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Iowa State University

Air Management Practices Assessment Tool

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Animal Housing—Barriers Overview, Jay D. Harmon, Steven J. Hoff, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz Apr 2014

Animal Housing—Barriers Overview, Jay D. Harmon, Steven J. Hoff, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz

Agriculture and Environment Extension Publications

Barriers can be used to address dust and odor coming from animal housing. Barriers, or “windbreak walls” are used downwind of fans to reduce forward momentum of airflow, settle out dust particles, and push the exiting plume higher into the atmosphere.


Animal Housing—Chimney Overview, Jay D. Harmon, Steven J. Hoff, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz Mar 2014

Animal Housing—Chimney Overview, Jay D. Harmon, Steven J. Hoff, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz

Agriculture and Environment Extension Publications

The use of chimneys in animal housing systems can elevate odors and increase dispersion with increased wind speed and air turbulence at higher elevations.

This fact sheet is part of the Air Management Practices Assessment Tool (AMPAT) developed at Iowa State University and funded by the National Pork Board. Additional resources can be found on the AMPAT web page at: www.agronext.iastate.edu/ampat


Animal Housing—Biofilters Overview, Jay D. Harmon, Steven J. Hoff, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz Mar 2014

Animal Housing—Biofilters Overview, Jay D. Harmon, Steven J. Hoff, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz

Agriculture and Environment Extension Publications

Biofilters are used on mechanically ventilated livestock buildings to treat the ventilation air. A bed of biological material, normally wood chips, is created and the ventilation air flows through the material. Gases are absorbed by cultures of microbes that develop in the bed.

This fact sheet is part of the Air Management Practices Assessment Tool (AMPAT) developed at Iowa State University and funded by the National Pork Board. Additional resources can be found on the AMPAT web page at: www.agronext.iastate.edu/ampat


Animal Housing—Electrostatic Precipitation Overview, Jay D. Harmon, Steven J. Hoff, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz Mar 2014

Animal Housing—Electrostatic Precipitation Overview, Jay D. Harmon, Steven J. Hoff, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz

Agriculture and Environment Extension Publications

Electrostatic precipitation can be used to reduce emissions, odor and dust from animal housing. Electrostatic systems work by imparting a negative charge on dust particles, causing them to stick to grounded surfaces such as gates, floors and walls.

This fact sheet is part of the Air Management Practices Assessment Tool (AMPAT) developed at Iowa State University and funded by the National Pork Board. Additional resources can be found on the AMPAT web page at: www.agronext.iastate.edu/ampat