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Notes On Contributors, Anne Rutherford Apr 2019

Notes On Contributors, Anne Rutherford

Kunapipi

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS


Moving Worlds, Nima Poovaya-Smith Apr 2019

Moving Worlds, Nima Poovaya-Smith

Kunapipi

Born in China, brought up and educated in Singapore as well as England and widely travelled, Shirley Chew lives the concept of moving between worlds with great understatement and a certain stylish panache.


'Reflections On The Thames, Westminster', John Mcleod Apr 2019

'Reflections On The Thames, Westminster', John Mcleod

Kunapipi

Beside my desk is a framed print of John Atkinson Grimshaw's painting Reflections on the Thames, Westminster (1880). I bought it three years ago at the Leeds City Art Gallery, where the painting is on display, and hung it underneath the skylight so that it might catch as much light as possible. Like his painting Whitby Harbour by Moonlight (1867) it is a night-time scene, with a dark landscape faintly illuminated by pin-pricks of light. From the vantage of the Embankment we look out over the Thames, with the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Bridge in the distance. The ...


On Not Having The Last Word: Back To Henry Green, Alistair Stead Apr 2019

On Not Having The Last Word: Back To Henry Green, Alistair Stead

Kunapipi

Henry Green did not finish his second novel, Mood, nor, for very different reasons, did he finish the memoirs of his fire-fighting experience in London during the Blitz. On the collapse of his last project, an attempt to return to and complete his 'interim' autobiography. Pack My Bag (1940), he produced for The Spectator in 1963 what in effect were his last words as a writer ([1992 284-85). 'For Jenny with Affection from Henry Green' was a kind of apology for being unable to write novels any more and, more obliquely (since it was to Jenny Rees that he had ...


The Ignoble Politics Of Naipaul's Nobel, Githa Hariharan Apr 2019

The Ignoble Politics Of Naipaul's Nobel, Githa Hariharan

Kunapipi

On receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2001, V.S. Naipaul responded by paying tribute to England, '(his) home', and India, 'the home of (his) ancestors' {The Guardian 2001). Oddly enough, Trinidad does not merit a mention in Naipaul's tribute — though he was born and grew up in Trinidad, and though it is the home of his most admired early work such as The Mystic Masseur (1957), Miguel Street (1959) and A House for Mr Biswas (1961). Or perhaps it is not so odd, considering Naipaul has written, 'I knew Trinidad to be unimportant, uncreative, cynical', with 'an ...


Face-Work And Going To The End Of The Line With Frank Davey's Writing, Lynette Hunter Apr 2019

Face-Work And Going To The End Of The Line With Frank Davey's Writing, Lynette Hunter

Kunapipi

For me, make-up is vital. Every day I spend hours preparing, touching up, repairing you can do such different things with sunset blue over moss green with sweet surprise over scarlet hurricane, it's my armour/amour/armament but no mere ornament It's not just SLAP, but the semiotics of the face the science of signs the art of signs, significations, that old distinction between significance and meaning that we rarely talk about today, it's so much part of our social training


Sir Orfeo And Middle English Romance As Creative Re-Reading, Catherine Batt Apr 2019

Sir Orfeo And Middle English Romance As Creative Re-Reading, Catherine Batt

Kunapipi

Amitav Ghosh, medievalist and post-colonial novelist, in his Arthur Ravenscroft Memorial Lecture (Leeds, 1997), recounts his experience as a writer in autobiographical and literary terms. Beginning with the memory of his grandfather's bookcase and its contents, Ghosh considers the nature of the space the novel-writer occupies with respect to a form at once 'vigorously international' and locally specific (7), and concludes that a process of alienation must take place if one is to write about one's own experience: 'to locate oneself (through prose) one must begin with an act of dislocation' (13). Ghosh's reflection on 'dislocation' offers ...


Looking Through Glass: Reflections On Photography And Mukul Kesavan, Mick Gidley Apr 2019

Looking Through Glass: Reflections On Photography And Mukul Kesavan, Mick Gidley

Kunapipi

The plot of Mukul Kesavan's novel, Looking Through Glass (1995), almost presents itself as spectacle. Observation of its central mechanism grants us the kind of elation warranted by the sight of an elephant levitating. The unnamed narrator and photographer protagonist, speaking from the present of the end of the twentieth century, describes his current double mission: to scatter his grandmother's ashes ceremoniously in the waters of the Ganges and to take commissioned photographs of certain architectural features of the ancient buildings of Lucknow, an assignment that would require the use of his brand new, very powerful telephoto lens ...


Tim Winton's 'New Tribalism': Cloudstreet And Community, Stuart Murray Apr 2019

Tim Winton's 'New Tribalism': Cloudstreet And Community, Stuart Murray

Kunapipi

In Gallipoli, Peter Weir's 1981 examination of nationalist sentiment and myth, the central protagonists, Archie Hamilton (Mark Lee) and Frank Dunne (Mel Gibson), are both members of the Western Australian Light Horse, a cavalry regiment and part of the 1st Australian Imperial Force that takes part in the conflict at Gallipoli in April 1915. Archie's death at the end of the narrative — charging into the Turkish guns — and Frank's ultimate survival conclude the film's often self-indulgent meditation on the nature of the national imaginary. In seeing Archie's death as tragedy, and Frank's survival in ...


Terrorism And The Informative Romance: Two Early South-Asian Novels In English, Alex Tickell Apr 2019

Terrorism And The Informative Romance: Two Early South-Asian Novels In English, Alex Tickell

Kunapipi

On a warm evening early in July 1909, a young Indian man dressed informally in a plain suit and a carefully wound light blue turban left his lodgings in Ledbury Road, Bayswater, for the last time. Madan Lai Dhingra, a student at London's University College, had already been out earlier in the evening at a shooting range on the Tottenham Court Road, where he had practised firing his Colt revolver at a paper target, and had asked for the gun to be cleaned before he left. As he walked quickly towards South Kensington, Dhingra carried the Colt, another automatic ...


The Unbearable Lightness Of Being: Repetition, Formal Stancture, And Critique, John Barnard Apr 2019

The Unbearable Lightness Of Being: Repetition, Formal Stancture, And Critique, John Barnard

Kunapipi

The power of Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1985)springs from a constant exchange between his sceptical critical intelligence and his belief in the autonomy of his fictional characters. The novel persistently draws attention to its fictiveness. It is divided into seven named parts. Part One, 'Lightness and Weight', opens with an ironic self-contained section on Nietzsche's 'idea of the eternal return' (the first of many interpolated 'essays' on 'philosophical' topics). There is an avoidance throughout of interior monologue. The narrator insistently reminds us in propria persona that what we are reading is a fiction: 'I ...


Off-White: Creolite And Hidden 'Difference' Under Apartheid, Elleke Boehmer Apr 2019

Off-White: Creolite And Hidden 'Difference' Under Apartheid, Elleke Boehmer

Kunapipi

SLIDE ONE The way she bent back the small girl's thumb, as if smoothing a wayward dogear in a favourite book. They sat in the white tiled foyer of the Community Museum, the Gemeentemuseum, the early winter dark settling into its comers and alcoves. The darker it grew, and the quieter, the more vigorously the girl swung her legs, her polished, Europe-bought Mary Janes. She swung deeper and higher, higher and deeper, feeling the edge of the oak bench on which they were both sitting digging into her skin. She hoped her energetic activity might distract the attention of ...


Second Reading, Romesh Gunesekera Apr 2019

Second Reading, Romesh Gunesekera

Kunapipi

Poem


'So Where Is Cythera?' Walcott's Painted Islands, David Richards Apr 2019

'So Where Is Cythera?' Walcott's Painted Islands, David Richards

Kunapipi

When Sonali, the Western-educated senior civil servant of Nayantara Sahgal's novel of the Indian Emergency, Rich Like Us, first sees a reproduction of Antoine Watteau's Pèlerinage à l'île de Cythère, she regards the aristocrats depicted in the painting, 'dressed up and romping around pretending to be peasants, living in a little dream world' (204) as fit only for the guillotine, to which history and the French Revolution will inexorably and justifiably condemn them. For her, Watteau's image is an icon of the European ancien régime, perfectly expressing its mood of arrogant complacency with 'powdered hair and ...


From The Diary Of An English Teacher, Meenakshi Mukherjee Apr 2019

From The Diary Of An English Teacher, Meenakshi Mukherjee

Kunapipi

More than ten years ago, Shirley Chew and Anna Rutherford invited me to contribute to their volume Unbecoming Daughters of the ^m/^/re (1993).Writing that piece about my childhood turned out to be more fun than anything else I had done earlier and while reading the other accounts in the book I became keenly aware how each of our lives are part of a larger cultural narrative. For the special issue dedicated to Shirley, I wanted to write something in the same mood — rather than another solemn academic paper. I share a warm bond of friendship with Shirley, and ...


Women Writing Fiction In India's Languages Over Fifty Years Of Independence, Ranjana Sidhantaash Apr 2019

Women Writing Fiction In India's Languages Over Fifty Years Of Independence, Ranjana Sidhantaash

Kunapipi

English was decreed to be the official language of India from 1835, when the country was under British rule from 1835, — the same year Lord Macaulay's Resolution declared official funds would be 'henceforth employed in imparting to the Native population knowledge of English literature and science through the medium of the English language' (Spear 126-27). While English helped in the advancement of Indian higher education and the intellectual modernisation of a new middle and upper class — the Indian intelligentsia — it marginalised the regional languages of India which, in the earlier part of the nineteenth century, were beginning to break ...


She Travelled, Elizabeth Cook Apr 2019

She Travelled, Elizabeth Cook

Kunapipi

Poem


A Caribbean Georgic: James Grainger's The Sugar-Cane, David Fairer Apr 2019

A Caribbean Georgic: James Grainger's The Sugar-Cane, David Fairer

Kunapipi

As a genre, the eighteenth-century georgic poem seems to embody a compromise between the creative and the critical. Not only is it a conscious imitation of a specific literary text (Virgil's Georgics), but it grounds itself in the critical impulse: it offers judgments, gives advice, discriminates between right and wrong methods, and investigates questions of use and value. It has a duty to be both descriptive and didactic. In combining exact observation with specific recommendation, the georgic is conscious of the critical nature of its text. When John Dyer, in The Fleece (1757), offers advice on how to spot ...


'Open To Encounters': Some Thoughts On Translation As Criticism And Creation, Inga-Stina Ewbank Apr 2019

'Open To Encounters': Some Thoughts On Translation As Criticism And Creation, Inga-Stina Ewbank

Kunapipi

In the family of literary activities, translation used to be seen as a stepchild,

doomed to be looked down on as being derivative rather than original. From a

consciousness of belonging 'below' — in the words of Donald Frame, himself a

distinguished translator of Montaigne's complete works — translators have

written of the lack of recognition of the nature and demands of their work, and

of the thanklessness of doing hard work for which the best praise is 'transparent'

— not the ideal colour for the spur of fame.


Curriculum Curricula, D. J Enright Apr 2019

Curriculum Curricula, D. J Enright

Kunapipi

— running, skipping, barefoot on the covered pavement of the shophouse where

they Hved; her mother not best pleased: unholy infant! No one reports

seeing her walk like a tender young willow shoot in a spriilg breeze exactly.

What was the point of pointy feet? You couldn't even play hopscotch

with them. Three-inch lotus petals my foot!


Introduction, Catherine Batt, Elleke Boehmer, John Mcleod Apr 2019

Introduction, Catherine Batt, Elleke Boehmer, John Mcleod

Kunapipi

This special issue of Kunapipi is a tribute to tlie work and career of Professor

Shirley Chew, who retires in June 2003 as Professor of Commonwealth and

Postcolonial Literatures in the School of English, University of Leeds, UK. She

has occupied the Chair at Leeds since 1993, but her association with the School

of English dates from 1974. Along with other scholars at Leeds, such as Arthur

Ravenscroft, William Walsh, Lynette Hunter and David Richards — and in

association with international figures such as the late Anna Rutherford — Shirley

has dedicated her academic career to the teaching, researching and promoting

of ...


Kunapipi 25 (1) 2003, Contents, Editorial, Anne Collett Apr 2019

Kunapipi 25 (1) 2003, Contents, Editorial, Anne Collett

Kunapipi

Kunapipi 25 (1) 2003, Contents, Editorial


Notes On Contributors, Index Mar 2019

Notes On Contributors, Index

Kunapipi

Notes on Contributors, Index


Letter From The President Of Eaclals (August 2003), Geoffrey V. Davis, Marc Delrez, Benedicte Ledent Mar 2019

Letter From The President Of Eaclals (August 2003), Geoffrey V. Davis, Marc Delrez, Benedicte Ledent

Kunapipi

The new executive committee took over after the Copenhagen Triennial conference in Spring, 2002. It consists of Geoffrey V. Davis, University of Aachen (Chair); Marc Delrez, University of Liège (Secretary); and Bénédicte Ledent, University of Liège (Treasurer).


Malaysian Literature In English: An Evolving Tradition, Mohammad A. Quayum Mar 2019

Malaysian Literature In English: An Evolving Tradition, Mohammad A. Quayum

Kunapipi

Introduction In spite of the many early challenges and lingering difficulties faced by writers in the English language in Malaysia — challenges and difficulties of a political, literary and social nature — literary tradition in English in this newly emergent nation has come a long way, showing considerable dynamism and resilience since its inception. Critics suggest that the literarture in English in post-colonial societies generally evolves in three stages. In The Empire Writes Back: Theoiy and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures, Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths and Helen Tiffin, for example, explain these three stages as: (i) ‘[works] produced by “representatives” of the imperial ...


Sarung Slippages And Hybrid Manoeuvres, Jacqueline Lo Mar 2019

Sarung Slippages And Hybrid Manoeuvres, Jacqueline Lo

Kunapipi

In recent times the term hybridity has become almost a cliché: it is used as both a descriptor and a category' of analysis of certain kinds of cultural formations and identities. When hybridity is used as a descriptor it usually connotes a fusion of unlike elements. For example, world music is defined as a hybrid form consisting of a mixture of musical influences from various cultures (a bit of didgeridoo mixed with Pan pipes Tibetan chants African drumming etc.): likewise, the new Australian ‘fusion cuisine' is based on a so-called East-meets- West culinary union.


In Conservation With David Milroy: Australian National Playwrights’ Conference, Australian National University, Canberra [April 28 2002], Ernie Blackmore Mar 2019

In Conservation With David Milroy: Australian National Playwrights’ Conference, Australian National University, Canberra [April 28 2002], Ernie Blackmore

Kunapipi

In ways that had not occurred to me previously, I have discovered that having one’s own will can be terrifying at times and yet at others can be totally liberating. Although not happening as quickly as they might have liked, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander performance arts practitioners of disciplines that range from light and sound through to design, directing and acting, are becoming involved in a movement within Indigenous performing arts communities that supports young Aboriginal people in the exercise of their own will. Indigenous artists are developing a ‘voice’ of their own.


Colonialism, Nationalism, Modernism: Rethinking Furphy’S Such Is Life, Stephen Cowden Mar 2019

Colonialism, Nationalism, Modernism: Rethinking Furphy’S Such Is Life, Stephen Cowden

Kunapipi

‘Offensively Australian’ Joseph Furphy completed the first draft of his magnum opus Such Is Life in 1897, and, being unsure where to have it published, submitted the 1,125 pages of hand-written manuscript to the Bulletin magazine, of which he was an inveterate admirer. In a now famous covering letter he wrote to the magazine’s editor J.F. Archibald : ‘I have just finished writing a full sized novel: title ‘Such Is Life’; scene Riverina and northern Vic; temper democratic; bias, offensively Australian’ (Barnes and Hoffman 28). These latter phrases have come to be seen as expressive of the ‘legendary ...


Border Crossing: An Introduction And Poems, Gerry Turcotte Mar 2019

Border Crossing: An Introduction And Poems, Gerry Turcotte

Kunapipi

Border Crossings began as an idea for a photographic installation which premiered in 2002 at the Wollongong City Gallery, in Wollongong, Australia. A merging of print and filmic texts, the show worked as a meditation on migration, through images and poems that travelled between Canada and Australia, though it also moved through other landscapes, from Switzerland to Turkey. The show attempted to challenge the way photographs were typically presented as well. Many of the Canadian works of dilapidated buildings, for example, were framed using recycled Australian materials: paling fences, decomposing sleepers, and rusted metals. Australian images were surrounded by Canadian ...


Blue-Eyed And Brown-Skinned: Uncovering A Hidden Past, R. B Ss Mar 2019

Blue-Eyed And Brown-Skinned: Uncovering A Hidden Past, R. B Ss

Kunapipi

My name is R—. I was bom in England in 1964. and this is my story. As part of my immediate family would be most unhappy if they knew Ed written it, I will withhold names to respect their privacy.