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2006

Environmental Sciences

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

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Fate Of Fish Production In A Seasonally Flooded Saltmarsh, Philip W. Stevens, Clay L. Montague, Kenneth J. Sulak Dec 2006

Fate Of Fish Production In A Seasonally Flooded Saltmarsh, Philip W. Stevens, Clay L. Montague, Kenneth J. Sulak

USGS Staff -- Published Research

Although saltmarshes are thought to enhance the productivity of open estuarine water, the mechanism by which energy transfer occurs has been debated for decades. One possible mechanism is the transfer of saltmarsh production to estuarine waters by vagile fishes and invertebrates. Monthly estimates of fish standing stock, net fish ingress, and predation were used to develop a bio-mass budget to estimates annual production of fishes and the relative yield to predatory fish, birds, and direct migration to the estuary. Annual production of saltmarsh fishes was estimated to 31.0 gm-2 saltmarsh, which falls within the range of previously reported ...


Collisions Of Red-Tailed Hawks (Buteo Jamaicensis), Turkey Vultures (Cathartes Aura), And Black Vultures (Coragyps Atratus) With Aircraft: Implications For Bird Strike Reduction, Bradley F. Blackwell, Sandra E. Wright Dec 2006

Collisions Of Red-Tailed Hawks (Buteo Jamaicensis), Turkey Vultures (Cathartes Aura), And Black Vultures (Coragyps Atratus) With Aircraft: Implications For Bird Strike Reduction, Bradley F. Blackwell, Sandra E. Wright

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

From 1990 through 2003, 52,493 wildlife collisions with aircraft were reported to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA); 97% of these incidents involved birds. The approximate cost to the civil aviation industry in the U.S.A. due to collisions of birds with aircraft (hereafter referred to as bird strikes) was $163.51 million in direct monetary losses and associated costs for the 14 year period (Cleary et al. 2004). Strikes with raptors (Falconidae and Accipitridae; including vultures, Cathartidae)accounted for approximately 28% of reported aircraft down time resulting from known-species bird strikes (known species =182942 hr; total ...


Nesting Success Of Grassland And Savanna Birds On Reclaimed Surface Coal Mines Of The Midwestern United States, Edward W. Galligan, Travis L. Devault, Steven L. Lima Dec 2006

Nesting Success Of Grassland And Savanna Birds On Reclaimed Surface Coal Mines Of The Midwestern United States, Edward W. Galligan, Travis L. Devault, Steven L. Lima

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Reclaimed surface coal mines in southwestern Indiana support many grassland and shrub/ savanna bird species of conservation concern. We examined the nesting success of birds on these reclaimed mines to assess whether such ‘‘unnatural’’ places represent productive breeding habitats for such species. We established eight study sites on two large, grassland-dominated mines in southwestern Indiana and classified them into three categories (open grassland, shrub/savanna, and a mixture of grassland and shrub/savanna) based on broad vegetation and landscape characteristics. During the 1999 and 2000 breeding seasons, we found and monitored 911 nests of 31 species. Daily nest survival for ...


Raccoon Predation As A Potential Limiting Factor In The Success Of The Green Iguana In Southern Florida, Henry T. Smith, Walter E. Meshaka Jr., Richard M. Engeman, Steven M. Crossett, Mark E. Foley, Gary Bush Dec 2006

Raccoon Predation As A Potential Limiting Factor In The Success Of The Green Iguana In Southern Florida, Henry T. Smith, Walter E. Meshaka Jr., Richard M. Engeman, Steven M. Crossett, Mark E. Foley, Gary Bush

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

The Green Iguana, Iguana iguana, is a well established, large-bodied, exotic species in Florida (Meshaka et al. 2004a. The Exotic Amphibians and Reptiles of Florida, Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, Florida. 155 pp.; Meshaka et al. 2004b. Iguana 11:154-161). Limiting factors of populations and causes of Green Iguana mortality in Florida are poorly understood and the only documented predators are the domestic dog (Canus familiaris) (Meshaka et al. 2004a), Yellow-crowned Night-heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (Engeman et al. 2005. Herpetol. Rev. 36:320), Florida Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia floridana) (McKie et al. 2005. Florida Field Nat. 33:125-127), and an unidentified species ...


A Long-Term Perspective On Drought In The Great Plains And West, Sherilyn C. Fritz Nov 2006

A Long-Term Perspective On Drought In The Great Plains And West, Sherilyn C. Fritz

Faculty Publications from The Water Center

Management of water resources requires an understanding of the full range of natural variability and its consequences. The weather record, which spans the last 100 years or so, provides a snapshot of the contemporary history of drought and its impacts, but this record is relatively short and is inadequate for understanding long-term trends or for evaluating the magnitude of human impacts. A variety of so-called paleoclimatic records - such as tree rings, lake sediments, and sand dunes - record the history of the environment and can be used to extend the record of climatic variation to older intervals of time. These historical ...


Instream Flow Legislation, Sandi Zellmer Nov 2006

Instream Flow Legislation, Sandi Zellmer

Faculty Publications from The Water Center

In the west, state law historically considered water left in the stream to be wasted. Western states, which rely heavily on diversions to meet their water needs, have encouraged full appropriation of rivers and streams. In many cases, however, diversions have resulted in the depletion of stream flow reliant ecosystems and adversely affected fish, wildlife, recreation and river navigation.

A comparison of Nebraska law to the water law of other western states demonstrates that Nebraska’s existing instream flow legislation is quite narrow. Nebraska statutes impose a variety of restrictions on instream flow appropriations, many of which are unique and ...


The Public Interest Test For Water Appropriations, Sandi Zellmer Nov 2006

The Public Interest Test For Water Appropriations, Sandi Zellmer

Faculty Publications from The Water Center

Nebraska, like most states, imposes a “public interest” review on applications for water appropriations, changes and transfers. However, Nebraska statutes do not provide any specific public interest criteria for use in evaluating applications for new water appropriations or intra-basin transfers. Under Neb. Rev. Stat. § 46-234, an application for a water appropriation may be refused when denial is demanded by the public interest. The director of the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has the duty of determining whether the public interest demands the denial of a water appropriation, but is given no express statutory criteria to provide assistance in making that ...


The Republican, The Platte And Pumpkin Creek: Current Nebraska Water Policy Issues, J. David Aiken Nov 2006

The Republican, The Platte And Pumpkin Creek: Current Nebraska Water Policy Issues, J. David Aiken

Faculty Publications from The Water Center

Potential conflicts between surface water users and ground water users are posing perplexing challenges to Nebraska policy makers. Surface water law is the rule of priority, "first in time is first in right," as administered by the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Ground water is primarily the rule of correlative rights, as administered by local natural resources districts (NRDs). Traditionally ground water irrigators have been subject to few restrictions on drilling new wells or how much water could be used (except in the Upper Republican NRD in southwest Nebraska). Now the DNR can ban new wells in overappropriated and ...


Water As Property, Sandi Zellmer Nov 2006

Water As Property, Sandi Zellmer

Faculty Publications from The Water Center

The issue of whether water is or should be characterized as property under the law raises considerable controversy. In the western United States, water is typically viewed as a form of property, while in the east it is not. Whether water should be treated as property has been the subject of an extensive body of scholarship. Proponents argue that establishing legally protected, secure private property rights encourages maximum utilization of resources. Also, exclusivity and surety of possession can foster wise investment of labor and stewardship. Conversely, the absence of legally protected interests in property ownership can result in a “tragedy ...


Using Baits To Deliver Pharmaceuticals To Feral Swine In Southern Texas, Tyler A. Campbell, Steven J. Lapidge, David B. Long Nov 2006

Using Baits To Deliver Pharmaceuticals To Feral Swine In Southern Texas, Tyler A. Campbell, Steven J. Lapidge, David B. Long

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Few studies have evaluated oral delivery systems of pharmaceuticals (e.g., vaccines, fertility control agents, and toxicants) to feral swine (Sus scrofa) in the United States. Our objective was to assess, through a field trial, the percentage of feral swine and non-target animals that remove and consume baits intended to transport pharmaceuticals to feral swine in southern Texas, USA. We hand-placed 1,178 iophenoxic acid (IA)–marked baits distributed over 1,721 ha (68 baits/km2) in April 2005 and monitored species-specific bait removal and consumption using track stations, automated camera systems, and serum IA values from captured animals ...


The Biology Of Introduced Norway Rats On Kiska Island, Alaska, And An Evaluation Of An Eradication Approach, Gary W. Witmer, Patrick Burke, Susan Jojola, Peter Dunlevy Nov 2006

The Biology Of Introduced Norway Rats On Kiska Island, Alaska, And An Evaluation Of An Eradication Approach, Gary W. Witmer, Patrick Burke, Susan Jojola, Peter Dunlevy

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Introduced, invasive rats can cause substantial damage to native flora and fauna, including ground-nesting seabirds, when they become established on islands. We tested a control method for introduced Norway rats on Kiska Island, Alaska, during April-May, 2004, by hand-broadcasting rodenticide pellets (0.005% diaphacinone) over a 4-ha area at the rate of 28 kg/ha. We also gathered data on aspects of rat ecology and distribution, although rats were difficult to detect and capture. The rodenticide bait pellets seemed to have been effective in reducing the Norway rat population, however, this is based on a limited observation of rat sign ...


Human-Nonhuman Primate Interconnections And Their Relevance To Anthropology, Agustin Fuentes Nov 2006

Human-Nonhuman Primate Interconnections And Their Relevance To Anthropology, Agustin Fuentes

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

The human-nonhuman primate interface is a core component in conservation and an emerging area of discourse across anthropology. There is a growing recognition of the relevance of long-term sympatry between human and nonhuman primates. Until recently these relationships received limited attention in the anthropological literature and in the primatological construction of models for the behavior and evolution of primate societies. Most socioecological investigations into primate groups and human populations do not incorporate their interactions (beyond predation or crop raiding), potential pathogen sharing, or the role of the anthropogenically impacted environment. Current relationships between humans and nonhuman primates are generally assumed ...


Primate Sanctuaries, Taxonomy And Survival: A Case Study From South Africa, Paul Grobler, Magali Jacquier, Helene Denys, Mary Blair, Patricia L. Whitten, Trudy R. Turner Nov 2006

Primate Sanctuaries, Taxonomy And Survival: A Case Study From South Africa, Paul Grobler, Magali Jacquier, Helene Denys, Mary Blair, Patricia L. Whitten, Trudy R. Turner

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)


The relationship between humans and non-human primates in South Africa is problematic. On the one hand, vervet monkeys were formerly designated vermin species and could be destroyed at will. On the other hand, many people keep young vervets as pets even though this is illegal, and the animals are confiscated if discovered. Sanctuaries were established to accommodate large numbers of orphaned and confiscated animals. Owners of some of these sanctuaries attempt to establish normal troop structures in the hopes of releasing these animals back into the wild and relieving overcrowding. However, local farmers, fearing crop damage, resist this release. Nature ...


Human And Non-Human Primate Co-Existence In The Neotropics: A Preliminary View Of Some Agricultural Practices As A Complement For Primate Conservation, Alejandro Estrada Nov 2006

Human And Non-Human Primate Co-Existence In The Neotropics: A Preliminary View Of Some Agricultural Practices As A Complement For Primate Conservation, Alejandro Estrada

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

In this paper I address the general perception that agricultural activities are the principal threat to primate biodiversity in the tropics and argue that in Neotropical landscapes some agricultural practices may favor primate population persistence, and that this situation merits attention and investigation. To explore these issues, I examined three interrelated pressures upon tropical forests for the Mesoamerican and Amazon basin regions: human population growth trends, levels of poverty and human development and deforestation rates. I also present relevant results of recent surveys completed on the presence and activities of primate populations in agroecosystems in several landscapes in Mesoamerica. I ...


Coexistence And Exclusion Between Humans And Monkeys In Japan: Is Either Really Possible?, David S. Sprague, Nobusuke Iwasaki Nov 2006

Coexistence And Exclusion Between Humans And Monkeys In Japan: Is Either Really Possible?, David S. Sprague, Nobusuke Iwasaki

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

The Japanese people face a cultural and ecological challenge in seeking a new relationship between themselves and the Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata). Monkeys are a major agricultural pest. Monkey habitat often lies within a short distance from fields and villages, and vice versa, especially in mountainous areas. The idealized solution is a form of coexistence where humans and monkeys somehow negotiate a harmonious compromise. A word used often in Japanese is kyosei, to live in common, implying a more intimate relation than mere side-by-side coexistence. In practice, kyosei is a word used by policy makers or scholars, but less often ...


Human Dimensions Of Northern Muriqui Conservation Efforts, Karen B. Strier, Jean P. Boubli, Francisco B. Pontual, Sergio L. Mendes Nov 2006

Human Dimensions Of Northern Muriqui Conservation Efforts, Karen B. Strier, Jean P. Boubli, Francisco B. Pontual, Sergio L. Mendes

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

The northern muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) is endemic to Brazil’s Atlantic Forest, and it ranks among the most critically endangered primates in the world. Roughly 25% of the species is found in the 957 ha forest at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga/RPPN-Feliciano Miguel Abdala, in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The long-term research and conservation efforts at this site have received considerable attention, and public awareness and educational campaigns about northern muriquis have been highly effective. Nonetheless, very little about the human dimensions of these efforts have been explicitly described. In this paper, we focus on three distinct, but interconnected dimensions ...


One Reserve, Three Primates: Applying A Holistic Approach To Understand The Interconnections Among Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur Catta), Verreaux's Sifaka (Propithecus Verreauxi), And Humans (Homo Sapiens) At Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, James E. Loudon, Michelle L. Sauther, Krista D. Fish, Mandala Hunter-Ishikawa, Youssouf Jacky Ibrahim Nov 2006

One Reserve, Three Primates: Applying A Holistic Approach To Understand The Interconnections Among Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur Catta), Verreaux's Sifaka (Propithecus Verreauxi), And Humans (Homo Sapiens) At Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, James E. Loudon, Michelle L. Sauther, Krista D. Fish, Mandala Hunter-Ishikawa, Youssouf Jacky Ibrahim

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)


We applied cultural anthropological, ethological, and parasitological methodologies to investigate the interplay among three primate species, ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), Verreaux’s sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi), and humans (Homo sapiens) who live within the same habitat (i.e. in sympatry) around the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar. Through a fusion of these methodologies we hope to provide a holistic understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of human-nonhuman primate sympatry. Interviews and questionnaires provided us with initial insights regarding the local peoples' attitudes toward sympatric strepsirrhine primates. Origin myths indicate a close association between humans, ring-tailed lemurs, and Verreaux’s sifaka, which ...


Ethnoprimatology: Toward Reconciliation Of Biological And Cultural Anthropology, Erin P. Riley Nov 2006

Ethnoprimatology: Toward Reconciliation Of Biological And Cultural Anthropology, Erin P. Riley

Ecological and Environmental Anthropology (University of Georgia)

One of the hallmarks of the discipline of anthropology is its holistic approach to the study of what it means to be human. A perennial challenge to the discipline, however, is the question of whether biological and cultural anthropology can truly coexist given their traditionally disparate epistemologies and methodologies. In this paper, I argue that the emerging field of ethnoprimatology, which focuses on the ecological and cultural interconnections between human and nonhuman primates, has real potential to bridge these two subfields. I support my argument by discussing the theoretical rationale of an ethnoprimatological approach with regard to the notion of ...


Bird And Other Wildlife Hazards At Airports: Liability Issues For Airport Managers, Richard A. Dolbeer Nov 2006

Bird And Other Wildlife Hazards At Airports: Liability Issues For Airport Managers, Richard A. Dolbeer

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Aircraft collisions with birds (bird strikes) and other wildlife are a serious economic and safety problem. The problem has increased in the past decade because of expanding populations of many wildlife species that are hazardous to aviation (Dolbeer and Eschenfelder 2002). Cleary et al. (2004) estimated wildlife strikes (98% involving birds) cost the civil aviation industry in the USA about $500 million/year, 1990-2003. Allan and Orosz (2001) estimated that bird strikes annually cost commercial air carriers over $1.2 billion worldwide, 1999-2000. At least 194 people died and 164 aircraft were destroyed as a result of bird and other ...


Refuge Update – November/December 2006, Volume 3, Number 6 Nov 2006

Refuge Update – November/December 2006, Volume 3, Number 6

RefugeUpdate (USFWS-NWRS)

Table of Contents:

Least Bell’s Vireos Are Back, page 3 San Joaquin River National Wildlife Refuge hosted totally unexpected residents last year.

Managing Ocean Wildlife, page 5 A new agreement should help in managing marine resources.

Focus on . . . Endangered Species, pages 10-21 Whether it’s the fastest land mammal or the tiniest mussel, refuges work on behalf of endangered species.

Peeping at Peeps, page 24 Shorebirds can be tough to identify. Classroom and fields trips helped.


Wmi Outdoor News Bulletin * November 2006, Volume 60, No. 10 Nov 2006

Wmi Outdoor News Bulletin * November 2006, Volume 60, No. 10

Wildlife Management Institute Outdoor News Bulletin

Contents:

• North American Bird Species Shown to be Susceptible to Avian Influenza

• Longleaf pine restoration gets huge boost from Conservation Reserve Program

• Controversy still stalking elk feedgrounds in Wyoming

• Predator/prey workshop to be held at North American Conference

• New book gets rave notice

• With dove vote, Michiganders shoot science-based wildlife management in the foot

• Geothermal energy issue still boiling at the Valles Caldera National Preserve

• 72nd North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference registration

• Northeast states get positively proactive on State Wildlife Actions Plans

• Nominations sought for 2007 northern bobwhite quail awards

• Worth reading: A Writer’s Voice: Collected ...


Gray Wolf Biology Questions And Answers Nov 2006

Gray Wolf Biology Questions And Answers

Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Annual Reports

1) Why was the gray wolf listed as endangered?
2) What types of habitat do wolves use?
3) Do wolves need wilderness areas to survive? Can they survive near urban areas?
4) How far do wolves travel?
5) What do wolves eat?
6) If wolf numbers get too high will deer and elk be eliminated?
7) How do wolves in an area affect deer hunting?
8) Do wolves really take the old, young, sick, starving, or injured animals?
9) Do wolves kill more than they can eat?
10) Does the presence of wolves affect the numbers of animals other than ...


Status Of The Common Snook (Centropomus Undecimalis) In Texas, Kevin L. Pope, David R. Blankinship, Mark Fisher, Reynaldo Patiño Nov 2006

Status Of The Common Snook (Centropomus Undecimalis) In Texas, Kevin L. Pope, David R. Blankinship, Mark Fisher, Reynaldo Patiño

Nebraska Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit -- Staff Publications

Catch data are summarized for common snook (Centropomus undecimalis) from 1975 through 2004 from the lower Laguna Madre, the only area along the Texas coast where common snook are routinely captured. Catch rates of common snook were low < 1 common snook per gill net set) and varied among years, as did size structure. Based on the catch rate and size structure data, the adult common snook population is characterized by low abundance and erratic recruitment (i.e., missing or extremely weak year-classes are common). Additional comments on the status of common snook in Texas are provided.


Assistance With Wildlife Damage Problems In Nebraska, Scott E. Hygnstrom, John M. Hobbs, James G. Bruner, James Weverka, Dallas R. Virchow, Dennis M. Ferraro Oct 2006

Assistance With Wildlife Damage Problems In Nebraska, Scott E. Hygnstrom, John M. Hobbs, James G. Bruner, James Weverka, Dallas R. Virchow, Dennis M. Ferraro

Papers in Natural Resources

Nebraskans who experience damage and nuisance problems with wildlife can get assistance from several public and private organizations. This NebFact describes the most direct route to the solution of your problem. A reference guide (Table I) lists who to contact for information, materials, permits, and hands-on assistance. Wildlife play an important role in our environment. In addition, we gain many recreational, economic, and aesthetic benefits from them. Unfortunately, the activities of wildlife occasionally conflict with human interests in personal property, agricultural production, and health and safety. The most common wildlife damage and nuisance problems in Nebraska are caused by bats ...


Centre Canadian Cooperatif De La Sante De La Faune Centre Canadian Cooperatif De La Sante De La Faune, Rapport Annuel 2005-2006 (French) Oct 2006

Centre Canadian Cooperatif De La Sante De La Faune Centre Canadian Cooperatif De La Sante De La Faune, Rapport Annuel 2005-2006 (French)

Canadian Cooperative Wildlife Health Centre: Newsletters & Publications

À propos du CCCSF
Nos activités
Surveillance des maladies de la faune
Surveillance des maladies de la faune - Points saillants en 2005
Centre technologique d'information du CCCSF
Services d'information
Formation
Réponse aux maladies de la faune et gestion des maladies
Publications et rapports
Rapport financier 2005-2006 - Dépenses reliées au Programme de base
Personnel et associés du Centre Canadian coopératif de la santé de la faune 2005-2006
Conseil d’administration du Centre Canadien coopératif de la santé de la fanue en 2005-06


Book Review: Sampling Rare Or Elusive Species: Concepts, Designs, And Techniques For Estimating Population Parameters, Stewart W. Breck Oct 2006

Book Review: Sampling Rare Or Elusive Species: Concepts, Designs, And Techniques For Estimating Population Parameters, Stewart W. Breck

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

This book contains a collection of articles by Thompson and coauthors with the stated purpose of describing the latest sampling designs and counting (estimation) techniques for reliably estimating occupancy, abundance, and other population parameters of rare or elusive plants and animals. It is written primarily for the field ecologist who has some background in population monitoring and survey sampling but who has not kept current of new developments in sampling and estimation concepts targeted specifically at rare and elusive species. After reading this book, you will have a good appreciation of general difficulties associated with monitoring rare species but also ...


Extension Wildlife Programs: Thoughts And Ideas, Jeffrey J. Jackson Oct 2006

Extension Wildlife Programs: Thoughts And Ideas, Jeffrey J. Jackson

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The following commentary is a summary of some personal thoughts, reflections, and opinions on extension wildlife programming based on my experience at the University of Georgia as Extension Wildlife Specialist during the years between 1976 and 2001. I hope it will be of some value to new specialists. Because I was the only Extension Wildlife Specialist, I was in a unique position to develop an overview of the entire wildlife management field. Along the way, I had the opportunity to be full time within Extension, have a split appointment, and be assigned to an academic department.


An Internet Survey Of Private Pond Owners And Managers In Texas, Michael P. Masser, April E. Schonrock Oct 2006

An Internet Survey Of Private Pond Owners And Managers In Texas, Michael P. Masser, April E. Schonrock

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

The primary emphasis of this survey was to determine what specific problems Texas private impoundment owners/managers confront, how widely these problems occur, and where owners/managers get their information on pond management. A secondary emphasis was to examine the potential utilization of the Internet to gather information and distributed outreach materials. A random sample of 2,999 private impoundment (i.e., no public waters) applicants for Triploid Grass Carp Permits from Texas Parks and Wildlife was utilized as the survey mailing list. A 49-question survey was developed and placed on a secure web site. Each questionnaire contained five sections ...


Breaking Through The Food Plot Mentality, Christopher E. Moorman, Craig A. Harper, Christopher Deperno Oct 2006

Breaking Through The Food Plot Mentality, Christopher E. Moorman, Craig A. Harper, Christopher Deperno

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Landowners and other wildlife enthusiasts often desire instant gratification when attempting to attract wildlife to their properties. Advertisements distributed by television programs, outdoor publications, and conservation organizations have played a large part in creating the desire for a quick and easy fix. Landowners are erroneously led to believe food plots or plantings of nonnative shrubs and trees will raise the carrying capacity for target wildlife species, even though the typical privately-held property contains overstocked, high-graded timber, intensively maintained croplands, mowed roadsides and drainage ditches, fire-suppressed woodlands, and pastures vegetated with non-native grasses that provide no cover and poor-quality forage. In ...


Panel Discussion: The Future Of Natural Resources Extension, Gary San Julian Moderator Oct 2006

Panel Discussion: The Future Of Natural Resources Extension, Gary San Julian Moderator

11th Triennial National Wildlife & Fisheries Extension Specialists Conference (2006)

Today we want to talk about the future of Extension. At the committee meeting, we talked about what the important things were, and a high priority that everyone is concerned about is going to happen in 2020: Where is Extension going to be, where is the fisheries and wildlife program going to be, where are we in the states going to be, and what kind of support are we going to get?