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Role Of Emotion Regulation In The Relationship Between Fears Of Evaluation And Social Anxiety, Jaismeen Dua Jan 2019

Role Of Emotion Regulation In The Relationship Between Fears Of Evaluation And Social Anxiety, Jaismeen Dua

Masters Theses

Cognitive components influencing social anxiety have been well-researched for decades, especially fear of negative evaluation (Clark & Wells, 1995; Hofmann, 2007; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997; Schlenker & Leary, 1982). Relatively recent and emerging research has suggested a strong link between fear of negative evaluation and fear of positive evaluation, and how both of them influence social anxiety (Weeks, Heimberg, & Rodebaugh, 2008; Weeks et al., 2007; Weeks & Howell, 2012; Weeks et al., 2009). This study examined social anxiety in relation to both fear of negative evaluation and fear of positive evaluation. Findings from the study replicated previous research results, highlighting links between both fears of evaluation (negative and positive) and social anxiety. The role of emotion dysregulation in psychopathology is also an emerging research topic, and researchers have studied various emotion regulation strategies to identify maladaptive usage (Kring & Werner, 2004; Hofmann et al., 2012; Aldao & Schweizer ...


Age Group Differences In Affect Responses To A Stressor, Molly Mather Jan 2018

Age Group Differences In Affect Responses To A Stressor, Molly Mather

Masters Theses

Older adults may be better able to modulate their emotional experiences than younger adults, and thus may recover more quickly from negative stressors. Additionally, older adults may be more likely to experience co-occurrence of negative and positive emotions in the setting of negative stressors, which may facilitate emotion recovery. To date, few studies have investigated the nature of age group differences in spontaneous emotional responses to a standardized stressor. The current study utilizes a laboratory mood manipulation to determine age group differences in emotion recovery in negative and positive affects, as well as age group differences in the co-occurrence of ...


Borderline Personality And Risk-Taking: Examining The Role Of Impulsivity Across Domains, Colten Karnedy Jan 2018

Borderline Personality And Risk-Taking: Examining The Role Of Impulsivity Across Domains, Colten Karnedy

Masters Theses

Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and high levels of BPD traits have demonstrated greater rates of engagement in risky, self-destructive behaviors compared to healthy controls. Specifically, impulsivity has been theorized to underlie many of these risky behaviors. Although existing self-report literature suggests that individuals with BPD are more impulsive than controls, evidence from behavioral measures remains inconclusive. Likewise, there is scant research examining specific domains of impulsivity associated with risky behaviors in BPD, which is problematic given that impulsivity is a diagnostic criterion for BPD. Thus, the proposed research aims to bridge this gap in the literature by examining ...


A Meta-Analysis Of The Facial Feedback Literature: Effects Of Facial Expressions On Emotional Experience Are Small And Variable, Nicholas Alvaro Coles Dec 2017

A Meta-Analysis Of The Facial Feedback Literature: Effects Of Facial Expressions On Emotional Experience Are Small And Variable, Nicholas Alvaro Coles

Masters Theses

The facial feedback hypothesis suggests that our facial expressions influence our emotional experience. In light of Wagenmakers et al.’s (2016) failure to replicate Strack, Martin, and Stepper’s (1988) seminal demonstration of facial feedback effects, a meta-analysis was conducted on 286 effect sizes derived from 136 facial feedback studies. Results revealed that the overall effect of facial feedback on affective experience was significant, but small (d = .20, p < .000000005).Approximately 70% of variation in facial feedback effect sizes is due to heterogeneity, which suggests that facial feedback effects are stronger in some circumstances than others. Eleven potential moderators were examined, and three were associated with differences in effect sizes: (1) Type of affective reaction: Facial feedback influenced emotional experience (e.g., reported amusement) and, to an even greater degree, perceptions of stimuli’s affective quality (e.g., funniness of cartoons). However, after controlling for publication bias, there was little evidence that facial feedback influenced perceptions of affective quality. (2) Presence of emotional stimuli: Facial feedback effects on emotional experience were larger in the absence of emotionally evocative stimuli (e.g., cartoons). (3) Type of stimuli: When participants are presented with emotionally evocative stimuli, facial feedback effects were larger in the presence of some types of stimuli (e.g., imagined scenarios) than others (e.g., pictures).


Positive And Negative Emotion, Group Climate, And Ethnocultural Empathy In Intergroup Dialogue, Keri Frantell May 2016

Positive And Negative Emotion, Group Climate, And Ethnocultural Empathy In Intergroup Dialogue, Keri Frantell

Masters Theses

We examined shared emotional experiences of 89 participants in 24 intergroup dialogue (IGD) groups at a large, public university in the Southeastern US. These groups brought together students for sustained dialogue about gender, race and ethnicity, religion and spirituality, sexual orientation, or social class and associated forms of privilege and oppression. They were designed to develop: (a) relationships across groups, (b) critical social consciousness, and (c) capacities to promote social justice. Dialogue groups met for eight consecutive weeks. After each session, participants completed measures of group climate and positive and negative emotion during the session. In addition, they completed a ...


The Influence Of Discrete Emotional States On Preferential Choice, Andrea M. Cataldo Jan 2016

The Influence Of Discrete Emotional States On Preferential Choice, Andrea M. Cataldo

Masters Theses

Past research has shown that emotion affects preferential choice outcomes. The goal of the present study was to further research on emotion and preferential choice by using mathematical modeling to investigate the effects of specific dimensions of emotion on the underlying mechanisms of preferential choice. Specifically, we aimed to determine whether the concurrent effects of positive-negative valence and situational certainty on attention and information accumulation threshold, respectively, would influence the magnitude of the similarity effect, a robust phenomenon in preferential choice. Participants first underwent either an Anger (negative and certain), Fear (negative and uncertain), or no (Control) emotion manipulation. All ...