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Sfa Gardens Newsletter, Oct 2006, Sfa Gardens, Stephen F. Austin State University Oct 2006

Sfa Gardens Newsletter, Oct 2006, Sfa Gardens, Stephen F. Austin State University

SFA Gardens Newsletters

No abstract provided.


Alstroemeria, Aileen Reid Oct 2006

Alstroemeria, Aileen Reid

Bulletins 4000 -

About 60 species of Alstroemeria grow wild in South America, in habitats ranging from the snowline of the Andes and high mountain plateaus down through the highland forests to the coastal deserts.

A member of the lily family, Alstroemeria grows from a rhizome that also develops tuberous storage outgrowths and fleshy roots. The aerial shoots can be either vegetative or reproductive. Normally shoots that have unfolded more than 30 leaves will not flower and remain vegetative.

The leaves of Alstroemeria are unusual in that they rotate through 180 degrees as they unfold, so that the upper surface becomes the lower ...


Sfa Gardens Newsletter, July 2006, Sfa Gardens, Stephen F. Austin State University Jul 2006

Sfa Gardens Newsletter, July 2006, Sfa Gardens, Stephen F. Austin State University

SFA Gardens Newsletters

No abstract provided.


Growing Chinese Cabbage In Western Australia, John Burt, Dennis Phillips, David Gatter Jun 2006

Growing Chinese Cabbage In Western Australia, John Burt, Dennis Phillips, David Gatter

Bulletins 4000 -

Chinese cabbage is a member of the Brassiceae family, which may be called brassicas, crucifers or cole crops. This includes various crops such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, radish, turnips, swedes and weeds such as wild radish.

In general trade, the term Chinese cabbage can loosely be given to both the heading types (Brasssica rapa L. subsp. pekinensis) and to non heading types such as pak-choi (Brassica rapa L. subsp. chinensis). This Bulletin deals with the heading type of Chinese cabbage. The Chinese name is Wong Bok, and this name is often used in Australia.


Baby Boabs : The Exciting New Taste Sensation From The Kimberley In Western Australia, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia Mar 2006

Baby Boabs : The Exciting New Taste Sensation From The Kimberley In Western Australia, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia

Bulletins 4000 -

Baby boabs are the seedling stage of the large boab trees found in the Kimberley region. The seed of the fruit found in pods attached to the tree is planted and then grown for approximately 16 weeks depending on the season. This produces a tuber up to 30 centimetres long, with fresh, succulent, edible leaves on top.

The boab tubers are very versatile and can be used in most dishes both raw and cooked. The texture of the tubers are crisp and crunchy like that of a water chestnut but with a refreshing taste that can adapt to the other ...


Sfa Gardens Newsletter, Jan 2006, Sfa Gardens, Stephen F. Austin State University Jan 2006

Sfa Gardens Newsletter, Jan 2006, Sfa Gardens, Stephen F. Austin State University

SFA Gardens Newsletters

No abstract provided.


Pineywoods Native Plant Center, Winter 2006, Sfa Gardens, Stephen F. Austin State University Jan 2006

Pineywoods Native Plant Center, Winter 2006, Sfa Gardens, Stephen F. Austin State University

SFA Gardens Newsletters

No abstract provided.


Nematodes In Western Australian Vineyards, Vivien Vanstone, Neil Lantzke Jan 2006

Nematodes In Western Australian Vineyards, Vivien Vanstone, Neil Lantzke

Bulletins 4000 -

Nematodes are worm-like microscopic animals that live in the soil. There are numerous soil-inhabiting nematode species, but not all are harmful to plants. Some nematodes are plant-parasitic, feeding on and damaging roots, including those of grapevine. Feeding activities of these nematodes reduce the vine’s ability to take up water and nutrients from the soil, leading to lack of vigour, symptoms of nutrient deficiency, wilting, lower yield, vine decline and, in severe cases, vine death. Nematode feeding sites can also lead to entry of other disease-causing organisms (e.g. fungi or bacteria), resulting in rapid vine decline.

Nematodes can survive ...


Phytophthora Diseases Of Cutflower Crops, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia Jan 2006

Phytophthora Diseases Of Cutflower Crops, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia

Bulletins 4000 -

Phytophthora root rot is the most common soil borne disease causing plant death in native cut flower production. It is also a pathogen of exotic cutflower crops such as rose, lily, carnation, proteas and gerbera. The fungus, Phytophthora cinnamomi, the cause of jarrah dieback is the pathogen that first comes to mind when Phytophthora is mentioned. This has one of the widest host ranges of all Phytophthora species, particularly amongst native Australia species. P.nicotianae also has a wide host range, infecting a wide range of exotic, as well as Australian native flower crops. There are also a number of ...


Apples At A Glance From Western Australia, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia Jan 2006

Apples At A Glance From Western Australia, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia

Bulletins 4000 -

Western Australia produces a range of horticultural commodities including fruit, vegetables, flowers, nursery products and wine as part of its fast $670 million growing horticultural industry. Natural advantages such as climate and clean environment, soils and water make Western Australia an ideal place to supply a variety of high quality produce to domestic and international markets.

The apple industry in Western Australia has reached optimal yields from well established orchards. Production is currently estimated at a value of $37 million. Western Australia is the second major apple exporter in Australia. Around 20 per cent of the state's production of ...