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Iowa State University

Plant Sciences

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Camelina

Publication Year

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Winter Cereal Rye And Selected Brassica Cover Crops For Forage Prior To Soybeans, Timothy James Sklenar Jan 2018

Winter Cereal Rye And Selected Brassica Cover Crops For Forage Prior To Soybeans, Timothy James Sklenar

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Despite myriad benefits to incorporating winter cover crops into conventionally managed row crop systems farmer adoption remains low in Iowa. Commonly cited apprehensions include the costs associated with managing cover crops without any short term economic benefits and the complexities associated with management of cover crops. The management of cover crops as a forage could potentially help address both of these issues while at the same time enhancing the environmental sustainability of conventionally managed systems. The work provided in this thesis is an attempt to evaluate the potential for four selected species to be managed as dual-purpose winter cover crops ...


An Integrative Approach For Germplasm Utilization, Genetic Diversity And Qtl Mapping In Camelina Spp. And Crop-Production Issues In Thlaspi Arvense, New Promising Oilseed Crops For Bioenergy And Industrial Uses, Ivan Mauricio Ayala Diaz Jan 2014

An Integrative Approach For Germplasm Utilization, Genetic Diversity And Qtl Mapping In Camelina Spp. And Crop-Production Issues In Thlaspi Arvense, New Promising Oilseed Crops For Bioenergy And Industrial Uses, Ivan Mauricio Ayala Diaz

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Fuel demands continue to increase to satisfy current energy needs. Fossil fuels are the primary source of energy and supply 80% of the total demand, 58% of which is used for transportation purposes. However, decreasing oil reserves, rising prices and negative environmental implications have all contributed to growing demand for alternative energy sources, such as bioenergy crops. Ideally a good bioenergy crop has low input requirements (able to grow in marginal zones), fast growth and maturity, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress conditions, and high productivity. Camelina (Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz) and pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) have been targeted as ...