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Extension Wildlife Programs: Thoughts And Ideas, Jeffrey J. Jackson Oct 2006

Extension Wildlife Programs: Thoughts And Ideas, Jeffrey J. Jackson

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The following commentary is a summary of some personal thoughts, reflections, and opinions on extension wildlife programming based on my experience at the University of Georgia as Extension Wildlife Specialist during the years between 1976 and 2001. I hope it will be of some value to new specialists. Because I was the only Extension Wildlife Specialist, I was in a unique position to develop an overview of the entire wildlife management field. Along the way, I had the opportunity to be full time within Extension, have a split appointment, and be assigned to an academic department.


An Internet Survey Of Private Pond Owners And Managers In Texas, Michael P. Masser, April E. Schonrock Oct 2006

An Internet Survey Of Private Pond Owners And Managers In Texas, Michael P. Masser, April E. Schonrock

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The primary emphasis of this survey was to determine what specific problems Texas private impoundment owners/managers confront, how widely these problems occur, and where owners/managers get their information on pond management. A secondary emphasis was to examine the potential utilization of the Internet to gather information and distributed outreach materials. A random sample of 2,999 private impoundment (i.e., no public waters) applicants for Triploid Grass Carp Permits from Texas Parks and Wildlife was utilized as the survey mailing list. A 49-question survey was developed and placed on a secure web site. Each questionnaire contained five sections ...


Breaking Through The Food Plot Mentality, Christopher E. Moorman, Craig A. Harper, Christopher Deperno Oct 2006

Breaking Through The Food Plot Mentality, Christopher E. Moorman, Craig A. Harper, Christopher Deperno

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Landowners and other wildlife enthusiasts often desire instant gratification when attempting to attract wildlife to their properties. Advertisements distributed by television programs, outdoor publications, and conservation organizations have played a large part in creating the desire for a quick and easy fix. Landowners are erroneously led to believe food plots or plantings of nonnative shrubs and trees will raise the carrying capacity for target wildlife species, even though the typical privately-held property contains overstocked, high-graded timber, intensively maintained croplands, mowed roadsides and drainage ditches, fire-suppressed woodlands, and pastures vegetated with non-native grasses that provide no cover and poor-quality forage. In ...


Panel Discussion: The Future Of Natural Resources Extension, Gary San Julian Moderator Oct 2006

Panel Discussion: The Future Of Natural Resources Extension, Gary San Julian Moderator

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Today we want to talk about the future of Extension. At the committee meeting, we talked about what the important things were, and a high priority that everyone is concerned about is going to happen in 2020: Where is Extension going to be, where is the fisheries and wildlife program going to be, where are we in the states going to be, and what kind of support are we going to get?


Approaches For Delivering Integrated Forestry And Wildlife Extension Programs: The Missouri Woodland Steward Short Course And Missouri Master Wildlifer Program, Robert A. Pierce Ii, H. E. Stelzer Oct 2006

Approaches For Delivering Integrated Forestry And Wildlife Extension Programs: The Missouri Woodland Steward Short Course And Missouri Master Wildlifer Program, Robert A. Pierce Ii, H. E. Stelzer

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Extension educational programs related to the stewardship of Missouri’s natural resources have been identified as a priority in the MU College of Agriculture Food and Natural Resource’s “Extension Base Program” (MU CAFNR 2001). Citizens own approximately 94% of the land in the state and therefore manage most of the natural resource base, including forests, agricultural lands, prairies and grasslands, wetlands, streams, and other natural habitats. Abundant natural resources, renewable and nonrenewable alike, provide for agriculture and timber production as well as recreational opportunities, each of which are directly or indirectly responsible for a majority of the economic activity ...


Coyotes Nipping At Our Heels: A New Suburban Dilemma, Robert M. Timm Oct 2006

Coyotes Nipping At Our Heels: A New Suburban Dilemma, Robert M. Timm

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

In the 1970s, coyote attacks on humans in urban and suburban environments began to occur, primarily in Southern California. Such attacks have increased in number, and since the late 1980s coyote attacks on people have been reported from at least 16 additional states and 4 Canadian provinces. Attack incidents are typically preceded by a sequence of increasingly bold coyote behaviors, including attacks on pets during daylight hours. In suburban areas, coyotes can habituate to humans as a result of plentiful food resources, including increased numbers of rabbits and rodents, household refuse, pet food, water from ponds and landscape irrigation run-off ...


Usda-Extension Wildlife And Fisheries Educational Programs 1978-2000, James E. Miller Oct 2006

Usda-Extension Wildlife And Fisheries Educational Programs 1978-2000, James E. Miller

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

This paper provides a brief overview of the history of USDA-Extension wildlife and fisheries programs at the national level, with emphasis on the years 1978-2000. Portions of the earlier history of Extension wildlife and fisheries programs at the national level can be found in previous proceedings of these National conferences and in other publications (see Miller 1981). This review of programs conducted or influenced by the National Program Leader (NPL) during the period is a brief snapshot in time regarding the presence of an experienced and motivated professional serving in the NPL wildlife and fisheries position.


The Value Of Teamwork, Jim Byford Oct 2006

The Value Of Teamwork, Jim Byford

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Wildlife and fisheries professionals are generally “loners.” Most often, we get into the profession because we love not only the outdoors, but also the solitude often associated with our job. And most universities perpetuate that by the way we’re educated – usually not as teams, but as individuals. Even when we occasionally have team projects, it’s easier to do it ourselves than to coordinate with the group. And the height of frustration is when some other team members don’t do their part.

But employers really like team players. They like not only people who can put a team ...


Realizing The Potential Of Family Forests: Tools To Facilitate Habitat Conservation, Drue Deberry, Julie H. Moore Oct 2006

Realizing The Potential Of Family Forests: Tools To Facilitate Habitat Conservation, Drue Deberry, Julie H. Moore

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The management of family-owned forests is discussed in light of conservation issues and development pressures. Safe Harbor Agreements and Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances are voluntary tools that can be used to protect conservation values, particularly habitat for threatened or endangered species. A case history of forest management practices to sustain the gopher tortoise in the Southeast is given.


Extension’S Role In Endangered Species Management, R. Dwayne Elmore Oct 2006

Extension’S Role In Endangered Species Management, R. Dwayne Elmore

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Cooperative Extension is an ideal facilitator for volatile wildlife issues such as endangered species management on private lands. Often, lack of trust in government agencies or fear of Endangered Species Act regulations hinders conservation efforts on these private lands. Extension personnel have close ties to local affected communities and thus can be instrumental in educating landowners regarding options that may be available to them in regards to sensitive, candidate, threatened, or endangered species. While in the past these species have been regarded as liabilities to landowners, in many cases they can actually be assets. However, state and federal agencies are ...


First-Stop Planning And Communication For Landhelp, Delwin E. Benson Oct 2006

First-Stop Planning And Communication For Landhelp, Delwin E. Benson

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

I developed an Internet-based, planning and communication system for professional and private users to make plans for their lands, which is branded as LandHelp (www.LandHelp.info). The project was funded by grants from the Renewable Resources Extension Act, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Wildlife Habitat Management Institute, Colorado State Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (USDA SARE) from the Western Region, and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agro-forestry program with the NRCS. Currently, LandHelp contains links to 31 broad categories of information that then link to 2,613 more resources. Major ...


One Way To Handle A Split Appointment, Peter T. Bromley Oct 2006

One Way To Handle A Split Appointment, Peter T. Bromley

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Wildlife and fisheries extension specialists typically hold split appointments. Identification of significant natural resource problems or opportunities and integration of research and teaching methods with extension programming can produce results that simultaneously satisfy extension program expectations as well as meet desired evidence for university-level scholarship. The wildlife-agriculture applied research and extension program, with emphasis on restoration of northern bobwhite quail populations on intensely farmed lands, illustrates the benefits of an integrated approach.


Growing Quality Stewardship For Natural Resources In Tennessee, Aubrey L. Deck, Craig Harper Oct 2006

Growing Quality Stewardship For Natural Resources In Tennessee, Aubrey L. Deck, Craig Harper

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

A primary goal of Extension Wildlife in Tennessee is to steer youth in a direction that will increase their chance of successful recruitment into society and make a positive difference in the way the public views and manages our natural resources. Tennessee’s 4-H Wildlife Project is in its 35th year of growing quality stewardship by 1) teaching the basic principles of wildlife ecology and management, 2) helping students understand the importance of wildlife in our environment, and 3) promoting citizenship/leadership. These efforts may lead to informed participation in natural resource conservation and land-use decision making.

The University of ...


Bringing Extension Into The Classroom, Christopher Deperno, Christopher E. Moorman Oct 2006

Bringing Extension Into The Classroom, Christopher Deperno, Christopher E. Moorman

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The dissemination of research-based information has been a hallmark of North Carolina State University’s (NCSU) land grant mission for more than 100 years. Through county Cooperative Extension Centers, NCSU maintains a strong relationship with the citizens of North Carolina. However, many students do not understand the importance of the mission of a land grant university, and most do not know that North Carolina State University has an extension program. Furthermore, students do not understand the extension mission, administrative structure, or approach to educate the public. There are many ways to bring extension into the undergraduate classroom and to encourage ...


Extension: A Modern Day Pony Express?, David Drake, Ben West Oct 2006

Extension: A Modern Day Pony Express?, David Drake, Ben West

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The Smith-Lever Act of 1914 established the Cooperative Extension Service for the purpose of “diffusing among the people of the United States useful and practical information on subjects relating to agriculture, home economics, and rural energy”. Since then, much has changed. Just over 92 million individuals lived in the United States in 1910, with 31% of the population employed as farmers. As of 2005, America’s population had increased to nearly 297 million people, with only 3% of the population earning a living on the farm. More telling, about 80% of America’s population now lives in a suburban/urban ...


Qualifying Native Warm-Season Grasses And Early Succession Habitat, Craig A. Harper, Christopher E. Moorman Oct 2006

Qualifying Native Warm-Season Grasses And Early Succession Habitat, Craig A. Harper, Christopher E. Moorman

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Tall fescue and other non-native perennial cool-season grasses (such as orchardgrass, timothy, bromegrasses, and bluegrass) provide poor wildlife habitat. Native warm-season grasses (nwsg), especially big and little bluestem, indiangrass, and switchgrass, have been promoted to replace non-native cool-season grasses and enhance quality early succession habitat. Initially, problems associated with establishing nwsg and landowner misperceptions slowed the progress of early succession habitat enhancement on private lands. More recently, improvements in planting equipment, herbicides, and seed quality have increased establishment success. Wildlife response to native grass plantings generally has been positive, especially when an abundance of wildlife-friendly forbs and scattered shrubs occur ...


Bass Management Symposia: Managing Ponds And Lakes For Better Fishing, Billy Higginbotham, Michael Masser, Peter Wood Oct 2006

Bass Management Symposia: Managing Ponds And Lakes For Better Fishing, Billy Higginbotham, Michael Masser, Peter Wood

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Texas contains more than one million privately owned ponds and reservoirs comprising some one-half million surface acres. Interest in managing these ponds for recreational fishing, especially for largemouth bass is high. In order to respond to this educational need, a series of symposia designed to provide information on intensive largemouth bass management was conducted. Symposia were conducted in Athens (2001), San Marcos (2003), and Conroe (2005). The fee-based programs ($50 pre-registration, $75 at the door) attracted 601 participants from Texas and several other states. Each participant received a copy of the symposia proceedings. Exhibitors providing private water management products and ...


With One Stroke Of The Pen: How Can Wildlife Extension Specialists Involve Developers And Policy-Makers In Wildlife Conservation?, Mark Hostetler Oct 2006

With One Stroke Of The Pen: How Can Wildlife Extension Specialists Involve Developers And Policy-Makers In Wildlife Conservation?, Mark Hostetler

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Residential developments have a huge impact on natural resources and wildlife, and sustainable or “green” communities are beginning to be built throughout the United States with goals to conserve wildlife habitat, to create healthy lifestyles, and to promote a sense of community. Buzzwords can be heard in the media and in town meetings: sustainability, smart growth, new urbanism, low impact development, and conservation subdivisions. Ultimately, with one stroke of a pen, developers and policymakers can determine how a community will look and feel for many years to come. Plus, citizens make day-to-day decisions that determine whether a community operates as ...


Extension: A New Opportunity For On-Line, Issue-Based Programming, Paul D. Curtis, Robert H. Schmidt, Greg K. Yarrow, Raj Smith, Stephen Vantassel Oct 2006

Extension: A New Opportunity For On-Line, Issue-Based Programming, Paul D. Curtis, Robert H. Schmidt, Greg K. Yarrow, Raj Smith, Stephen Vantassel

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Individuals and groups interested in educating the public about human-wildlife interactions should consider joining one of the various working groups (Communities of Practice) involved with eXtension. eXtension is a national Extension program designed to unify Extension’s presence on the Internet. eXtension provides collaborative tools for the development and management of content that can be published on the world wide web. Experts can participate in several ways, including answering visitor questions, submitting content (including text, images, and video), and reviewing content. Currently, of the 21 identified Communities of Practice, only one, Wildlife Damage Management, is focused on fisheries and wildlife ...


Protecting And Enhancing River And Stream Continuity, Scott Jackson Oct 2006

Protecting And Enhancing River And Stream Continuity, Scott Jackson

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

As long linear ecosystems, rivers and streams are particularly vulnerable to fragmentation. There is growing concern about the role of road crossings – and especially culverts – in altering habitats and disrupting river and stream continuity. The River and Stream Continuity Project began in the year 2000 with a startup grant from the Massachusetts Watershed Initiative. The University of Massachusetts took the lead in convening a group of people from a variety of agencies and organizations who were concerned about the impact of road-stream crossings on fish and other aquatic organism passage. Since its beginning, the River and Stream Continuity Project has ...


Take Action! The Past, Present, And Future Of Sage-Grouse Conservation In Utah, Sarah G. Lupis, Terry A. Messmer, Todd A. Black, S. Nicole Frey, Dean Mitchell, Joan Degiorgio Oct 2006

Take Action! The Past, Present, And Future Of Sage-Grouse Conservation In Utah, Sarah G. Lupis, Terry A. Messmer, Todd A. Black, S. Nicole Frey, Dean Mitchell, Joan Degiorgio

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Utah has a 10-year history of local conservation planning for sage-grouse populations. The San Juan County Gunnison Sage-Grouse Local Working Group (SWOG) was formed in 1996 and completed a local conservation plan in 2000; the Parker Mountain Adaptive Resource Management Local Working Group (PARM) was established in 1998 and has been a model for sagegrouse conservation planning throughout the state. In July 2006, most of Utah’s 12 adaptive resource management local working groups completed local conservation plans for sage-grouse that address the unique issues affecting their respective areas. Each local working group is made up of diverse stakeholders including ...


The Florida Master Naturalist Program: Creating, Implementing, And Evaluating A Successful Statewide Conservation Education Program, Martin B. Main Oct 2006

The Florida Master Naturalist Program: Creating, Implementing, And Evaluating A Successful Statewide Conservation Education Program, Martin B. Main

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The Florida Master Naturalist Program is an educational program with a well-developed curriculum that encourages but does not require volunteer service. Its history, development, administration, curriculum, and target audiences are described. It presently consists of three modules: Freshwater Wetlands, Coastal Systems, and Upland Habitats. Considerations regarding program training, how instructors are recruited and selected, and how program impacts are evaluated are summarized.


A Web-Based Outreach Tool For Aquatic Vegetation Management, Michael P. Masser Oct 2006

A Web-Based Outreach Tool For Aquatic Vegetation Management, Michael P. Masser

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Most private impoundments have multiple uses for either livestock watering, irrigation, aquaculture, and/or recreation. Infestations of aquatic vegetation can have negative impacts on these multiple uses by 1) hindering feeding and harvesting operations, 2) reducing recreational access, 3) clogging irrigation systems, 4) increasing evaporation rates by as much as 30%, 5) increasing eutrophication rates by 2- to 3-fold, 6) negatively impacting water quality for fish and wildlife species, 7) shifting the balance of the fish population (e.g., stunting), and 8) increasing breeding areas for mosquitoes and other insect pests. Many of the most noxious aquatic plants are non-indigenous ...


Sage-Grouse Restoration Project: Evaluating The Effects Of The Farm Bill Conservation Practices On Sage-Grouse, Terry A. Messmer Oct 2006

Sage-Grouse Restoration Project: Evaluating The Effects Of The Farm Bill Conservation Practices On Sage-Grouse, Terry A. Messmer

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The Office of Management and Budget is demanding increased accountability of funds used to implement conservation practices and strategies. Although current Farm Bill policy provides priority funding for projects that are designed to enhance species conservation, it does not allocate funds to conduct the evaluations needed to document the effect of conservation practices on wildlife. The Sage-Grouse Restoration Project (SGRP) is a cooperative agreement with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), designed specifically to facilitate evaluations to determine the effect of conservation practices and technologies implemented under the 2002 Farm Bill on restoring or enhancing sage-grouse habitat on private lands ...


The “We Know, We Believe, And We Feel” Approach To Implementing Projects Under The Farm Bill To Benefit Sage-Grouse, Terry A. Messmer Oct 2006

The “We Know, We Believe, And We Feel” Approach To Implementing Projects Under The Farm Bill To Benefit Sage-Grouse, Terry A. Messmer

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Sage-grouse occupy less than 8% of their historic range. To address these declines, the western states and provinces have implemented sage-grouse management plans. These plans identified the need for local working groups (LWGs) to develop and implement conservation plans to address high priority issues. To facilitate LWGs in Utah, the Division of Wildlife Resources entered into a cooperative agreement with Utah State University Extension in 2001 to develop a Utah Community-Based Conservation (CBCP) program. Because sage-grouse occupy diverse landscapes each exhibiting different land ownership patterns, each of the sage-grouse management areas are somewhat unique. Thus, we believe the success of ...


Saving The World One Native Plant At A Time, Christopher E. Moorman, Christopher S. Deperno Oct 2006

Saving The World One Native Plant At A Time, Christopher E. Moorman, Christopher S. Deperno

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Wildlife habitat is lost as the human population and land clearing for development increase in the South. Remaining habitats are fragmented and contain high numbers of invasive, exotic plants. Suburban, manicured landscapes often lack the plant diversity and complex vegetation structure important to wildlife. Generally, developers and homeowners replant cleared grounds with exotic plants that don’t provide quality wildlife habitat. Instead, individual home or property owners can mitigate wildlife habitat loss in urban areas by landscaping with native plants following proper design principles. Furthermore, many people taking action over a large area (e.g., across a neighborhood) will help ...


Best Management Practices For Aquatic Vegetation Management In Lakes, Joseph E. Morris, Richard D. Clayton Oct 2006

Best Management Practices For Aquatic Vegetation Management In Lakes, Joseph E. Morris, Richard D. Clayton

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Aquatic plants are an important component of well functioning lake ecosystems. Plant abundance is influenced by sediments, nutrients and water clarity. Given the dominance of agriculture in Iowa, nutrients and soil lost from “leaky” watersheds combine to create ideal habitat for growth of aquatic plants in lakes and ponds and hasten eutrophication. Under these conditions, plant growth can become a nuisance and reduce recreation, especially shoreline angling and boating. These nuisance growths present special problems to lake managers and those interested in lake-based recreation. Given the complexity of the aquatic vegetation often found in lakes, there is no one long-term ...


The Above-Ground Movement And Dispersal Of The Plains Pocket Gopher (Geomys Bursarius), Craig Panich Oct 2006

The Above-Ground Movement And Dispersal Of The Plains Pocket Gopher (Geomys Bursarius), Craig Panich

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The Plains pocket gopher has the largest range of its genus, and it is the gopher that inhabits much of Wisconsin. Gophers are fossorial herbivores that have a dramatic impact on natural and agricultural ecosystems. Throughout the summer of 2005, I completed a population analysis of the plains pocket gopher in a variety of habitats in Buffalo and Trempealeau Counties, Wisconsin, that provided valuable insight into the complex population dynamics of the gopher and served as a foundation to this project. Pocket gophers are known to be strictly subterranean; however, it is not uncommon to find their remains inside the ...


The Center For Human-Wildlife Conflict Resolution At Virginia Tech: A Model Of Future Use, James A. Parkhurst Oct 2006

The Center For Human-Wildlife Conflict Resolution At Virginia Tech: A Model Of Future Use, James A. Parkhurst

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The Center for Human-Wildlife Conflict Resolution, located at Virginia Tech, was created in mid-2004 to bring together representatives of state and federal agencies, private sector practitioners, non-governmental organizations, researchers, educators, and other stakeholders common to most human-wildlife conflicts as a means to facilitate and expedite the process of attaining realistic and publicly acceptable solutions to human-wildlife conflicts. The Center has four critical missions: coordination, information transfer, research, and training. Participating partners (i.e., members) in the Center adopted upon an Advisory Board organizational model and operate under a “majority rule” protocol. Increased awareness and understanding of the missions, regulatory mandates ...


Integrating Northern Bobwhite And Grassland Bird Habitat Enhancement Practices On University Of Missouri Agriculture Experiment Stations: An Educational Model That Puts Knowledge Into Action Through Use Of Demonstrations, Tim Reinbott, Robert A. Pierce Ii, Bill White, Brad Jacobs, Nadia Navarrete-Tindall Oct 2006

Integrating Northern Bobwhite And Grassland Bird Habitat Enhancement Practices On University Of Missouri Agriculture Experiment Stations: An Educational Model That Puts Knowledge Into Action Through Use Of Demonstrations, Tim Reinbott, Robert A. Pierce Ii, Bill White, Brad Jacobs, Nadia Navarrete-Tindall

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Over the past 50 years, advances in agricultural production negatively influenced habitats for bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) and grassland bird species. Farming systems, once beneficial for bobwhite, greater prairie chicken (Tympanuchus cupido), Henslow’s sparrow (Ammodramus henslowii), eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), and many other wildlife species, provided a diversity of early successional habitats. With increases in farm size, intensive cultivation, chemical weed and insect pest control and more efficient harvest practices, many producers have been able to stay in business, but quality habitats for many species have been reduced.