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New Extension Corn Production Web Site, Lori Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore Dec 2006

New Extension Corn Production Web Site, Lori Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore

Integrated Crop Management News

We've designed a new Web site for Iowa State University Extension corn production that has current and relevant management information for producing corn in Iowa. The Web site provides research-based recommendations and diagnostic tools for producers and agribusinesses. The largest section of the Web site is devoted to "Corn Management," which is broken into categories based on whether the topic addresses overarching production issues, such as cropping systems and rotations, or if the topic can be isolated to a certain time of the growing season (planting, early-season, mid-/late-season, harvest). For example, in the "Planting" category, users can find ...


A Response To Phenomenon In 2006: Multiple Ears Per Node, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth Dec 2006

A Response To Phenomenon In 2006: Multiple Ears Per Node, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth

Integrated Crop Management News

Corn hybrids from several companies expressed more than one ear at a single node from Iowa to Indiana in 2006. Multiple ears are not unexpected, but they typically occur at different nodes (as with prolific hybrids), not on the same node. This trait was expressed in different ways in Iowa. In the most extreme cases, up to eight ears occurred at a single node. Some have called these "bouquets." Ears on these plants were usually barren. In one case, a field with bouquet ears yielded 50 bu/acre.


Disaster Recovery—Managing Immature Crops For Grain Or Silage, Stephen K. Barnhart, Roger W. Elmore, Palle Pedersen, H. Mark Hanna Dec 2006

Disaster Recovery—Managing Immature Crops For Grain Or Silage, Stephen K. Barnhart, Roger W. Elmore, Palle Pedersen, H. Mark Hanna

Agriculture and Environment Extension Publications

Tips on managing crops that may not mature before the first killing freeze of fall.


More About Early Seed Discounts, Jim R. Rouse, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth Nov 2006

More About Early Seed Discounts, Jim R. Rouse, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth

Integrated Crop Management News

We received a great deal of feedback from our article in the October 9, 2006, issue of the ICM newsletterconcerning early seed discounts. Most of it was very positive and congratulated us for tackling an issue that is important to every grower. There were also a few readers who felt the article missed the mark, so we want to clarify some of the points.


Icm Conference Registration Opens Soon, Brent A. Pringnitz Oct 2006

Icm Conference Registration Opens Soon, Brent A. Pringnitz

Integrated Crop Management News

The 2006 Integrated Crop Management Conference and Agribusiness Expo will be held November 29-30, 2006, at the Iowa State Center complex in Ames. The conference will once again feature a program packed with the latest information on crop production and protection brought to you by Iowa State University specialists and invited speakers from around the Midwest. Returning this year is the Agribusiness Expo, held in Hilton Coliseum on Wednesday, November 29.


Early Seed Discounts Don't Always Pay, Lori Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore, Jim R. Rouse Oct 2006

Early Seed Discounts Don't Always Pay, Lori Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore, Jim R. Rouse

Integrated Crop Management News

Harvest is in full swing and as we wrap up the 2006 season, many begin to plan for 2007. The 2006 growing season, though, is extremely useful when planning for next year by looking at what did or did not work. One key component is hybrid selection. Seed companies are encouraging producers to purchase 2007 hybrids early by providing cash discounts. Most companies offer the greatest discount (8 to 10%) if hybrids are selected by approximately mid-November. While this discount is a substantial amount of money, especially with increasing seed costs, you do not want to move too hastily when ...


2006 Ag Chemical Dealer Updates, Brent A. Pringnitz Oct 2006

2006 Ag Chemical Dealer Updates, Brent A. Pringnitz

Integrated Crop Management News

Crop production changes at a rapid pace. New products, label revisions, regulatory requirements, soil nutrient recommendations--just some of the items you need to stay up-to-date on to better serve your customers. The Ag Chemical Dealer Updates are designed to do just that. The Ag Chemical Dealer Updates are intended to deliver the latest crop production recommendations, news, and information directly from Iowa State University Extension.


Liquid Nitrogen Controls Seed-Borne Chalcids Without Reducing Germination In Coriander Seeds, David A. Kovach, S. G. Mcclurg, Mark P. Widrlechner, David M. Brenner, Candice A. Gardner Oct 2006

Liquid Nitrogen Controls Seed-Borne Chalcids Without Reducing Germination In Coriander Seeds, David A. Kovach, S. G. Mcclurg, Mark P. Widrlechner, David M. Brenner, Candice A. Gardner

NCRPIS Publications and Papers

Coriander seeds are susceptible to infestation by chalcid wasps which often render the seeds inviable. Control of chalcids in seeds is a prerequisite for supplying coriander germplasm to requestors throughout the world. Levels of chalcid infestation in coriander seed samples produced at the North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station, in Ames, IA, mandated the need to develop an effective control strategy without harming the seeds. Storing the seeds above liquid nitrogen for 16 hours proved effective in killing chalcids at all life stages without reducing seed germination. Results were based on germination tests, seed dissection, chalcid emergence, and digital x-ray ...


Cornstalk Nitrate Interpretation, John E. Sawyer Sep 2006

Cornstalk Nitrate Interpretation, John E. Sawyer

Integrated Crop Management News

So you've gotten back the results of the cornstalk nitrate samples collected this fall. Now, what do the results mean? The stalk nitrate test is based on the concentration of nitrate-N in the lower cornstalk (8-inch segment from 6 to 14 inches above the ground) when the plant reaches maturity (ISU Extension publication PM 1584, Cornstalk testing to evaluate nitrogen management). In general, as the amount of plant-available N in the soil during the time period before plant maturity increases, nitrate in the lower stalk increases. However, the stalk nitrate-N concentration can be greatly influenced by other external and ...


Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator Web Tool Updated, John E. Sawyer Sep 2006

Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator Web Tool Updated, John E. Sawyer

Integrated Crop Management News

Last fall the Corn Nitrogen (N) Rate Calculator Web tool went online. It is a resource that aids N-rate decisions for corn production and is helpful in determining the effect of fertilizer price on application rates. The method for calculating suggested N rates is based on a regional (Corn Belt) approach to nitrogen-rate guidelines. Details on the approach are provided in the regional publication, Concepts and Rationale for Regional Nitrogen Rate Guidelines for Corn, PM 2015. Background information and interpretation of suggested N-rate guidelines were previously provided in an ICM newsletter article.


Bean Pod Mottle Virus: Back With A Vengeance, John H. Hill, Palle Pedersen, Jeffrey D. Bradshaw Aug 2006

Bean Pod Mottle Virus: Back With A Vengeance, John H. Hill, Palle Pedersen, Jeffrey D. Bradshaw

Integrated Crop Management News

As stated in an earlier article in the ICM Newsletter (May 15, 2006), bean leaf beetles are back with a vengeance this year. Based on observations from agronomists across the state, this year seems to have the highest level of bean leaf beetles since 2002. This also has resulted in an apparent high incidence of bean pod mottle virus disease in Iowa fields. Infected plants can be characterized by the leaves, which show a yellow to green blotchy appearance called leaf mottle. Sometimes leaves have a raised or blistered appearance.


Corn Now Planted Earlier Than Ever Before!, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth Jul 2006

Corn Now Planted Earlier Than Ever Before!, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth

Integrated Crop Management News

The fact that corn is now planted earlier than ever before is not a surprise to most of you. Many have discussed this and have known intuitively that it has happened. Although we are still in the middle of the growing season, let's take a step back and investigate overall trends occurring in Iowa. In this article, we look at National Agricultural Statistics Service data on corn planting progress over the last three decades to add some actual numbers to the discussion. By comparing when 50 percent of the corn crop has been planted, it is clear that planting ...


In Vitro Bile Acid Binding Activity Within Flour Fractions From Oat Lines With Typical And High Β-Glucan Amounts, Sedat Sayar, Jean-Luc Jannink, Pamela J. White Jul 2006

In Vitro Bile Acid Binding Activity Within Flour Fractions From Oat Lines With Typical And High Β-Glucan Amounts, Sedat Sayar, Jean-Luc Jannink, Pamela J. White

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

Whole flours from four oat lines with different amounts of β-glucan (4.8−8.1%) were examined for their antioxidant activity and total phenolic and lignin concentrations. These data, along with the β-glucan percentages, were compared with bile acid (BA) binding. Only the lignin concentrations of the flours significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with the BA binding values. The oat flours also were fractionated into bran, protein concentrate, starch, layer above starch, and soluble β-glucan (SBG)-free flour, and their BA binding capacities were evaluated. The bran fractions were the only fractions that bound greater BA than did the whole oat flours on dry matter basis. Extraction of the soluble β-glucan to create the SBG-free flour significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the BA binding of the remaining flour. These data suggest that BA binding of the oat flours involves the synergistic interactions of the oat components, with β-glucan and lignin (insoluble fiber) having a great impact.


Dry Weather: Worried About High Nitrates In Forages?, Stephen K. Barnhart Jul 2006

Dry Weather: Worried About High Nitrates In Forages?, Stephen K. Barnhart

Integrated Crop Management News

During periods of dry growing conditions, forage producers begin to ask about the increased risk of nitrate accumulation in forages and how best to manage them. Plants take up nitrogen from available soil sources during normal plant growth. Soil-source nitrates are used by the plant to form protein. Since photosynthesis-formed sugars are also components of protein, anything that influences normal plant growth (such as drought) will reduce protein synthesis, and nitrate (NO3) can accumulate in the plant in higher than normal amounts.


Greensnap In Iowa, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth, George Cummins Jul 2006

Greensnap In Iowa, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth, George Cummins

Integrated Crop Management News

Straight-line winds as high as 60 mph caused considerable greensnap in corn across north-central and northeast Iowa last Saturday evening, July 1. Damage was more frequent and most severe in a narrow, long band running from eastern Cerro Gordo County generally along county road B60 and across several counties to the east and northeast and included the Iowa State University Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm at Nashua.


Late-Summer Seeding Of Forage Crops, Stephen K. Barnhart Jun 2006

Late-Summer Seeding Of Forage Crops, Stephen K. Barnhart

Integrated Crop Management News

Late summer can be an excellent time to establish forage crops, provided there is sufficient moisture for germination and good seedling growth. It is also a good time to seed in bare or thin spots in forage stands established this spring. The following steps will improve the chances for successful forage stand establishment in late summer.


Large Common Lambsquarters Is A Problem For Glyphosate, Micheal D. Owen Jun 2006

Large Common Lambsquarters Is A Problem For Glyphosate, Micheal D. Owen

Integrated Crop Management News

Recent lack of rain, and windy conditions that hampered herbicide applications, have resulted in weedy fields that are effectively reducing yields in corn and soybean. A particular concern is fields with heavy populations of common lambsquarters that have not been controlled effectively by glyphosate. In discussions with growers and applicators, the failure of glyphosate, even when applied at 48 oz per acre (1.1 lb ae/acre) to provide control, does not appear to be attributable to evolved resistance to glyphosate, but rather a combination of factors: common lambsquarters that is too large and has developed during dry conditions, and ...


Make Sure You Know What You Are Spraying!, Micheal D. Owen Jun 2006

Make Sure You Know What You Are Spraying!, Micheal D. Owen

Integrated Crop Management News

Given the difficulties in getting POST herbicides applied and the aggressive weed growth that is effectively reducing crop yields, it seems that due consideration of the "details" has been avoided. This has resulted in costly unintended consequences: loss of fields due to herbicide treatments contaminated with other herbicides or the application of the wrong herbicide (e.g., glyphosate applied to Liberty Link® corn). It is important that sprayers and nurse tanks be safely and thoroughly rinsed prior to switching herbicides and/or crops. Also, take the time to check and make sure you are spraying the correct field, corn hybrid ...


Field Soil Variability And Its Impact On Crop Stand Uniformity, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, H. Mark Hanna Jun 2006

Field Soil Variability And Its Impact On Crop Stand Uniformity, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, H. Mark Hanna

Integrated Crop Management News

Soil variability plays a significant role in crop performance, especially in dry conditions, where spatial variability of soil texture can show the moisture shortage effect on plant stand variability across the field. Generally, soil is not uniform and immense spatial soil texture variability can be noticed across fields (see the June 12, 2006, ICM article (pages 169-171), What's the yield effect of uneven corn heights?). Soil texture is a key factor in influencing soil's water-holding capacity. Coarse-textured soils have a lower moisture-holding capacity due to high porosity and ability to drain excess water quicker than fine-textured soils.


Soil And Water Cca Credit Opportunity At Tile Installation Field Day--July 12, James A. Fawcett Jun 2006

Soil And Water Cca Credit Opportunity At Tile Installation Field Day--July 12, James A. Fawcett

Integrated Crop Management News

Certified crop advisers (CCAs) can obtain 3 hours of credit in soil and water management by attending a special session at the Tile Installation Field Day at the Southeast Iowa Research and Demonstration Farm near Crawfordsville on July 12. The Tile Installation Field Day will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will include the opportunity to see tiling machines in operation in the field as well as educational and commercial exhibits. The CCA session will begin at 11 a.m. with a viewing of trenching and plowing tiling machines in operation.


What's The Yield Effect Of Uneven Corn Heights?, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth Jun 2006

What's The Yield Effect Of Uneven Corn Heights?, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth

Integrated Crop Management News

Many corn fields across Iowa had significant variation in plant emergence and early-season growth within fields. Uneven emergence and plant heights are caused by several factors, including variation in soil temperature, seeding depth, residue distribution, soil crusting, and soil moisture, etc. Iowa producers dealt specifically with variable soil temperatures this year, which have now caused variable plant heights and vigor. How much can plant height vary before it causes a real yield loss? And based on this, should we have replanted more? Four percent of Iowa's corn acreage was replanted this year (National Agricultural Statistics Service [NASS], 5 June ...


Crop Diagnostic Clinics: New Choices And Format, Brent A. Pringnitz Jun 2006

Crop Diagnostic Clinics: New Choices And Format, Brent A. Pringnitz

Integrated Crop Management News

The Field Extension Education Laboratory (FEEL) Crop Diagnostic Clinics have been providing hands-on agronomic training since 1987. These intensive, two-day classes focus on developing in-field diagnostic and management skills. FEEL features 43 acres of demonstrations on corn, soybean, and forage production.


Late Spring Fescue Management Considerations, Stephen K. Barnhart Jun 2006

Late Spring Fescue Management Considerations, Stephen K. Barnhart

Integrated Crop Management News

Tall fescue is a useful perennial forage grass for Iowa. It is adapted to a wide number of soils, has a long growing season, and is suitable for use in mixtures with other forage grasses and legumes. Unfortunately, many of the tall fescue plants in Iowa pastures harbor a fungus (called an endophyte) that can cause nutritional and physiological problems for livestock grazing these pastures.


To Be Determined: Ear Row Numbers And Kernels Per Row In Corn, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth May 2006

To Be Determined: Ear Row Numbers And Kernels Per Row In Corn, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth

Integrated Crop Management News

Want to increase corn yield potential? Aim for increasing kernel numbers! Yield is a function of kernel number and kernel weight. The number of kernels per acre will vary based on other components including plants per acre, ears per plant, and kernels per ear. We discussed the proper seeding rates in an April 10Integrated Crop Management article, What is the best seeding rate for corn based on seed prices and yield level?. The number of ears per plant is primarily influenced by hybrid. Most hybrids grown in Iowa have one dominant ear, although some "prolific" hybrids are available that ...


Mid-April Soil Temperature Swings Result In Poor Corn Stands And Replanting, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth May 2006

Mid-April Soil Temperature Swings Result In Poor Corn Stands And Replanting, Roger W. Elmore, Lori Abendroth

Integrated Crop Management News

Soil temperature swings were dramatic in mid-April across Iowa. This variability in soil temperatures has been the conversation topic of many agronomists. Recent ICM articles have covered guidelines for replanting corn and corn seedling health due to poor stands (refer to the May 22, 2006, ICM article on pages 131-132, Corn seedling health and stand establishment).


Horsetail, Scouring Rush, Skeletonweed, Etc., Etc., Etc., Robert G. Hartzler, Micheal D. Owen May 2006

Horsetail, Scouring Rush, Skeletonweed, Etc., Etc., Etc., Robert G. Hartzler, Micheal D. Owen

Integrated Crop Management News

The main problem with common names is that some plants may be described by 10 or more names. Field horsetail (Equisetum arense) is one of those species--while the species is easily distinguished from any other plant due to its unique growth habit, the myriad of names used to describe the plant leads to confusion in its identification.


Activities For Ag Professionals--June 16, George Cummins, James A. Fawcett May 2006

Activities For Ag Professionals--June 16, George Cummins, James A. Fawcett

Integrated Crop Management News

Friday, June 16--Ag Professional Tour at the Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm, Nashua, 9:30 a.m.-12 noon. The program will include observations and experiences related to current crop growth and development, soil fertility, and pest management problems as they develop across the area; a review of the various research projects underway on the research farm and with on-farm cooperators; and a discussion of the new technologies/products that are or soon will be available to our clients.


Cca Credit Opportunity--June 22, George Cummins, James A. Fawcett May 2006

Cca Credit Opportunity--June 22, George Cummins, James A. Fawcett

Integrated Crop Management News

Thursday, June 22--CCA morning session and afternoon field day tour at the Southeast Research and Demonstration Farm, near Crawfordsville. Certified Crop Advisers (CCAs) can earn 5 hours of credit (1.5 hour in soil and water management, 1 in crop production, 1.5 in pest management, and 1 in soil fertility) by attending. The morning session will begin at 9:00 a.m. with a presentation by Rick Cruse, Iowa State University agronomy professor, on "Tillage Impacts on the Soil Environment, Soil Compaction, and Root Development."


What's There To Lose...With Replanted Corn?, Lori Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore May 2006

What's There To Lose...With Replanted Corn?, Lori Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore

Integrated Crop Management News

It seems inevitable that we cannot get through a spring without talking about replant issues to some degree. Although the majority of the corn in the state appears to be fine, there are some areas that will have to deal with replanting. Mark Carlton, extension field crops specialist in south-central Iowa, has reported seeing fields that need to be replanted due to a lack of coleoptile growth or mesocotyl rot. (See "Corn seedling health and stand establishment" on page 131.)


Check Root Development In Corn Fields, Lori Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore May 2006

Check Root Development In Corn Fields, Lori Abendroth, Roger W. Elmore

Integrated Crop Management News

Mesocotyl rot is occurring in corn seedlings at some locations in Iowa. Alison Robertson addressed this inCorn seedling health and stand establishment in this issue. Is this important once the corn has emerged and with the warm temperatures we are now receiving? Proper root development during these next few weeks is critical to the success of the crop. Corn has two root systems that are easily visible early in the year. The initial root system, the seminal roots, is comprised of the radicle and lateral seminal roots. The seminal roots help anchor the young seedling and provide it with ...