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Frozen Beetle Treats Are Environmentally Friendly, W. John Hayden Aug 2006

Frozen Beetle Treats Are Environmentally Friendly, W. John Hayden

Biology Faculty Publications

At my rural household, the most vexatious insect pest has got to be the ubiquitous Japanese beetle. Native to Japan, these pests have infested most of eastern North America, with isolated infestations appearing in some western states. One reason that Japanese beetles are so bad is that they deliver a double-whammy: the larvae (grubs) consume roots and are particularly destructive of turf and pasture grasses while the adults consume leaves and flowers of a wide variety of plants, leaving behind skeletonized versions of the plant parts consumed.


Be Creative When Controlling Invasive Plant Species, W. John Hayden Jun 2006

Be Creative When Controlling Invasive Plant Species, W. John Hayden

Biology Faculty Publications

We are often told that every cloud has a silver lining, but when it comes to invasive exotic species, it seems that the proverbial silver lining is vanishingly thin. Invasives like kudzu, Japanese honeysuckle, tree-of-heaven, and oh-so-many others, seem ubiquitous, crowding out native plants and altering all manner of ecological interactions. Like a rock tossed in a placid pond, the negative impact of an exotic species can ripple throughout the entire ecological community. Further, populations of invasive plants can be so large and so extensive across the countryside that complete eradication is simply out of the question. The genie is ...


Woy '06: Spicebush Provides A Salad Bar To Some Caterpillars, W. John Hayden Feb 2006

Woy '06: Spicebush Provides A Salad Bar To Some Caterpillars, W. John Hayden

Biology Faculty Publications

While many wildflower enthusiasts appreciate spicebush (Lindera benzoin), the 2006 Virginia Wildflower of the Year, for its subtle beauty, plant ecologists have found this humble shrub to be a fruitful subject for scientific inquiry. The notes that follow relay just a few of the interesting nuggets that can be gleaned from a cursory study of the scientific literature about this plant.


2006 Wildflower Of The Year: Spicebush, Lindera Benzoin, W. John Hayden Jan 2006

2006 Wildflower Of The Year: Spicebush, Lindera Benzoin, W. John Hayden

Biology Faculty Publications

Spicebush is a multistemmed deciduous shrub that grows to a height of one to three meters. Young stems are delicate and may be smooth or finely hairy. Leaves are alternate and simple, with an elliptic to obovate blade that tapers at both the base and apex and is bounded by a smooth margin. Examined closely, the margin will reveal a series of fine hairs that project directly out from the leaf edge. In size, leaves are neither remarkably large nor small; they range from one to six inches in length and up to about two and a half inches wide ...