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Recombinant Watermelon (Citrullus Lanatus) Hydroperoxide Lyase And Uses Thereof, David Hildebrand, Hirotada Fukushige Dec 2006

Recombinant Watermelon (Citrullus Lanatus) Hydroperoxide Lyase And Uses Thereof, David Hildebrand, Hirotada Fukushige

Plant and Soil Sciences Faculty Patents

Recombinant watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) hydroperoxide lyase protein, DNA sequences encoding the protein, vectors containing the DNA sequences and hosts containing the vectors are provided, together with methods for recombinantly producing watermelon hydroperoxide lyase, DNA sequences, vectors and hosts.


Forage News [2006-12], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Dec 2006

Forage News [2006-12], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • Grazing Conference
  • FEED: Biggest Cost Item
  • Heart of America Grazing Conference
  • KFGC Presents Annual Awards
  • KFGC Installs New Officers
  • Fayette County Producer Becomes Forage Spokesperson
  • Kentucky Hay – 2006
  • Methods to Manage Soil Phosphorus Levels on Kentucky Poultry Farms
  • Meat Goat Performance and Carcass Parameters When Finished on Orchardgrass, Red Clover, or Alfalfa Pastures
  • The Case for Forage Legumes
  • Upcoming Events


Kfgc Forage Spokesman Contest, Todd A. Clark, Farms, Inc., Robey Farms Nov 2006

Kfgc Forage Spokesman Contest, Todd A. Clark, Farms, Inc., Robey Farms

Kentucky Grazing Conference

No abstract provided.


New Options For Extending Grazing, Edward N. Ballard Nov 2006

New Options For Extending Grazing, Edward N. Ballard

Kentucky Grazing Conference

Feed costs represent the major cost in most livestock production systems. A recently completed analysis of 225 Standardized Performance Analysis (SPA) Beef Cow Records on herds in Illinois and Iowa showed that feed cost was the overriding factor determining profitability, explaining over 57 percent of the herd-to-herd variation.


Dollars & Cents Of Intensive Grazing, Kenneth H. Burdine Nov 2006

Dollars & Cents Of Intensive Grazing, Kenneth H. Burdine

Kentucky Grazing Conference

A rotational grazing system can generally be defined as the use of several pastures with one being grazed while the others are rested. On the contrary, conventional or continuous grazing systems allow livestock access to the entire pasture area and let them decide where, what, and how long to graze. In most cases, Kentucky pastures employing continuous grazing systems are too large for efficient management and forage utilization. In such instances, cattle overgraze more palatable forages and areas close to shade and water, while other sections of the pasture are underutilized. This leads to lower animal output per acre than ...


Uk Horse Pasture Evaluation Program, Tom Keene, S. Ray Smith Nov 2006

Uk Horse Pasture Evaluation Program, Tom Keene, S. Ray Smith

Kentucky Grazing Conference

The University of Kentucky is developing stronger ties with the state’s horse industry in the areas of research, extension and teaching. Many horse farms in the bluegrass region are interested in UK’s assistance with pasture evaluation. During the fall of 2005 a team from the UK Forage Extension Program (Ray Smith, Tom Keene, Jesse Morrison, Gabriel Roberts) conducted a pilot project to evaluate horse pastures on 14 central KY farms. One of the focuses of the pilot was the evaluation of pastures for percent tall fescue and the potential of fescue stands to cause fescue toxicity in pregnant ...


Managing Pasture Growth And Quality With Grazing, S. Ray Smith Nov 2006

Managing Pasture Growth And Quality With Grazing, S. Ray Smith

Kentucky Grazing Conference

One of the keys to profitable livestock production is to minimize the costs of producing a marketable animal or animal product. Feed costs are commonly 70-80 percent of the cost of growing or maintaining an animal. Pastures provide feed at a cost of .01-.02 cents/lb of TDN while hay costs .04-.06 cents/lb TDN. Improved pasture management offers the single greatest opportunity to lower production costs, assuming that animal genetics, health, marketing procedures, and other areas of management have been addressed. A primary goal of livestock producers should be to utilize grazed forage for as many months ...


Everyday Cattle Graze Is Money Saved, Garry D. Lacefield Nov 2006

Everyday Cattle Graze Is Money Saved, Garry D. Lacefield

Kentucky Grazing Conference

During one of my first visits to New Zealand over twenty years ago, I had the opportunity to visit many different dairy, beef, sheep and deer farms. While visiting a dairy farm, I remember the farmer telling me about his grazing program and their goal to “optimize grazing and minimize stored feed.” I remember him saying, “everyday grazed is money saved”. I admit, the reality of that statement didn’t truly sink in that day; but over the years, the truth of what he said has not only “sunk in” but has been reinforced by visits to other farms literally ...


Bermudagrass In Kentucky, David C. Ditsch Nov 2006

Bermudagrass In Kentucky, David C. Ditsch

Kentucky Grazing Conference

Interest in bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers] is increasing in Kentucky as livestock producers continue their search for warm-season perennial forages capable of filling in the mid-summer growth slump we commonly experience with our traditional cool-season grasses. This is partially due to the recent availability of seeded bermudagrass varieties with improved winter hardiness thereby reducing establishment cost and increasing the odds of success.


Grazing Corn, Chad Lee Nov 2006

Grazing Corn, Chad Lee

Kentucky Grazing Conference

Grazing is the cheapest form of feed for cattle. While perennial grasses and alfalfa are reliable components to a grazing system, another component could be corn.

Grazing corn is an option for a couple of situations: 1) as a bridge crop when pasture renovation is needed, and 2) as an insurance crop in an overall grazing system.


Forages On The Web, Scott Flynn Nov 2006

Forages On The Web, Scott Flynn

Kentucky Grazing Conference

No abstract provided.


Foreword And Kfgc Award Winners [2006], Garry D. Lacefield, Christi L. Forsythe Nov 2006

Foreword And Kfgc Award Winners [2006], Garry D. Lacefield, Christi L. Forsythe

Kentucky Grazing Conference

No abstract provided.


Hydrologic Properties Of Pervious Concrete, Joe D. Luck, Stephen R. Workman, Stephen F. Higgins, Mark S. Coyne Nov 2006

Hydrologic Properties Of Pervious Concrete, Joe D. Luck, Stephen R. Workman, Stephen F. Higgins, Mark S. Coyne

Plant and Soil Sciences Faculty Publications

Pervious concrete is concrete made by eliminating most or all of the fine aggregate (sand) in the concrete mix, which allows interconnected void spaces to be formed in the hardened product. These interconnected void spaces allow the concrete to transmit water at relatively high rates. The main objective of this project was to conduct research on the potential application of pervious concrete in agricultural settings, specifically for use in animal feed lots, manure storage pads, animal manure and bedding compost facilities, or floor systems in animal buildings. Laboratory tests were conducted on replicated samples of pervious concrete formed from two ...


Forage News [2006-11], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Nov 2006

Forage News [2006-11], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • Kentucky Grazing Conference in Lexington, November 21
  • Cash Receipts Highlights – 2005
  • Loss of a Legend
  • Hay Is in the Barn…
  • New Executive Secretary for AFGC
  • Alfalfa’s Makeover
  • Effect of Sericea Lespedeza Hay on Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection in Goats
  • Upcoming Events


Forage News [2006-10], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Oct 2006

Forage News [2006-10], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • KFGC Field Day Huge Success in Spite of 4” of Rain
  • Roundup Ready Grazing Tolerant Alfalfa: Application for Kentucky
  • 26 Roundup Ready Alfalfa Varieties
  • Hay Export Markets May Benefit All Growers
  • Prevent Machinery Fires
  • Ethanol Growth Challenges Hay Markets
  • Hay Production Up
  • Upcoming Events


Biologic Cycling Of Silica Across A Grassland Bioclimosequence, S. W. Blecker, Rebecca L. Mcculley, O. A. Chadwick, E. F. Kelly Sep 2006

Biologic Cycling Of Silica Across A Grassland Bioclimosequence, S. W. Blecker, Rebecca L. Mcculley, O. A. Chadwick, E. F. Kelly

Plant and Soil Sciences Faculty Publications

The dynamics of biologic Si cycling in grassland ecosystems are largely unknown and likely to impact mineral weathering rates regionally and diatom productivity globally; key regulatory processes in the global Si cycle are closely tied to the global carbon cycle. Across a bioclimatic sequence spanning major grassland ecosystems in the Great Plains, soil biogenic silica depth distributions are similar to that of soil organic carbon; however, unlike soil organic carbon, quantities of soil biogenic silica decrease with increasing precipitation, despite an increase in annual biogenic inputs through litterfall across the same gradient. Though comprising only 1–3% of the total ...


Forage News [2006-09], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Sep 2006

Forage News [2006-09], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • Forage Field Day
  • Stockpile Production: Does It Pay to Fertilize in Fall Given the High Cost of Nitrogen Fertilizer?
  • Can You Successfully “Thicken-Up” Old Alfalfa Stands?
  • Fall Seeding Grasses
  • What a Difference a Year Makes…
  • Monitor Wet Hay to Prevent Fire
  • Forage Spokesman Nominations
  • Rake Design Doesn’t Impact Hay Quality
  • KFGC Awards Nominations
  • Upcoming Events


Forage News [2006-08], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Aug 2006

Forage News [2006-08], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • KFGC Awards Nominations
  • Forage Spokesman Nominations
  • UK Robinson Station to Host College of Ag Field Day
  • Kentucky Department of Agriculture Forage Testing Program
  • More Hay…..
  • Guidelines for Successful Forage Establishment
  • Upcoming Events


Forage News [2006-07], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Jul 2006

Forage News [2006-07], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • Determining Forage Moisture Content Using a Microwave Oven
  • KFGC Field Day
  • Kentucky: Did You Know
  • KFGC Awards Program
  • Forage Spokesman Nominations
  • Hay Storage Demonstration Farm Project Evaluating Impact of Indoor Storage
  • Agrotain Reduces Ammonia Loss from Surface-Applied Urea
  • Grazing Corn
  • Upcoming Events


Forage News [2006-06], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Jun 2006

Forage News [2006-06], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • UK Animal Research Center Field Day
  • Effect of Storage Method on Round Bale Hay Loss
  • Kentucky Milk Production
  • Kentucky Welcomes Dr. Rebecca McCulley
  • Average Prices Received by Farmers–(Dollars)
  • Bioterrorism & Hay
  • Reducing Broiler Litter Application Rates Can Still Produce High Yield and Quality in Sorghum Sudangrass
  • Measuring Variation in Alfalfa Yield and Stand Using Conventional Remote Sensing Techniques
  • Upcoming Events


Methods And Compositions For Expressing Multiple Genes In Plants By Alternate Splicing Of A Polycistronic Message, Indu Bhushan Maiti, Somnath Bhattacharyya May 2006

Methods And Compositions For Expressing Multiple Genes In Plants By Alternate Splicing Of A Polycistronic Message, Indu Bhushan Maiti, Somnath Bhattacharyya

Kentucky Tobacco Research and Development Center Faculty Patents

The present invention provides a method and composition for expression of multiple genes from a polycistronic message in transgenic plants using genetic elements derived from the peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus promoter-leader sequence and antisense sequence of PC1SV ORF VII. Also provided are compositions and methods for intron-mediated enhanced and regulated expression of genes in transgenic plants.


Forage News [2006-05], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences May 2006

Forage News [2006-05], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • Barren County Continued as Cattle Capital of Kentucky
  • Storing Alfalfa as Round Bale Silage: Frequently Asked Questions
  • Cowpea Aphid in Kentucky Alfalfa
  • Disk vs. Sickle Cutterbar Mowers
  • Organic Hay
  • UK Beef/Forage Field Day June 15
  • Last Chance!!!
  • Upcoming Events


Forage News [2006-04], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Apr 2006

Forage News [2006-04], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • 27th Kentucky Alfalfa Conference Date Set
  • 7th Kentucky Grazing Conference Date Set
  • Heart of America Grazing Conference in Illinois
  • Proceedings Available On-Line
  • KFGC Forage Field Day
  • Kentucky Producer Wins 1st Place at AFGC Hay Show
  • UK Robinson Station to Host College of Ag Field Day
  • Kentucky Reaps Awards at AFGC Meeting
  • WKU Students Play Prominent Role at AFGC Meeting
  • Rooting Depth of Alfalfa
  • Environmental and Economic Evaluation of Grass and Corn Based Production Systems
  • On a Maryland Beef Farm
  • The Economics of Organic and Grazing Dairy Farms
  • Reminder - Don’t Forget!!!
  • Upcoming Events


[Review Of] Stable Isotopes And Biosphere–Atmosphere Interactions: Processes And Biological Controls, Mark S. Coyne Mar 2006

[Review Of] Stable Isotopes And Biosphere–Atmosphere Interactions: Processes And Biological Controls, Mark S. Coyne

Plant and Soil Sciences Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Forage News [2006-03], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences Mar 2006

Forage News [2006-03], University Of Kentucky Department Of Plant And Soil Sciences

Forage News

  • 26th Kentucky Alfalfa Conference
  • Alfalfa Award Recipients Honored
  • Improved Alfalfa Varieties
  • Kentucky Forage & Grassland Council Awards for 2006
  • How are Pasture Quality, Soil Quality, and Soil Organic Carbon Content Linked? Lessons from South Central Iowa
  • Common Red Clover
  • Poultry Litter Rate Study in Tall Fescue
  • Stockpiling Publication Revised
  • Mailing List Update
  • Upcoming Events


Forage Testing Program, Michael Judge Feb 2006

Forage Testing Program, Michael Judge

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Livestock farmers who need hay can find it right here in Kentucky. Listings of farms with hay for sale can be found on the Hay and Forage Program page of the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s Web site, www.kyagr.com.


Why Dairy Farmers Need And Want High Quality Alfalfa Hay: Quality Of Hay = Performance And Profitability, Donna M. Amaral-Phillips Feb 2006

Why Dairy Farmers Need And Want High Quality Alfalfa Hay: Quality Of Hay = Performance And Profitability, Donna M. Amaral-Phillips

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Why do dairy farmers want high quality forages, including alfalfa hay, to feed to their milking herds? Feeding high-quality forages results in greater feed intake and as a result, dairy cows produce more milk, and they often times can produce this milk more economically. With advancing stage of plant maturity, fiber digestibility and protein content of the alfalfa plant decreases while the amount of fiber increases. Consequently, less energy is available to the cow when it consumes more mature alfalfa. Energy is the nutrient that most often limits performance in dairy or beef cattle - not protein. The take home message ...


Alfalfa Hay For Horses, Robert Coleman Feb 2006

Alfalfa Hay For Horses, Robert Coleman

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

When horse owners consider hay for their animals a number of criteria are generally considered. Of major importance is the hay must be free of mold and dust, it needs to contain nutrients needed by the horse and it must be palatable. If these criteria are met, the type of hay should not matter. However, that is not the case with many horse owners. When discussing hay, many owners first consider the type of hay. Can it be alfalfa or should it be a grass or how about a mix of grass and a legume. If a group of horse ...


Interpreting Forage Quality Test Reports, Donna M. Amaral-Phillips Feb 2006

Interpreting Forage Quality Test Reports, Donna M. Amaral-Phillips

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Forages are the foundation for building diets for beef and dairy cattle, horses, sheep and goats. The quality of these forages directly impacts forage intake, animal performance, and, ultimately, the profitability to their owners. As the quality of forages decline, consumption of that forage decreases and the amount of grain or byproducts which must be fed increases. The cost for a unit of performance increases and/or the animal can not perform (i.e. milk or gain) to the optimum level thus lowering profitability to the animal owner. These relationships are especially true with young and high performance ruminants, such ...


Moisture Management In Hay Making And Storage, Tom Keene, Doug Overhults Feb 2006

Moisture Management In Hay Making And Storage, Tom Keene, Doug Overhults

Kentucky Alfalfa and Stored Forage Conference

Making hay in central Kentucky can be one of the most trying on farm endeavors a producer can undertake. Our plentiful moisture, rolling topography, and climate make Kentucky ideal for producing high quality forage for either grazing or hay making. However, that same moisture, either in the form of rain or high humidity, can sometimes make it devilishly hard to make hay here in Kentucky.