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Iowa State University

Life Sciences

Animal Science

1999

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

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Winter Grazing Management, Stephen K. Barnhart, James R. Russell, Douglas L. Karlen, Michael J. Tidman Nov 1999

Winter Grazing Management, Stephen K. Barnhart, James R. Russell, Douglas L. Karlen, Michael J. Tidman

Integrated Crop Management News

Why winter grazing? Beef cow herd and sheep flock records show that winter feeding costs are livestock producers' single largest production expense. Managing through winter weather while keeping feeding costs low is an essential part of maintaining a profitable operation. Iowa's climate generally allows forage growth only during a 7-to-8 month period. Extending the grazing of this forage--even an extra 3 or 4 weeks in late autumn and winter--is an economical way to maintain or increase livestock profitability. Some producers extend the grazing season by using stockpiled forage, whereas others use crop residue, and many combine the use of ...


Evaluation Of The Nitrogen And Energy Utilization Of Legume Forages By Growing Cattle And Sheep, James R. Russell, Mohammadreza Ghaffarzadeh Jan 1999

Evaluation Of The Nitrogen And Energy Utilization Of Legume Forages By Growing Cattle And Sheep, James R. Russell, Mohammadreza Ghaffarzadeh

Leopold Center Completed Grant Reports

Forages can help maintain or enhance environmental quality by preventing soil erosion and increasing soil nitrogen so that less nitrogen fertilizer is needed. However, because the protein in most legume forages is highly degraded in the rumen of cattle or sheep, utilization of forage protein may be inefficient. This research project looked at the possibilities for using berseem clover and kura clover to increase feed efficiency of growing animals and lactating dairy cows.


Botanicals As Part Of An Integral Value-Added Pork Production System, Eric Franzenburg, Palmer J. Holden, James D. Mckean, Gary D. Osweiler Jan 1999

Botanicals As Part Of An Integral Value-Added Pork Production System, Eric Franzenburg, Palmer J. Holden, James D. Mckean, Gary D. Osweiler

Leopold Center Completed Grant Reports

Selected herbs are known to naturally possess antibacterial and other characteristics that could be useful in animal protein production. Inclusion of these herbs in animal feeds as alternative growth promotion and efficiency stimulants may be able to address some of the current concerns about the possibility of significant antibiotic-resistant bacteria development that stems from drugs currently used at subtherapeutic levels in animal production. Several herbs were tested for their ability to aid animal growth rates and feed efficiency without giving rise to antibiotic-resistant microbes.