. Results show that the Australian students' study of Mandarin was primarily driven by extrinsic motivation ...


Conclusion: Reflections On The Rhythms Of Internationalisation In Post-Disaster Japan, Vera Mackie Jan 2014

Conclusion: Reflections On The Rhythms Of Internationalisation In Post-Disaster Japan, Vera Mackie

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

On 7 Jul 2012. a concert was held at Makuhari Messe near Tokyo. The concert was part of a growing movement against nuclear power in the wake of the triple earthquake-tsunami-nuclear disaster in northeastern Japan on 11 March 2011. The headline performers were the Japanese band Yellow Magic Orchestra and the German band Kraftwerk. Since the earliest days of Yellow Magic Orchestra. band leader Sakamoto Ryuichi has forged an international career as a performer and composer, moving between Tokyo, New York and other global cities. In recent years, he has used his public profile to argue for environmental sustainability, so ...


The Minerals Resource Rent Tax: The Australian Labor Party And The Continuity Of Change, John Passant Jan 2014

The Minerals Resource Rent Tax: The Australian Labor Party And The Continuity Of Change, John Passant

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to look at the recent history of proposals to tax resource rents in Australia, from Australia's Future Tax System Report (the "Henry Tax Review") through to the proposed Resource Super Profits Tax ("RSPT") and then the Minerals Resource Rent Tax ("MRRT"). The process of change from Henry to the RSPT to the MRRT can best be understood in the context of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) as a capitalist workers' party. The author argues that it is this tension in the ALP, the shift in its internal balance further towards capital and ...


The K-Pop Factory Phenomenon, Brian Yecies, Ae-Gyung Shim Jan 2014

The K-Pop Factory Phenomenon, Brian Yecies, Ae-Gyung Shim

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Across the global music industry and the popular media, “K-pop” is both a buzzword and soft-power concept that encapsulates the astounding success currently enjoyed by Korean cultural contents, in terms of both production and export values. Despite creative input from a variety of international contributors, the meteoric rise of K-pop was not anticipated by most global music industry players.In addition, by circumventing the barriers to entry (and costs) associated with traditional media production and distribution channels dominated by a few major global players, successfully exploiting the promotional space offered by YouTube, and being an early adopter of this new ...


Harry Potter Contra El Legalismo, O La Magia Republicana Del Pluralismo Jurídico, Luis Gomez Romero Jan 2014

Harry Potter Contra El Legalismo, O La Magia Republicana Del Pluralismo Jurídico, Luis Gomez Romero

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This essay undertakes a radical criticism of legalist ideologies through a pluralist revision of the sources of law. Literary texts –specifically, the Harry Potter series of novels– are catalogued as sources of law. For this purpose, the law inscribed in fictional narrative worlds is considered as a matter that concerns the law in the real-world and the lives of audiences who read such fictional worlds. Law is literature and literature is law. On this basis, the article analyzes from a republican perspective the fictionalization of the rule of law in the Potter novels.


Molecular Dynamics Study On The Atomic Mechanisms Of Coupling Motion Of [0 0 1] Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundaries In Copper Bicrystal, Liang Zhang, Cheng Lu, Guillaume Michal, A Kiet Tieu, Kuiyu Cheng Jan 2014

Molecular Dynamics Study On The Atomic Mechanisms Of Coupling Motion Of [0 0 1] Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundaries In Copper Bicrystal, Liang Zhang, Cheng Lu, Guillaume Michal, A Kiet Tieu, Kuiyu Cheng

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Recent research has revealed that some grain boundaries (GBs) can migrate coupled to applied shear stress. In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on sixteen [0 0 1] symmetric tilt GBs of bicrystal Cu to identify atomic-scale GB migration mechanisms and investigate their dependence on GB structure. The misorientation angles (θ) of the sixteen GBs cover the interval from 0° to 90° and a wide range of Σ values. A general method was proposed to explore the possible GB structures for each misorientation angle. Molecular statics simulation at a temperature of 0K were carried out first to determine ...


Book Review: David Grant, Jagged Seas: The New Zealand Seamen's Union, 1879-2003, Rowan Cahill Jan 2014

Book Review: David Grant, Jagged Seas: The New Zealand Seamen's Union, 1879-2003, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Jagged Seas is a commissioned history of the New Zealand Seamen’s Union (rebranded the New Zealand Seafarers’ Union following amalgamation with the Cooks’ and Stewards’ Union in 1990) from its beginnings in 1879 until it merged in 2002/03 with the New Zealand Waterfront Workers’ Union to form the Maritime Union of New Zealand. Author David Grant has a background in journalism and teaching, and a significant publication record in the research and writing of New Zealand labour movement, and dissident, anti-militarist, histories.


‘Calling Our Spirits Home’: Indigenous Cultural Festivals And The Making Of A Good Life, Lisa Slater Jan 2014

‘Calling Our Spirits Home’: Indigenous Cultural Festivals And The Making Of A Good Life, Lisa Slater

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Speaking about the problems affecting Wik youth of Aurukun, Cape York, a local community health worker, Derek Walpo, lamented that ‘their spirits have wandered too far. We need to call them back.’ The poignant reflection was made at a debriefing session following a social and wellbeing festival in Aurukun.1 The five-day event culminated in a Mary G concert, in which almost all the township gathered to laugh and cheer the indomitable Broome ‘lady’. It was not just Mary G’s ribald humour that vitalised and galvanised the crowd, but also her performance that playfully reflected back and validated some ...


Albatross, Graham Barwell Jan 2014

Albatross, Graham Barwell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Albatross looks at the place of these iconic birds in a wide variety of human cultures, from early responses by north Atlantic mariners to modern encounters, examining in detail the role the bird plays in the lives of different peoples and societies. The albatross s remarkable ease in the air and its huge wingspan strikes all those who observe them, and the huge journeys they undertake across the oceans inspires awe. The bird has been celebrated through proverbs, folk stories, art, and ceremony. For many, the bird's cultural significance is still determined by Coleridge's The Rime of the ...


Graduate Students As Proxy Mobbing Targets: Insights From Three Mexican Universities, Florencia Pena Saint Martin, Brian Martin, Hilda Eliazer Aquino Lopez, Lillian Von Der Walde Moheno Jan 2014

Graduate Students As Proxy Mobbing Targets: Insights From Three Mexican Universities, Florencia Pena Saint Martin, Brian Martin, Hilda Eliazer Aquino Lopez, Lillian Von Der Walde Moheno

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Inside universities, struggles between academics often involve mobbing (collective bullying) and suppression of dissent and discontent. Shamefully, in some of these struggles, graduate students become targets of aggression as an indirect method of attacking their supervisors or mentors. Based on anecdotal comments and recollections, it is plausible that there might be hundreds or thousands of cases of this unethical and highly damaging phenomenon, but it has seldom been documented. Our aim is to initiate a discussion of goals, methods, dynamics, and negative impacts of these indirect attacks that use students as proxies and pawns in battles of which, much of ...


Taxation In Australia Up Until 1914: The Warp And Weft Of Protectionism, Caroline Dick Jan 2014

Taxation In Australia Up Until 1914: The Warp And Weft Of Protectionism, Caroline Dick

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article offers an account of the taxing policies in Australia from 1788 up until the beginning of World War I, when the exigencies of the First World War forced the Australian government to reassess its tax policies. During the period from 1788 until 1914, Australia transitioned from being a collection of provincial colonies with their own economic objectives and taxing policies to a Federation with a centrally-directed taxing authority. Whilst this political transition was taking place there was also a transition occurring in government policy concerning the function of taxation in Australia.

Government no longer used taxation just for ...


Hayloft's Thyestes: Adapting Seneca For The Australian Stage And Context, Margaret Hamilton Jan 2014

Hayloft's Thyestes: Adapting Seneca For The Australian Stage And Context, Margaret Hamilton

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This essay examines The Hayloft Project's theatre production Thyestes, first performed at the Malthouse Theatre in Melbourne in 2010. It takes as its starting point public criticism of the practice of adaptation as a derivative form. Contrary to this position, the essay applies recent theorizations of theatre as a hypermedium in order to argue that adaptation is an integral, structural component of theatre rather than simply an intertextual, representational strategy. In doing so, it positions Brechtian approaches to the medium as a historical precedent through which to consider the dramaturgical strategies at work in the production, and it extrapolates ...


Dissent In Science, Brian Martin Jan 2014

Dissent In Science, Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Dissent is questioning or challenging an established idea, practice, or policy. It occurs in all sorts of areas. For example, people can dissent against wars, school rules, or evolutionary theory. Dissent is usually expressed in words, for example in blogs, articles, and speeches, but it can also be expressed in actions or at events, such as a protest rally. Dissent in science can refer to challenges to dominant scientific theories and also questioning of priorities or practices within science, for example, questioning whether a person should have received the Nobel Prize or whether Nobel prizes are a good idea at ...


Radiodoc Review: Developing Critical Theory Of The Radio Documentary And Feature Form, Siobhan Mchugh Jan 2014

Radiodoc Review: Developing Critical Theory Of The Radio Documentary And Feature Form, Siobhan Mchugh

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In 2013, the author founded an online journal, RadioDoc Review, to develop critical theory of the radio documentary/feature form and define production and research excellence in this under-researched field. Its international editorial board, comprising eminent scholars, acclaimed practitioners and key industry figures, selects audio works to be co-reviewed each volume. RadioDoc Review Volume 1 (2014) contains 31,000 words of ground-breaking analysis of the radio documentary/feature form, disseminated under the University of Wollongong's Open Access policy. Via promotion on social media, the journal has developed a significant international following, and the expert reviews have fomented debate in ...


Lobbying, Greenwash And Deliberate Confusion: How Vested Interests Undermine Climate Change, Sharon Beder Jan 2014

Lobbying, Greenwash And Deliberate Confusion: How Vested Interests Undermine Climate Change, Sharon Beder

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Politicians in many nations have not been responsive to community concerns about global warming because of a highly successful corporate campaign of misinformation and persuasion. Corporations that would be affected by measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions set out to confuse and deceive the public and policy-makers on the issue. They use corporate front groups, public relations firms and conservative think tanks to cast doubt on predictions of global warming and its impacts, to imply that governments do not know enough to act, to argue that the cost of reducing greenhouse gases is prohibitively expensive and to promote doubtful solutions ...


Transnational Law And Refugee Identity: The Worldwide Effect Of European Norms, Helene T. Lambert Jan 2014

Transnational Law And Refugee Identity: The Worldwide Effect Of European Norms, Helene T. Lambert

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

No abstract provided.


Vinyl: A History Of The Analogue Record, Andrew Whelan Jan 2014

Vinyl: A History Of The Analogue Record, Andrew Whelan

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article presents a review of the book "Vinyl: A History of the Analogue Record" by Richard Osborne.


Ecological Restoration In The Deep Sea: Desiderata, C Van Dover, J Aronson, L Pendleton, S Smith, S Arnaud-Haond, D Moreno-Mateos, E Barbier, D Billett, K Bowers, R Danovaro, A Edwards, Stephen Kellert, T Morato, E Pollard, A Rogers, Robin Warner Jan 2014

Ecological Restoration In The Deep Sea: Desiderata, C Van Dover, J Aronson, L Pendleton, S Smith, S Arnaud-Haond, D Moreno-Mateos, E Barbier, D Billett, K Bowers, R Danovaro, A Edwards, Stephen Kellert, T Morato, E Pollard, A Rogers, Robin Warner

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

An era of expanding deep-ocean industrialization is before us,with policy makers establishing governance frameworks for sustainable management of deep-sea resources whiles cientists learn more about the ecological structure and functioning of the largest biome on the planet. Missing from discussion of the stewardship of the deep ocean is ecological restoration. If existing activities in the deep sea continue or are expanded and new deep-ocean industries are developed, there is need to consider what is required to minimize or repair resulting damages to the deep-sea environment. In addition, thought should be given as to how any past damage can be ...


Amenity Enhancement And Biodiversity Conservation In Australian Suburbia: Moving Towards Maintaining Indigenous Plants On Private Residential Land, Andrew H. Kelly Jan 2014

Amenity Enhancement And Biodiversity Conservation In Australian Suburbia: Moving Towards Maintaining Indigenous Plants On Private Residential Land, Andrew H. Kelly

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to critically explore the historical background and current approach of the most common statutory instrument to maintain green landscapes in private residential gardens in cities and townships in suburban New South Wales (NSW), Australia.

Design/methodology/approach – The narrative presents a transdisciplinary study. While its emphasis is on law and town planning, it also encompasses local government and legal history while touching upon environmental management and ecological science. This panoply of areas reflects the sheer complexity of the topic. While the presentation is initially descriptive, it moves on to a critique of the ...


The Looming War On Trade Unions, Rowan Cahill Jan 2014

The Looming War On Trade Unions, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In October 2013, the right-wing journal Quadrant published the book Australia’s Secret War, an account by Hal Colebatch of homefront industrial disruptions by Australian trade unions during the Second World War. Described as a secret history rescued from ‘folk memory’ – and one previously suppressed by leftists – it detailed ‘treacherous’ industrial actions by unionists that denied/delayed vital war materials to the frontlines between 1939 and 1945, resulting in the deaths of service personnel. These actions, the argument went, pointed to a deliberate and coordinated attempt at sabotaging the war effort courtesy of the communist leaderships of the unions involved ...


Engendering 'Rural' Practice: Women’S Lived Experience Of Legal Practice In Regional, Rural And Remote Communities In Queensland, Trish Mundy Jan 2014

Engendering 'Rural' Practice: Women’S Lived Experience Of Legal Practice In Regional, Rural And Remote Communities In Queensland, Trish Mundy

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The experience and marginalised status of women lawyers within the Australian legal profession has been well documented over the past two decades. However, very little is known empirically about the ways in which 'rural' space and place might transform or impact that experience, and their relationship with the retention of women in rural, regional and remote (RRR) practice. This article reports on a phenomenological study of the lived experience of female solicitors practising in RRR communities in Queensland. The study asked 23 solicitors (male and female) about their experience of life and legal practice in their communities. This article concludes ...