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Broadcast Technology As Diversity Opportunity: Exchanging Market Power For Multiplexed Signal Set- Asides, Michael M. Epstein Dec 2006

Broadcast Technology As Diversity Opportunity: Exchanging Market Power For Multiplexed Signal Set- Asides, Michael M. Epstein

Federal Communications Law Journal

This Article proposes an access system based on a theory of quid pro quo: a bargained.for-exchange in which broadcasters would trade media access for market power. Under this quid pro quo approach, the FCC would administer a scaled metric whereby the greater a media company's audience reach, the more access that company must provide to citizens with diverse and local content. Since digital technology permits broadcasters to "multiplex" their television signal bandwidth into multiple signal programming streams, an opportunity exists for the government to require public access to one or more of these programming streams in return for ...


You Said What? The Perils Of Content-Based Regulation Of Public Broadcast Underwriting Acknowledgments, Andrew D. Cotlar Dec 2006

You Said What? The Perils Of Content-Based Regulation Of Public Broadcast Underwriting Acknowledgments, Andrew D. Cotlar

Federal Communications Law Journal

Public broadcast stations in the United States are forbidden to air promotional announcements in exchange for payment from commercial entities. However, these stations must acknowledge any financial contribution from donors that support particular programs without promoting the goods and services offered by those donors. While the FCC has attempted to maintain the conceptual distinction between promotional and nonpromotional information, it has struggled to apply this distinction within the context of an evolution in advertising practice.

As a result, many noncommercial educational licensees find it difficult to apply the FCC's rules. A careful analysis of how the FCC underwriting determinations ...


Foreword To: War, Terrorism And Torture: Limits On Presidential Power In The 21st Century Symposium, Dawn E. Johnsen Oct 2006

Foreword To: War, Terrorism And Torture: Limits On Presidential Power In The 21st Century Symposium, Dawn E. Johnsen

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: War, Terrorism and Torture: Limits on Presidential Power in the 21st Century. Convened by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the Indiana University School of Law- Bloomington, prominent legal scholars, human rights advocates and government lawyers gathered in Bloomington on October 7, 2005.


Can The President Be Torturer In Chief?., Harold Hongju Koh Oct 2006

Can The President Be Torturer In Chief?., Harold Hongju Koh

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: War, Terrorism and Torture: Limits on Presidential Power in the 21st Century. Convened by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the Indiana University School of Law- Bloomington, prominent legal scholars, human rights advocates and government lawyers gathered in Bloomington on October 7, 2005.


Lost Constitutional Moorings: Recovering The War Power, Louis Fisher Oct 2006

Lost Constitutional Moorings: Recovering The War Power, Louis Fisher

Indiana Law Journal

For the past half century, Presidents have claimed constitutional authority to take the country from a state of peace to a state of war against another nation. That was precisely the power that the Framers denied to the President and vested exclusively in Congress. That allocation of power was understood by all three branches until President Harry Truman went to war against North Korea in 1950. He never came to Congress for authority before he acted or at any time thereafter. Similar false claims of authority have been made by Presidents since that time. These constitutional violations have been assisted ...


The Executive And The Avoidance Canon, H. Jefferson Powell Oct 2006

The Executive And The Avoidance Canon, H. Jefferson Powell

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: War, Terrorism and Torture: Limits on Presidential Power in the 21st Century. Convened by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the Indiana University School of Law- Bloomington, prominent legal scholars, human rights advocates and government lawyers gathered in Bloomington on October 7, 2005.


Finding Effective Constraints On Executive Power: Interrogation, Detention, And Torture, Deborah N. Pearlstein Oct 2006

Finding Effective Constraints On Executive Power: Interrogation, Detention, And Torture, Deborah N. Pearlstein

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: War, Terrorism and Torture: Limits on Presidential Power in the 21st Century. Convened by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the Indiana University School of Law- Bloomington, prominent legal scholars, human rights advocates and government lawyers gathered in Bloomington on October 7, 2005.


Loaded Dice And Other Problems: A Further Reflection On The Statutory Commander In Chief, Christopher H. Schroeder Oct 2006

Loaded Dice And Other Problems: A Further Reflection On The Statutory Commander In Chief, Christopher H. Schroeder

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: War, Terrorism and Torture: Limits on Presidential Power in the 21st Century. Convened by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the Indiana University School of Law- Bloomington, prominent legal scholars, human rights advocates and government lawyers gathered in Bloomington on October 7, 2005.


Unitariness And Myopia: The Executive Branch, Legal Process, And Torture, Cornelia Pillard Oct 2006

Unitariness And Myopia: The Executive Branch, Legal Process, And Torture, Cornelia Pillard

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: War, Terrorism and Torture: Limits on Presidential Power in the 21st Century. Convened by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the Indiana University School of Law- Bloomington, prominent legal scholars, human rights advocates and government lawyers gathered in Bloomington on October 7, 2005.


Regulating The Commander In Chief: Some Theories, Saikrishna Prakash Oct 2006

Regulating The Commander In Chief: Some Theories, Saikrishna Prakash

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: War, Terrorism and Torture: Limits on Presidential Power in the 21st Century. Convened by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the Indiana University School of Law- Bloomington, prominent legal scholars, human rights advocates and government lawyers gathered in Bloomington on October 7, 2005.


The War Powers Outside The Courts, William Michael Treanor Oct 2006

The War Powers Outside The Courts, William Michael Treanor

Indiana Law Journal

Symposium: War, Terrorism and Torture: Limits on Presidential Power in the 21st Century. Convened by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy and the Indiana University School of Law- Bloomington, prominent legal scholars, human rights advocates and government lawyers gathered in Bloomington on October 7, 2005.


The National Security Agency's Domestic Spying Program: Framing The Debate (Including Relevant Documents), David Cole, Martin S. Lederman Oct 2006

The National Security Agency's Domestic Spying Program: Framing The Debate (Including Relevant Documents), David Cole, Martin S. Lederman

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Separation Of Church And State In The United States: Lost In Translation, Carol J. Greenhouse Jul 2006

Separation Of Church And State In The United States: Lost In Translation, Carol J. Greenhouse

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

In this article, the absence of an American equivalent to the French word laĭcité becomes an ethnographic opening to an exploration of the church-state divide in the U.S. context. Drawing on classic social theory, sociological accounts, and current events, I suggest that the constitutional separation of church and state-in addition to whatever it may mean in legal terms-also expresses a cultural proposition. Specifically, the separation of church and state posits a dual role for local communities as both the source of federal power (through representative government) and the foundation of its moral authority. The latter role can be sustained ...


Church And State In The United States: Competing Conceptions And Historic Changes, Douglas Laycock Jul 2006

Church And State In The United States: Competing Conceptions And Historic Changes, Douglas Laycock

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

This article, originally written for a French audience, attempts to explain the American law of church and state from the ground up, assuming no background information. Basic legal provisions are explained. The relevant American history is periodized in three alignments of religious conflict: Protestant-Protestant, Protestant-Catholic, and religious-secular. Some frequently heard concepts are explained, distinguished, and related to each other-separation, voluntarism, equality, formal and substantive neutrality, liberty, toleration, and state action. Finally, the principal disputes over religious liberty are assessed in three broad areas-funding of religiously affiliated activities, religious speech (with and without government sponsorship), and regulation of religious practice. These ...


Laïcité In The United States Or The Separation Of Church And State In Pluralist Society, Elisabeth Zoller Jul 2006

Laïcité In The United States Or The Separation Of Church And State In Pluralist Society, Elisabeth Zoller

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

No abstract provided.


Religious Expression And Symbolism In The American Constitutional Tradition: Government Neutrality, But Not Indifference, Daniel O. Conkle Jul 2006

Religious Expression And Symbolism In The American Constitutional Tradition: Government Neutrality, But Not Indifference, Daniel O. Conkle

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

In this article, I describe and analyze three principles of First Amendment doctrine. First, the Establishment Clause generally forbids governmental expression that has the purpose or effect of promoting or endorsing religion. Second, and conversely, private religious expression is broadly defined and is strongly protected by the Free Speech Clause. Third, as an implicit exception to the first principle, the government itself is sometimes permitted to engage in expression that seemingly does promote and endorse religion, but only when the expression is noncoercive, nonsectarian, and embedded within (or at least in harmony with) longstanding historical tradition. Comparing these three principles ...


Secularization, Religiosity, And The United States Constitution, Christopher L. Eisgruber Jul 2006

Secularization, Religiosity, And The United States Constitution, Christopher L. Eisgruber

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

This article draws upon leading works in the sociology of religion to assess what I shall call "the secularization claim" regarding the United States. It endeavors, in particular to clarify the possible meanings of "secularization,"and then to use these conceptual refinements to examine what sort of evidence exists that the United States has been secularized. Though it is not possible to falsify every version of the secularization claim, there is little evidence to support it, especially in its most prominent and politically relevant variations. The article then goes on to offer a preliminary analysis of to what extent, if ...


Why Religion In Politics Does Not Violate La Conception Américaine De La Laïcité, Michael J. Perry Jul 2006

Why Religion In Politics Does Not Violate La Conception Américaine De La Laïcité, Michael J. Perry

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

La conception Am6ricaine de la Laĭcité consists principally of a constitutional norm-the nonestablishment norm-and of the laW that the U.S. Supreme Court has developed in the course of enforcing the norm. The nonestablishment norm forbids government-both the national government and state government-to "establish" religion. American laYcit6 also consists of what we may call "the morality of liberal democracy. " My aim in this essay is to explain why religion in politics does not violate American laYcit6; more specifically, my aim is to explain why political reliance on religiously grounded morality violates neither the nonestablishment norm nor the morality of liberal ...


Reconsidering Reparations, Alfred L. Brophy Jul 2006

Reconsidering Reparations, Alfred L. Brophy

Indiana Law Journal

Eric Posner's and Adrian Vermeule's essay, Reparations for Slavery and Other Historic Injustices, seeks a framework for defining reparations and evaluating reparations claims. It explores a limited set of past reparations, as well as the connections between those asked to pay reparations and past wrongdoers, and the connections between those receiving reparations and those injured in the past. Posner and Vermeule use that framework to evaluate the morality of reparations and the legal problems that arise in implementing reparations proposals.

This Essay takes up the Posner-Vermeule analysis at several points. It challenges their limited definition of reparations and ...


Creation Of The Media: A Review And Introspective, Shannon M. Heim Jun 2006

Creation Of The Media: A Review And Introspective, Shannon M. Heim

Federal Communications Law Journal

A review of Paul Starr's Creation of the Media, Basic Books 2004. This review discusses the historical treatment that Starr presents in his narrative of modern communications, particularly focusing on the "constitutive moments" in the growth of the media.


Private Eyes Are Watching You: With The Implementation Of The E-911 Mandate, Who Will Watch Every Move You Make?, Geoffrey D. Smith Jun 2006

Private Eyes Are Watching You: With The Implementation Of The E-911 Mandate, Who Will Watch Every Move You Make?, Geoffrey D. Smith

Federal Communications Law Journal

The FCC's E-911 mandate, which will ensure that emergency operators automatically receive a caller's location information, should help save lives. However, privacy advocates have expressed concern over the potential for wireless carriers, the government, and third parties to collect and store personal information. Congress has addressed these concerns with legislation, but privacy advocates still worry that consumers are not adequately protected. This Note addresses this concern and argues that in order to ensure consumer protection, additions are needed to section 222 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. The Note discusses the importance of individual privacy and balances it ...


Cable Operators' Fifth Amendment Claims Applied To Digital Must-Carry, Nissa Laughner, Justin Brown Apr 2006

Cable Operators' Fifth Amendment Claims Applied To Digital Must-Carry, Nissa Laughner, Justin Brown

Federal Communications Law Journal

This Article addresses the legal and policy implications of property rights in the digital must-carry issue. The Authors review must-carry regulations, present a traditional Fifth Amendment analysis of must-carry, address free speech implications of that property-based analysis, and show how property-based claims might influence future cable regulations and policies. The Authors conclude that while the Fifth Amendment claims are unlikely to succeed legally, they do contain significant rhetorical power that can help shift public policy in ways favorable to the cable industry.


Rethinking Regulation Of Advertising Aimed At Children, William A. Ramsey Apr 2006

Rethinking Regulation Of Advertising Aimed At Children, William A. Ramsey

Federal Communications Law Journal

In 1990, Congress passed the Children's Television Act ("CTA"), which directed the FCC to establish standards for broadcasters regarding the amount of children's programming aired and to enforce limits on the amount of commercial time aired during children's programming. The limits are meant to protect children from various harms caused by advertising aimed at children. This Note examines the constitutionality and the effectiveness of these commercial limits. The Note concludes that while the CTA's commercial limits are probably constitutional under the Court's test for regulations of commercial speech, the limits do not provide children with ...


Taking The Initiative: Political Parties, Primary Elections, And The Constitutional Guarantee Of Republican Governance, Gavin M. Rose Apr 2006

Taking The Initiative: Political Parties, Primary Elections, And The Constitutional Guarantee Of Republican Governance, Gavin M. Rose

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Davey's Deviant Discretion: An Incorporated Establishment Clause Should Require The State To Maintain Funding Neutrality, Nina S. Schultz Apr 2006

Davey's Deviant Discretion: An Incorporated Establishment Clause Should Require The State To Maintain Funding Neutrality, Nina S. Schultz

Indiana Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Theocratic Constitutionalism: An Introduction To A New Global Legal Ordering, Larry Catá Backer Jan 2006

Theocratic Constitutionalism: An Introduction To A New Global Legal Ordering, Larry Catá Backer

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

The twentieth century has seen a fundamental shift in the ways in which constitutions are understood. By the middle of the twentieth century, a new sort of constitutionalism emerged, rejecting the idea of the legitimacy of every form of political selfconstitution. The central assumptions of this new constitutionalism were grounded in the belief that not all constitutions were legitimate, and that legitimate constitutions shared a number of universal common characteristics. These common characteristics were both procedural (against arbitrary use of state power) and substantive (limiting the sorts of policy choices states could make in constituting its government and exercising governance ...


Toward A Limited Right Of Access To Jury Deliberations, Torrence Lewis Jan 2006

Toward A Limited Right Of Access To Jury Deliberations, Torrence Lewis

Federal Communications Law Journal

Jury deliberations receive extensive protection from public examination. These protections make jury deliberations much less accessible to the public than most other governmental deliberations. This Comment examines the constitutional, common law, and statutory protections for jury deliberations and the dangers that these protections seek to prevent. The Author argues that a limited post-verdict right of access to jury deliberations could restore public faith in the jury and could eventually improve the quality of jury deliberations. The Author suggests a possible framework that would provide the public with a limited right of access and still address the primary concerns that led ...


The Use And Misuse Of Comparative Constitutional Law (The George P. Smith Lecture In International Law), Cheryl Saunders Jan 2006

The Use And Misuse Of Comparative Constitutional Law (The George P. Smith Lecture In International Law), Cheryl Saunders

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

This article examines the extent and nature of the use of foreign law in constitutional adjudication in common law systems outside the United States, with special reference to Australia. Demonstrating that the courts of other common law jurisdictions use foreign case law readily, naturally, and for a variety of purposes, the article reaches two broad conclusions: (1) as a generalization, other common law countries do not share the concern about the legitimacy of comparative precedents that manifests itself in the United States, and (2) as a consequence, other common law countries necessarily share with the United States an interest in ...


Sovereignty, Not Due Process: Personal Jurisdiction Over Nonresident, Alien Defendants, Austen L. Parrish Jan 2006

Sovereignty, Not Due Process: Personal Jurisdiction Over Nonresident, Alien Defendants, Austen L. Parrish

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The Due Process Clause with its focus on a defendant's liberty interest has become the key, if not only, limitation on a court's exercise of personal jurisdiction. This due process jurisdictional limitation is universally assumed to apply with equal force to alien defendants as to domestic defendants. With few exceptions, scholars do not distinguish between the two. Neither do the courts. Countless cases assume that foreigners have all the rights of United States citizens to object to extraterritorial assertions of personal jurisdiction.

But is this assumption sound? This Article explores the uncritical assumption that the same due process ...


Preclearance, Discrimination, And The Department Of Justice: The Case Of South Carolina, Luis Fuentes-Rohwer, Guy-Uriel E. Charles Jan 2006

Preclearance, Discrimination, And The Department Of Justice: The Case Of South Carolina, Luis Fuentes-Rohwer, Guy-Uriel E. Charles

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.