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Filial Obligation In Contemporary China: Evolution Of The Culture-System, Xiaoying Qi Jan 2014

Filial Obligation In Contemporary China: Evolution Of The Culture-System, Xiaoying Qi

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Family obligation, which has an exceptionally high salience in traditional Chinese society, continues to be significant in contemporary China. In family relations in particular sentiments and practices morphologically similar to those associated with xiao (filial piety) remains intact in so far as an enduring set of expectations concerning age-based obligation continues to structure behavior toward others. Researchers pursuing the theme of “individualization” in Chinese society, on the other hand, argue that family obligations and filial sentiments have substantially weakened. The present paper will show that under conditions of cultural and social change in China filial behavior through family obligation continues ...


Cinema Of Actuality: Japanese Avant-Garde Filmmaking In The Season Of Image Politics By Yuriko Furuhata (Review), Michael Leggett Jan 2014

Cinema Of Actuality: Japanese Avant-Garde Filmmaking In The Season Of Image Politics By Yuriko Furuhata (Review), Michael Leggett

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Japanese word eizo is central to an understanding of the significance of the interventions made into the cultural life of the nation by a relatively small grouping of artists and writers working between the 1950s and 1970s. Traditionally used as a phenomenological term in science and philosophy, the character connoted shadow or silhouette, later shifting to signify optical processes. Like the Greek term tehkne, creativeness and the tools used to achieve the outcome are relative, nuanced and complex.


So Hot Right Now: The Middle Ages In The Climate Change Debate, Louise D'Arcens, Clare Monagle Jan 2014

So Hot Right Now: The Middle Ages In The Climate Change Debate, Louise D'Arcens, Clare Monagle

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

“Medieval” has become the accusation du jour in Australian domestic politics, used with equal conviction across the spectrum to discredit opponents’ views. One debate where this accusation has taken centre stage is over Australia’s response to human-induced climate change.


What’S Killing Tassie Devils If It Isn’T A Contagious Cancer?, Jody Warren, Brian Martin Jan 2014

What’S Killing Tassie Devils If It Isn’T A Contagious Cancer?, Jody Warren, Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Scientists have been trying to figure out the cause of the deadly cancer affecting so many Tasmanian devils but the research doesn’t seem to be providing many useful answers. What if they’re looking in the wrong place for a cause and a cure?

The Tasmanian devil is Australia’s largest carnivorous marsupial. It is currently listed as “endangered” and risks becoming extinct. Most of the devils in Tasmania are developing ugly tumours on their faces due to what is called devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), and it is nearly always fatal.

The disease was first observed in 1996 ...


The Ephemeral Coast: On The Edge Of The Otherly Realm, Ian Buchanan Jan 2014

The Ephemeral Coast: On The Edge Of The Otherly Realm, Ian Buchanan

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The coastline –the space between the ocean and the land– is a both a barrier and an invitation to go beyond the land’s edge and enter an otherly realm. Humans have skated over the water in boats and other kinds of watercraft for thousands of years. But they have always been (and continue to be) reluctant to immerse themselves in the ocean. Despite humanity’s eons long interaction with water, as Charles Sprawson’s marvellous paean to swimming Haunts of the Black Masseur documents, it is only the past 150 years or so that humans have been swimmers and ...


Economics Hijackers Could Do With A History Lesson, Simon Ville Jan 2014

Economics Hijackers Could Do With A History Lesson, Simon Ville

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Behind every economic policy initiative lies a narrative justifying that course of action: immigration increases unemployment; public debt is unsustainable; manufacturing is interminably declining; city growth is out of control.

We have many “narrators” driving these discussions of economics – the media, political parties, public sector bodies, business and indeed universities – each with their own set of interests and values.

Unfortunately, among these claimants, the voice of economic history has remained largely silent or selectively galvanised to prosecute a triumphalist or doomsayer interpretation: “the clever country’s many successes in policy and business”; or “the lucky country’s history has been ...


Food Safety Offenses In New South Wales, Australia: A Critical Appreciation Of Their Complexities, Abu Noman Mohammad Atahar Ali, S M. Solaiman Jan 2014

Food Safety Offenses In New South Wales, Australia: A Critical Appreciation Of Their Complexities, Abu Noman Mohammad Atahar Ali, S M. Solaiman

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Food is essentially a primary need of all life to remain alive. Faults or carelessness of human beings renders foods unsafe, which may cause disease and death. This article examines selected food safety offenses of New South Wales aimed at assessing their definitional clarity and penal rationality looking through the lens of an offender's culpability. It carries out a critical analysis based on archival materials and concludes that the present offense provisions hold significant merits to regulate food safety; however, further clarity of their inherent complexities could enhance their efficacy.


'Pitting Against The Core' And 'Split Unity', Madeleine T. Kelly Jan 2014

'Pitting Against The Core' And 'Split Unity', Madeleine T. Kelly

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This exhibition reveals previously unexplored intersections between science fiction (SF) and art. Science fiction and art have long been connected by a set of related interests such as technology and formal expressions. Science fiction in its most popular manifestations, such as literature and cinema, expresses cultural anxieties and desires through a set of concepts, tropes and themes shared with the visual arts.

Conquest of Space: Science Fiction & Contemporary Art features more than 40 artworks exploring important stories in the history of the science fiction genre.

This multi-faceted project is presented in partnership with ABC TV, the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the College of Fine Arts, UNSW; and is led by the exhibition curator, documentary host and COFA lecturer, Dr Andrew Frost.


Crossing Seas, Jo Law Jan 2014

Crossing Seas, Jo Law

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Law's works have been exhibited widely across Australia and internationally in Hong Kong, the United States, Mexico, Norway, the Philippines, and Taiwan. She has received awards including the Silver Spire Award at the San Francisco International Film Festival. In 2008 she was the Australia Council’s artist-inresidence in Tokyo in where she produced the online work, Autumn Almanac of Tokyo which later led to The Illustrated Almanac of the Illawarra and Beyond (funded by an Australia Council’s Visual Arts Board’s New Work grant) in 2011 and 2012


Dispute Settlement In The Law Of The Sea Convention And Territorial And Maritime Disputes In Southeast Asia: Issues, Opportunities, And Challenges, Lowell Bautista Jan 2014

Dispute Settlement In The Law Of The Sea Convention And Territorial And Maritime Disputes In Southeast Asia: Issues, Opportunities, And Challenges, Lowell Bautista

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC) provides for a dispute settlement regime that establishes a compulsory and binding framework for the peaceful settlement of all ocean-related disputes. In Southeast Asia, despite the long-standing myriad of territorial and maritime disputes, there appears to be a general reluctance to utilize the dispute settlement provisions of LOSC. The region has very little experience in international litigation involving territorial and maritime disputes, and a reluctance to utilize the dispute settlement provisions of LOSC.While the LOSC legal framework offers some options, the highly complicated nature of the disputes ...


Regional Governance For Fisheries And Biodiversity, Robin Warner, Kristina Gjerde, David Freestone Jan 2014

Regional Governance For Fisheries And Biodiversity, Robin Warner, Kristina Gjerde, David Freestone

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Strong and coherent regional governance is critical for tackling the increasing number and variety of threats to fisheries and biodiversity within and beyond national jurisdiction including overfishing, destructive fishing practices, marine pollution and climate change impacts. This chapter examines the existing legal and institutional framework for fisheries and biodiversity governance at the regional level including key regional organizations such as regional fisheries management organizations, regional seas organizations and non-binding regional initiatives. As well as highlighting the fragmentary nature of regional oceans governance, this analysis discloses the wide variety of approaches to and differing rates of progress in harmonizing fisheries and ...


Drawing Malaysia's Line Over The Straits, Mohd Hazmi Bin Mohd Rusli, Lowell Bautista Jan 2014

Drawing Malaysia's Line Over The Straits, Mohd Hazmi Bin Mohd Rusli, Lowell Bautista

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The South China Sea has been an area of focus, particularly in the issues of conflicting maritime claims among countries in the region. Less focus, however, is given to the conflicting maritime claims that are still ongoing between Malaysia and its neighbours in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore.


Artifactualities: Biopolitics And Settler Colonial Liberalism, Michael R. Griffiths Jan 2014

Artifactualities: Biopolitics And Settler Colonial Liberalism, Michael R. Griffiths

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

How does one conceive the settler colony within the framework of a globalizing, transnational geopolitical order? An initial question that could function as a precondition to locating settler colonial space within the global late liberal order might proceed in the following phrasing: how are we to conceive nation-states made up predominantly of Europen-descended settlers?


Four Scholars Speak To Navigating The Complexities Of Naming In Indigenous Studies, Bronwyn Carlson, J Berglund, Michelle Harris, Evan S. Te Ahu Poata-Smith Jan 2014

Four Scholars Speak To Navigating The Complexities Of Naming In Indigenous Studies, Bronwyn Carlson, J Berglund, Michelle Harris, Evan S. Te Ahu Poata-Smith

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Universities in Australia are expanding their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies programs to include Indigenous populations from around the globe. This is also the case for the Indigenous Studies Unit at the University of Wollongong (UOW). Although systems of nomenclature in Indigenous Studies seek to be respectful of difference, the politics of naming in the global context raises some complexities worthy of discussion. In this article, four scholars discuss the politics of naming in relation to teaching a joint Indigenous Studies subject at the UOW and Northern Arizona University.


A Secular Australia? Ideas, Politics And The Search For Moral Order In Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Century Australia, Gregory Melleuish Jan 2014

A Secular Australia? Ideas, Politics And The Search For Moral Order In Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Century Australia, Gregory Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article argues that the relationship between the religious and the secular in Australia is complex and that there has been no simple transition from a religious society to a secular one. It argues that the emergence of apparently secular moral orders in the second half of the nineteenth century involved what Steven D. Smith has termed the 'smuggling in' of ideas and beliefs which are religious in nature. This can be seen clearly in the economic debates of the second half of the nineteenth century in Australia in which a Free Trade based on an optimistic natural theology battled ...


Southeast Asia's Maritime Piracy: Challenges, Legal Instruments And A Way Forward, Ahmad Amri Jan 2014

Southeast Asia's Maritime Piracy: Challenges, Legal Instruments And A Way Forward, Ahmad Amri

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Piracy is considered a critical maritime security threat in Southeast Asia. Whilst piracy has always been a perennial problem in the region, this threat has received increasing attention over the past few years. Reports published by the International Maritime Organization as well as the International Maritime Bureau show an alarming increase in acts of piracy on Southeast Asian waters over the past decade. In ancient times, the main drivers of piracy were raiding for plunder and capture of slaves; however, in modern times, developments in politics, economics and even military technology have drastically altered the universal crime of piracy. There ...


Taxation In Australia Up Until 1914: The Warp And Weft Of Protectionism, Caroline Dick Jan 2014

Taxation In Australia Up Until 1914: The Warp And Weft Of Protectionism, Caroline Dick

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article offers an account of the taxing policies in Australia from 1788 up until the beginning of World War I, when the exigencies of the First World War forced the Australian government to reassess its tax policies. During the period from 1788 until 1914, Australia transitioned from being a collection of provincial colonies with their own economic objectives and taxing policies to a Federation with a centrally-directed taxing authority. Whilst this political transition was taking place there was also a transition occurring in government policy concerning the function of taxation in Australia.

Government no longer used taxation just for ...


Lawyers Look At The Elgin Marbles, But Stars Keep Them Firmly In Sight, Marett Leiboff Jan 2014

Lawyers Look At The Elgin Marbles, But Stars Keep Them Firmly In Sight, Marett Leiboff

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Legal star power is being deployed in the form of the very well-known London barristers, Geoffrey Robertson QC and Amal Alamuddin, in Greece’s latest attempt to have the Elgin or Parthenon Marbles returned to Greece.

Housed in the British Museum in London since 1816, these sculptures have been the subject of contentious legal to-ings and fro-ings since the early 1980s.

Under English law, the Museum owns the Marbles, and says it cannot lawfully return them to Greece. Greece contends they were removed unlawfully all those years ago and should be returned.

The dispute over the Marbles is one of ...


Thực Thi Công Ước Quyền Trẻ Em Ở Việt Nam:Tuổi Chịu Trách Nhiệm Hình Sự Và Chế Tài Đối Với Người Chưa Thành Niên Phạm Tội, Thi Thanh Nga Pham Jan 2014

Thực Thi Công Ước Quyền Trẻ Em Ở Việt Nam:Tuổi Chịu Trách Nhiệm Hình Sự Và Chế Tài Đối Với Người Chưa Thành Niên Phạm Tội, Thi Thanh Nga Pham

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Giới thiệu chung

Tuổi chịu trách nhiệm hình sự (TNHS) và chế tài hình sự hay hình phạt là những vấn đề cơ bản và không thể thiếu trong cả hệ thống pháp luật quốc gia và quốc tế, thể hiện quan điểm và cách thức xử lý người phạm tội, cũng như các biện pháp bảo vệ trật tự xã hội, an toàn công cộng và quyền con người. Việc xác định những giới hạn độ tuổi chịu TNHS thích hợp, đặc biệt là tuổi tối thiểu luôn là vấn đề khó khăn khi xây dựng chính sách hình ...


Developments In The Right To Defence For Juvenile Offenders Since Vietnam’S Ratification Of The Convention On The Rights Of The Child, Thi Thanh Nga Pham Jan 2014

Developments In The Right To Defence For Juvenile Offenders Since Vietnam’S Ratification Of The Convention On The Rights Of The Child, Thi Thanh Nga Pham

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article examines Vietnam’s legal changes and law enforcement practices in regards to the right to defence of juvenile offenders since Vietnam ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1990. A combination of research methods is employed, including document analysis, statistical analysis, and selected case studies. The findings of the research indicate that Vietnam has demonstrated considerable improvement in acknowledging the right to defence of juvenile offenders in its law. The contemporary Vietnamese regulations are similar to the CRC’s requirements about legal assistance for juvenile offenders. The implementation of the law, however, confronts ...


Walking, Writing And Dreaming: Rebecca Solnit’S Polyphonic Voices, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2014

Walking, Writing And Dreaming: Rebecca Solnit’S Polyphonic Voices, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

American writer Rebecca Solnit has published 17 books since 1990, ranging from biography to cultural histories and art criticism to personal essays. Because her work is not easily classified and because she sits at the intersection of a number of different fields, her work provides a particularly interesting case study of hybrid practices in contemporary non-fiction. This article argues that her work is a form of literary journalism: polyphonic open journalism. Solnit’s work demonstrates traces and practices arising from her training as a journalist that she has combined them with writerly and activist practices that produce a distinctive open ...


History Foundation To Year 12 (In Review Of The Australian Curriculum - Supplementary Material), Gregory Melleuish Jan 2014

History Foundation To Year 12 (In Review Of The Australian Curriculum - Supplementary Material), Gregory Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Australian history curriculum is compulsory for Years Foundation through to Year 10. It states that its rationale is as follows: ‘The curriculum generally takes a world history approach within which the history of Australia is taught.’ The curriculum is also defined, and limited, by its three cross-curriculum priorities:

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

* Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia

* Sustainability.


The Future Of History, Rowan Cahill Jan 2014

The Future Of History, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

war in Iraq (2003) in the bloody search-and-destroy mission against non-existent Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) recently confessed to being a little embarrassed.

On the September 2014 eve of the release of The Menzies Era, his book of hero worship about conservative Australian PM Sir Robert Menzies, Howard told an interviewer that, when it became public knowledge, the US intelligence reports he based his decision on regarding WMD were faulty, well, he was embarrassed. Not ashamed, mind you, not distraught … which might be expected, since he has a huge amount of civilian blood on his hands … no, just embarrassed.


Speaking Too Soon: The Sabotage Of Bail Reform In New South Wales, D. Brown, Julia Quilter Jan 2014

Speaking Too Soon: The Sabotage Of Bail Reform In New South Wales, D. Brown, Julia Quilter

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Within just over one month of coming into operation in May 2014, the new Bail Act 2013 (NSW), a product of long-term law reform consideration, was reviewed and then amended after talk-back radio ‘shock jock’ and tabloid newspaper outcry over three cases. This article examines the media triggers, the main arguments of the review conducted by former New South Wales (NSW) Attorney General John Hatzistergos, and the amendments, with our analysis of the judicial interpretation of the Act thus far providing relevant background. We argue that the amendments are premature, unnecessary, create complexity and confusion, and, quite possibly, will have ...


One-Punch Laws, Mandatory Minimums And 'Alcohol-Fuelled' As An Aggravating Factor: Implications For Nsw Criminal Law, Julia Quilter Jan 2014

One-Punch Laws, Mandatory Minimums And 'Alcohol-Fuelled' As An Aggravating Factor: Implications For Nsw Criminal Law, Julia Quilter

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article critically examines the New South Wales State Government's latest policy response to the problem of alcohol-related violence and anxiety about 'one punch' killings: the recently enacted Crimes and Other Legislation Amendment (Assault and Intoxication) Act 2014 (NSW). Based on an analysis of both the circumstances out of which it emerged, and the terms in which the new offences of assault causing death and assault causing death while intoxicated have been defined, I argue that the Act represents another example of criminal law 'reform' that is devoid of principle, produces a lack of coherence in the criminal law ...


Pam Johnston Dahl Helm: Lost To Our Mothers, Diana Wood Conroy Jan 2014

Pam Johnston Dahl Helm: Lost To Our Mothers, Diana Wood Conroy

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In the time I knew Pam Johnstoni during her doctoral study at the University of Wollongong (1995-1998) the search for mothers, the need for certain and indissoluble affections underpinned her art and writing. The father was lost and absent: there was a constant matrilineal momentum in her positioning of herself. “To explore mother daughter relationships, to examine oral histories as a way back to Aboriginal connections to land”, she wrote, was pivotal to her work (Johnston 1997, p.5). As a tribute to her, and because of my admiration for her courage and passion for justice I would like to ...


Spying On Dissent: It's The Australian Way, Rowan Cahill Jan 2014

Spying On Dissent: It's The Australian Way, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The clandestine involvement of military folk in the political and industrial affairs of the nation has a long history. Dissenting organisations should adopt counter-intelligence measures 'Oppositional, dissident organisations owe it to themselves and their supporters to adopt counter-intelligence procedures.' Photograph: Guardian Australia Allegations this week that the anti-mining camp at Maules creek in NSW was infiltrated by corporate spies should come as no surprise. While one activist told the Guardian Australia she felt "a sickening feeling of betrayal", in reality this is the Australian way. The clandestine involvement of military folk in the political and industrial affairs of the nation ...


Towards A New Understanding Of Identity: Discourses Of Belonging In Goethe's Italienische Reise And Heine's Italian Reisebilder, Lukas Bauer Jan 2014

Towards A New Understanding Of Identity: Discourses Of Belonging In Goethe's Italienische Reise And Heine's Italian Reisebilder, Lukas Bauer

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's (1749-1832) account of his travels in Italy, Italienische Reise (1816, 1817, 1829), transformed the image of the South in the German literary imagination of the early nineteenth century. Goethe represented Italy's Arcadian landscape and classical heritage as the source of the German cultural tradition and as essential to Germans' understanding of their own history. Because of its association with Goethe, the journey to Italy was used as a vehicle by a later generation of writers to position themselves in relation to him and also to distance themselves from his influence and challenge his authority ...


To Restore Federalism, Strengthen The States And Make Australia More Republican, Gregory Melleuish Jan 2014

To Restore Federalism, Strengthen The States And Make Australia More Republican, Gregory Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The reform of Australia’s federation is under review. In this special series, we ask leading Australian academics to begin a debate on renewing federalism, from tax reform to the broader issues of democracy.

The University of Wollongong’s Gregory Melleuish explains how the current state-federal relationship has warped from the ideals of Australia’s constitution and why a return to republican principles must be the remedy.>p>


Women And Leadership: Theatre, Sarah Miller Jan 2014

Women And Leadership: Theatre, Sarah Miller

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

"We have something of the utmost importance to contribute: the sensibility, the experience and the expertise of one half of humanity. All we ask is that we are able to do this in conditions of complete equality." (Dorothy Hewitt, launching the Australia Council's 'Women in the Arts' report, 1983) Published in 2005, Rachel Fensham and Denise Varney's important book, The Doll's Revolution: Australian Theatre and Cultural Imagination, argues that the 1990s was a period in which women entered the theatrical mainstream and radically changed not just theatre but the way in which we think about Australian culture ...