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Human-Nonhuman Primate Interconnections And Their Relevance To Anthropology, Agustin Fuentes Nov 2006

Human-Nonhuman Primate Interconnections And Their Relevance To Anthropology, Agustin Fuentes

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

The human-nonhuman primate interface is a core component in conservation and an emerging area of discourse across anthropology. There is a growing recognition of the relevance of long-term sympatry between human and nonhuman primates. Until recently these relationships received limited attention in the anthropological literature and in the primatological construction of models for the behavior and evolution of primate societies. Most socioecological investigations into primate groups and human populations do not incorporate their interactions (beyond predation or crop raiding), potential pathogen sharing, or the role of the anthropogenically impacted environment. Current relationships between humans and nonhuman primates are generally assumed ...


Primate Sanctuaries, Taxonomy And Survival: A Case Study From South Africa, Paul Grobler, Magali Jacquier, Helene Denys, Mary Blair, Patricia L. Whitten, Trudy R. Turner Nov 2006

Primate Sanctuaries, Taxonomy And Survival: A Case Study From South Africa, Paul Grobler, Magali Jacquier, Helene Denys, Mary Blair, Patricia L. Whitten, Trudy R. Turner

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)


The relationship between humans and non-human primates in South Africa is problematic. On the one hand, vervet monkeys were formerly designated vermin species and could be destroyed at will. On the other hand, many people keep young vervets as pets even though this is illegal, and the animals are confiscated if discovered. Sanctuaries were established to accommodate large numbers of orphaned and confiscated animals. Owners of some of these sanctuaries attempt to establish normal troop structures in the hopes of releasing these animals back into the wild and relieving overcrowding. However, local farmers, fearing crop damage, resist this release. Nature ...


Human And Non-Human Primate Co-Existence In The Neotropics: A Preliminary View Of Some Agricultural Practices As A Complement For Primate Conservation, Alejandro Estrada Nov 2006

Human And Non-Human Primate Co-Existence In The Neotropics: A Preliminary View Of Some Agricultural Practices As A Complement For Primate Conservation, Alejandro Estrada

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

In this paper I address the general perception that agricultural activities are the principal threat to primate biodiversity in the tropics and argue that in Neotropical landscapes some agricultural practices may favor primate population persistence, and that this situation merits attention and investigation. To explore these issues, I examined three interrelated pressures upon tropical forests for the Mesoamerican and Amazon basin regions: human population growth trends, levels of poverty and human development and deforestation rates. I also present relevant results of recent surveys completed on the presence and activities of primate populations in agroecosystems in several landscapes in Mesoamerica. I ...


Coexistence And Exclusion Between Humans And Monkeys In Japan: Is Either Really Possible?, David S. Sprague, Nobusuke Iwasaki Nov 2006

Coexistence And Exclusion Between Humans And Monkeys In Japan: Is Either Really Possible?, David S. Sprague, Nobusuke Iwasaki

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

The Japanese people face a cultural and ecological challenge in seeking a new relationship between themselves and the Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata). Monkeys are a major agricultural pest. Monkey habitat often lies within a short distance from fields and villages, and vice versa, especially in mountainous areas. The idealized solution is a form of coexistence where humans and monkeys somehow negotiate a harmonious compromise. A word used often in Japanese is kyosei, to live in common, implying a more intimate relation than mere side-by-side coexistence. In practice, kyosei is a word used by policy makers or scholars, but less often ...


Human Dimensions Of Northern Muriqui Conservation Efforts, Karen B. Strier, Jean P. Boubli, Francisco B. Pontual, Sergio L. Mendes Nov 2006

Human Dimensions Of Northern Muriqui Conservation Efforts, Karen B. Strier, Jean P. Boubli, Francisco B. Pontual, Sergio L. Mendes

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

The northern muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is endemic to Brazil’s Atlantic Forest, and it ranks among the most critically endangered primates in the world. Roughly 25% of the species is found in the 957 ha forest at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga/RPPN-Feliciano Miguel Abdala, in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The long-term research and conservation efforts at this site have received considerable attention, and public awareness and educational campaigns about northern muriquis have been highly effective. Nonetheless, very little about the human dimensions of these efforts have been explicitly described. In this paper, we focus on three distinct, but interconnected dimensions ...


One Reserve, Three Primates: Applying A Holistic Approach To Understand The Interconnections Among Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur Catta), Verreaux's Sifaka (Propithecus Verreauxi), And Humans (Homo Sapiens) At Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, James E. Loudon, Michelle L. Sauther, Krista D. Fish, Mandala Hunter-Ishikawa, Youssouf Jacky Ibrahim Nov 2006

One Reserve, Three Primates: Applying A Holistic Approach To Understand The Interconnections Among Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur Catta), Verreaux's Sifaka (Propithecus Verreauxi), And Humans (Homo Sapiens) At Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, James E. Loudon, Michelle L. Sauther, Krista D. Fish, Mandala Hunter-Ishikawa, Youssouf Jacky Ibrahim

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)


We applied cultural anthropological, ethological, and parasitological methodologies to investigate the interplay among three primate species, ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), Verreaux’s sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi), and humans (Homo sapiens) who live within the same habitat (i.e. in sympatry) around the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. Through a fusion of these methodologies we hope to provide a holistic understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of human-nonhuman primate sympatry. Interviews and questionnaires provided us with initial insights regarding the local peoples' attitudes toward sympatric strepsirrhine primates. Origin myths indicate a close association between humans, ring-tailed lemurs, and Verreaux’s sifaka, which ...


Ethnoprimatology: Toward Reconciliation Of Biological And Cultural Anthropology, Erin P. Riley Nov 2006

Ethnoprimatology: Toward Reconciliation Of Biological And Cultural Anthropology, Erin P. Riley

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

One of the hallmarks of the discipline of anthropology is its holistic approach to the study of what it means to be human. A perennial challenge to the discipline, however, is the question of whether biological and cultural anthropology can truly coexist given their traditionally disparate epistemologies and methodologies. In this paper, I argue that the emerging field of ethnoprimatology, which focuses on the ecological and cultural interconnections between human and nonhuman primates, has real potential to bridge these two subfields. I support my argument by discussing the theoretical rationale of an ethnoprimatological approach with regard to the notion of ...


A Preliminary Review Of Neotropical Primates In The Subsistence And Symbolism Of Indigenous Lowland South American Peoples, Loretta Cormier Apr 2006

A Preliminary Review Of Neotropical Primates In The Subsistence And Symbolism Of Indigenous Lowland South American Peoples, Loretta Cormier

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

This article provides a review of selected literature of nonhuman primates in the subsistence and symbolism of indigenous lowland South American groups. While few works have focused specifically on the relationship between human and nonhuman primates in Amazonia and the surrounding areas, a number of ethnographic works do incorporate information about the roles of monkeys in varied groups. The section on subsistence focuses on the use of primates as food, including preferences, avoidances, and taboos. The section on symbolism focuses on the role of monkeys in myths, folklore, and in delineating the humanity/animality divide.


Review Of Conservation: Linking, Ecology, Economics, And Culture By Monique Borgerhoff Mulder And Peter Coppolillo, David Himmelfarb Jan 2006

Review Of Conservation: Linking, Ecology, Economics, And Culture By Monique Borgerhoff Mulder And Peter Coppolillo, David Himmelfarb

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

Guided by their extensive field experience in conservation research and practice, Monique Borgerhoff Mulder and Peter Coppolillo offer an encompassing introduction to some of the most pervasive and incendiary social and biological science debates concerning biodiversity conservation. As environmental conservation initiatives have expanded throughout the globe in recent decades, scholars primarily from the social sciences have begun to critically examine the often fraught social dynamics of such conservation. This body of work has ignited a series of fierce debates among those with a concern for local peoples who have found themselves marginalized by conservation, those with a concern for rapidly ...


A Message From The Editors, The Editors Jan 2006

A Message From The Editors, The Editors

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

The complex nature of ecological and environmental problems requires a multi-faceted approach to their understanding and solution. Ecological and environmental anthropology sounds interdisciplinary, but what exactly does that mean? And how does that differ from multidisciplinary? Numerous articles over the past 30 or so years have talked about this type of research and some researchers have braved the unknown to produce high-quality, interesting, and useful work. However, for various institutional reasons, true integration of methods and theories across disciplines remains difficult to achieve.


A Preliminary Review Of Neotropical Primates In The Subsistence And Symbolism Of Indigenous Lowland South American Peoples, Loretta Cormier Jan 2006

A Preliminary Review Of Neotropical Primates In The Subsistence And Symbolism Of Indigenous Lowland South American Peoples, Loretta Cormier

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

This article provides a review of selected literature of nonhuman primates in the subsistence and symbolism of indigenous lowland South American groups. While few works have focused specifically on the relationship between human and nonhuman primates in Amazonia and the surrounding areas, a number of ethnographic works do incorporate information about the roles of monkeys in varied groups. The section on subsistence focuses on the use of primates as food, including preferences, avoidances, and taboos. The section on symbolism focuses on the role of monkeys in myths, folklore, and in delineating the humanity/animality divide.


Review Of Last Child In The Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature Deficit Disorder By Richard Louv, Colleen Marie O'Brien Jan 2006

Review Of Last Child In The Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature Deficit Disorder By Richard Louv, Colleen Marie O'Brien

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

Like many other children growing up in the suburban United States during the 1970s, my childhood memories include swinging from tree limbs, tromping through the woods, and constructing tree forts in the far stretches of our neighborhood. But what happens when an entire generation of children grows up without such memories? Richard Louv, a New York Times journalist and founder of Connect for Kids, an internet-based child advocacy organization, explores this question in Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature Deficit Disorder. According to Louv, children today are more adept at naming cartoon characters than native species ...


The Importance Of Integrative Anthropology: A Preliminary Investigation Employing Primatological And Cultural Anthropological Data Collectionmethods In Assessing Human-Monkey Co-Existence In Bali, Indonesia, James E. Loudon, Michaela E. Howells, Agustin Fuentes Jan 2006

The Importance Of Integrative Anthropology: A Preliminary Investigation Employing Primatological And Cultural Anthropological Data Collectionmethods In Assessing Human-Monkey Co-Existence In Bali, Indonesia, James E. Loudon, Michaela E. Howells, Agustin Fuentes

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

This study investigates the interplay between humans (Homo sapiens) and long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) living in sympatric associations at 11 Hindu temple sites on the island of Bali, Indonesia. Primatological methods were utilized to examine demography, habitat type, and record long-tailed macaque feeding, and ranging behavior. Additionally, interviews and questionnaires were conducted to ascertain Balinese individuals’ perspectives regarding the macaques, local folklores surrounding the macaques, the perceived level of human-macaque overlap, and the degree of crop raiding by the macaques. Ethnographic methods revealed that attitudes toward long-tailed macaques vary, suggesting that human perceptions are determined by religious/local folklores and ...