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Iowa State University

Life Sciences

Animal Science

Integrated Crop Management News

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Flooding And Stored Grain, Charles R. Hurburgh, Daniel D. Loy Jun 2008

Flooding And Stored Grain, Charles R. Hurburgh, Daniel D. Loy

Integrated Crop Management News

Floodwaters have soaked many grain bins on farms and at commercial elevators. With only a few exceptions, flood soaked grain is not useable for feed or food. Flooding affects both the stored grain and the storage structures.


Beware! Nitrate Potential In Drought-Stricken Corn Crop, Daryl R. Strohbehn, Byron Leu Aug 2005

Beware! Nitrate Potential In Drought-Stricken Corn Crop, Daryl R. Strohbehn, Byron Leu

Integrated Crop Management News

During drought years the potential exists for the corn plant to have high levels of nitrates. This is largely due to high soil nitrogen levels that are readily available, but the plant is unable to utilize it because of moisture shortages. As a result the nitrates accumulate in the plant and can occur at toxic levels. Excessive levels in corn when harvested as green chop or made into corn silage and then fed can causehigh blood levels of methemoglobin to occur.


Winter Grazing And Pasture Erosion, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, H. Mark Hanna, Stephen K. Barnhart, James R. Russell Nov 2001

Winter Grazing And Pasture Erosion, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, H. Mark Hanna, Stephen K. Barnhart, James R. Russell

Integrated Crop Management News

Winter precipitation, whether it's rain, sleet, or snow, can lead to pasture erosion. Grazing livestock on frozen soil usually causes minimal pasture damage, but grazing pasture when soil is wet or muddy can lead to soil compaction, erosion, and long-term damage to pasture sod. Producers who manage livestock on pasture should consider the potential of soil erosion from winter grazing, particularly on sloped areas.


Phosphorus And Swine Feeding, Palmer J. Holden, Michael J. Tidman Apr 2001

Phosphorus And Swine Feeding, Palmer J. Holden, Michael J. Tidman

Integrated Crop Management News

This article focuses on developing a phosphorus (P) strategy for swine feeding operations and continues a series that provides producers with information on P management and environmental issues relating to P management.


Winter Grazing Management, Stephen K. Barnhart, James R. Russell, Douglas L. Karlen, Michael J. Tidman Nov 1999

Winter Grazing Management, Stephen K. Barnhart, James R. Russell, Douglas L. Karlen, Michael J. Tidman

Integrated Crop Management News

Why winter grazing? Beef cow herd and sheep flock records show that winter feeding costs are livestock producers' single largest production expense. Managing through winter weather while keeping feeding costs low is an essential part of maintaining a profitable operation. Iowa's climate generally allows forage growth only during a 7-to-8 month period. Extending the grazing of this forage--even an extra 3 or 4 weeks in late autumn and winter--is an economical way to maintain or increase livestock profitability. Some producers extend the grazing season by using stockpiled forage, whereas others use crop residue, and many combine the use of ...