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Descriptive And Longitudinal Observations On The Relationship Of Borderline Personality Disorder And Bipolar Disorder, John G. Gunderson, Igor Weinberg, Maria T. Daversa, Karsten D. Kueppenbender, Mary C. Zanarini, M. Tracie Shea, Andrew E. Skodol, Charles A. Sanislow, Shirley Yen, Leslie C. Morey, Carlos M. Grilo, Thomas H. Mcglashan, Robert L. Stout, Ingrid R. Dyck Jul 2006

Descriptive And Longitudinal Observations On The Relationship Of Borderline Personality Disorder And Bipolar Disorder, John G. Gunderson, Igor Weinberg, Maria T. Daversa, Karsten D. Kueppenbender, Mary C. Zanarini, M. Tracie Shea, Andrew E. Skodol, Charles A. Sanislow, Shirley Yen, Leslie C. Morey, Carlos M. Grilo, Thomas H. Mcglashan, Robert L. Stout, Ingrid R. Dyck

Division III Faculty Publications

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test whether borderline personality disorder is a variant of bipolar disorder by examining the rates of co-occurrence in both disorders, the effects of co-occurrence on a longitudinal course, and whether the presence of either disorder confers the risk for new onsets of the other.

METHOD: A prospective repeated-measures design with reliable independent diagnostic measures and 4 years of follow-up was used to assess 196 patients with borderline personality disorder and 433 patients with other personality disorders.

RESULTS: Patients with borderline personality disorder had a significantly higher co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (19.4 ...


Descriptive And Longitudinal Observations On The Relationship Of Borderline Personality Disorder And Bipolar Disorder, John G. Gunderson, Igor Weinberg, Maria T. Daversa, Karsten D. Kueppenbender, Mary C. Zanarini, M. Tracie Shea, Andrew E. Skodol, Charles A. Sanislow, Shirley Yen, Leslie C. Morey, Carlos M. Grilo, Thomas H. Mcglashan, Robert L. Stout, Ingrid R. Dyck Jun 2006

Descriptive And Longitudinal Observations On The Relationship Of Borderline Personality Disorder And Bipolar Disorder, John G. Gunderson, Igor Weinberg, Maria T. Daversa, Karsten D. Kueppenbender, Mary C. Zanarini, M. Tracie Shea, Andrew E. Skodol, Charles A. Sanislow, Shirley Yen, Leslie C. Morey, Carlos M. Grilo, Thomas H. Mcglashan, Robert L. Stout, Ingrid R. Dyck

Charles A. Sanislow, Ph.D.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test whether borderline personality disorder is a variant of bipolar disorder by examining the rates of co-occurrence in both disorders, the effects of co-occurrence on a longitudinal course, and whether the presence of either disorder confers the risk for new onsets of the other.

METHOD: A prospective repeated-measures design with reliable independent diagnostic measures and 4 years of follow-up was used to assess 196 patients with borderline personality disorder and 433 patients with other personality disorders.

RESULTS: Patients with borderline personality disorder had a significantly higher co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (19.4 ...


Predictors Of 2-Year Outcome For Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder, John G. Gunderson, Maria T. Daversa, Carlos M. Grilo, Thomas H. Mcglashan, Mary C. Zanarini, M. Tracie Shea, Andrew E. Skodol, Shirley Yen, Charles A. Sanislow, Donna S. Bender, Ingrid R. Dyck, Leslie C. Morey, Robert L. Stout May 2006

Predictors Of 2-Year Outcome For Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder, John G. Gunderson, Maria T. Daversa, Carlos M. Grilo, Thomas H. Mcglashan, Mary C. Zanarini, M. Tracie Shea, Andrew E. Skodol, Shirley Yen, Charles A. Sanislow, Donna S. Bender, Ingrid R. Dyck, Leslie C. Morey, Robert L. Stout

Division III Faculty Publications

OBJECTIVE: The primary purpose of this report was to investigate whether characteristics of subjects with borderline personality disorder observed at baseline can predict variations in outcome at the 2-year follow-up.

METHOD: Hypothesized predictor variables were selected from prior studies. The patients (N=160) were recruited from the four clinical sites of the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders, a modified version of that instrument; the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation; and the Childhood ...


Predictors Of 2-Year Outcome For Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder, John G. Gunderson, Maria T. Daversa, Carlos M. Grilo, Thomas H. Mcglashan, Mary C. Zanarini, M. Tracie Shea, Andrew E. Skodol, Shirley Yen, Charles A. Sanislow, Donna S. Bender, Ingrid R. Dyck, Leslie C. Morey, Robert L. Stout Apr 2006

Predictors Of 2-Year Outcome For Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder, John G. Gunderson, Maria T. Daversa, Carlos M. Grilo, Thomas H. Mcglashan, Mary C. Zanarini, M. Tracie Shea, Andrew E. Skodol, Shirley Yen, Charles A. Sanislow, Donna S. Bender, Ingrid R. Dyck, Leslie C. Morey, Robert L. Stout

Charles A. Sanislow, Ph.D.

OBJECTIVE: The primary purpose of this report was to investigate whether characteristics of subjects with borderline personality disorder observed at baseline can predict variations in outcome at the 2-year follow-up.

METHOD: Hypothesized predictor variables were selected from prior studies. The patients (N=160) were recruited from the four clinical sites of the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders, a modified version of that instrument; the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation; and the Childhood ...


Prospective Assessment Of Treatment Use By Patients With Personality Disorders, Donna S. Bender, Andrew E. Skodol, Maria E. Pagano, Ingrid R. Dyck, Carlos M. Grilo, M. Tracie Shea, Charles A. Sanislow, Mary C. Zanarini, Shirley Yen, Thomas H. Mcglashan, John G. Gunderson Feb 2006

Prospective Assessment Of Treatment Use By Patients With Personality Disorders, Donna S. Bender, Andrew E. Skodol, Maria E. Pagano, Ingrid R. Dyck, Carlos M. Grilo, M. Tracie Shea, Charles A. Sanislow, Mary C. Zanarini, Shirley Yen, Thomas H. Mcglashan, John G. Gunderson

Division III Faculty Publications

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the utilization of mental health treatments over a three-year period among patients with schizotypal, borderline, avoidant, or obsessive-compulsive personality disorders compared with patients with major depressive disorder and no personality disorder.

METHODS: A prospective, longitudinal study design was used to measure treatment use for 633 individuals aged 18 to 45 years during a three-year period.

RESULTS: Patients with borderline personality disorder were significantly more likely than those with major depressive disorder to use most types of treatment. Furthermore, all patients continued using high-intensity, low-duration treatments throughout the study period, whereas individual psychotherapy attendance declined significantly after ...


Prospective Assessment Of Treatment Use By Patients With Personality Disorders, Donna S. Bender, Andrew E. Skodol, Maria E. Pagano, Ingrid R. Dyck, Carlos M. Grilo, M. Tracie Shea, Charles A. Sanislow, Mary C. Zanarini, Shirley Yen, Thomas H. Mcglashan, John G. Gunderson Jan 2006

Prospective Assessment Of Treatment Use By Patients With Personality Disorders, Donna S. Bender, Andrew E. Skodol, Maria E. Pagano, Ingrid R. Dyck, Carlos M. Grilo, M. Tracie Shea, Charles A. Sanislow, Mary C. Zanarini, Shirley Yen, Thomas H. Mcglashan, John G. Gunderson

Charles A. Sanislow, Ph.D.

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the utilization of mental health treatments over a three-year period among patients with schizotypal, borderline, avoidant, or obsessive-compulsive personality disorders compared with patients with major depressive disorder and no personality disorder.

METHODS: A prospective, longitudinal study design was used to measure treatment use for 633 individuals aged 18 to 45 years during a three-year period.

RESULTS: Patients with borderline personality disorder were significantly more likely than those with major depressive disorder to use most types of treatment. Furthermore, all patients continued using high-intensity, low-duration treatments throughout the study period, whereas individual psychotherapy attendance declined significantly after ...