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Annotated World Bibliography Of Host Plants Of The Melon Fly, Bactrocera Cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), Grant T. Mcquate, Nicanor J. Liquido, Kelly A. A. Nakamichi Jan 2017

Annotated World Bibliography Of Host Plants Of The Melon Fly, Bactrocera Cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), Grant T. Mcquate, Nicanor J. Liquido, Kelly A. A. Nakamichi

Insecta Mundi

The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a widespread, economically important tephritid fruit fly species. Bactrocera cucurbitae infests fruits and vegetables of a number of different plant species, with many host plants in the plant family Cucurbitaceae, but with additional hosts scattered across many other plant families. Although thought to be native to India, its distribution has spread throughout many countries in Oriental Asia, into a number of Pacific Island nations, and into Africa. The documented introductions into countries outside its native distribution show that this species could establish in other countries where it does not presently occur ...


First Record On Secondary Pollen Presentation In The Cucurbitaceae Family, Shivani Jadeja Jan 2015

First Record On Secondary Pollen Presentation In The Cucurbitaceae Family, Shivani Jadeja

Faculty Publications in the Biological Sciences

Aim – Secondary pollen presentation in flowers has been described only in a few species across about 25 plant families. The first report of secondary pollen presentation in the Cucurbitaceae family is given here.

Key result Sechium talamancensis, endemic to high elevations in Costa Rica, presents nearly 39% of its pollen secondarily on the distal ends of its petals. The remaining pollen is presented on the anthers, the primary pollen presenters.

Significance – Closely related and commercially important congeners of S. talamancensis do not show secondary pollen presentation. Potential selective advantages of the phenomenon that differentiates S. talamancensis from its lower elevation ...


Cucumis Zambianus (Cucurbitaceae), A New Species From Northwestern Zambia, Mark P. Widrlechner, Joseph H. Kirkbride Jr., Amanuel G. Ghebretinsae, Kathleen R. Reitsma Oct 2008

Cucumis Zambianus (Cucurbitaceae), A New Species From Northwestern Zambia, Mark P. Widrlechner, Joseph H. Kirkbride Jr., Amanuel G. Ghebretinsae, Kathleen R. Reitsma

NCRPIS Publications and Papers

During germplasm explorations within Zambia in 1984, seven Cucumis accessions were collected that could not be identified to species. Two of the accessions were studied in-depth. Based on phenotypic characters, they were closest to Cucumis pustulatus. In ITS analyses of all available Cucumis species and the accessions, the two accessions grouped with 100% bootstrap support in a clade comprising C. anguria, C. dipsaceus, C. insignis, and C. pustulatus. The accessions differed from these four Cucumis species by the following characters: plants pilose, male inflorescences paniculate with 6-30 flowers, staminate-flower calyx lobes linear, pistillate-flower pedicels long and cylindrical, and a genetic ...


Oil And Tocopherol Content And Composition Of Pumpkin Seed Oil In 12 Cultivars, David G. Stevenson, Fred J. Eller, Liping Wang, Jay-Lin Jane, Tong Wang, George E. Inglett Jan 2007

Oil And Tocopherol Content And Composition Of Pumpkin Seed Oil In 12 Cultivars, David G. Stevenson, Fred J. Eller, Liping Wang, Jay-Lin Jane, Tong Wang, George E. Inglett

Food Science and Human Nutrition Publications

No abstract provided.


Individual And Population Aspects Of Interactions Between Cucurbits And Pseudoperonospora Cubensis: Pathotypes And Races, A. Lebeda, M. P. Widrlechner, J. Urban Jan 2006

Individual And Population Aspects Of Interactions Between Cucurbits And Pseudoperonospora Cubensis: Pathotypes And Races, A. Lebeda, M. P. Widrlechner, J. Urban

NCRPIS Conference Papers, Posters and Presentations

This paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding variation in interactions between Cucurbitaceae and Pseudoperonospora cubensis as a backdrop for the development and use of systems to characterize pathogenicity at the individual and population levels. Host-parasite specificity and interactions between Cucurbitaceae and P. cubensis exhibit significant variation on both the individual and population level. However, our phytopathological and genetic knowledge of the interactions between individual P. cubensis isolates and a broad range of accessions of most important genera of cultivated cucurbits (e.g., Cucumis, Cucurbita, Citrullus) remains limited. Recently, an improved differential set of cucurbit accessions was developed to ...


Effects Of Shelterbelts On The Aerial Distribution Of Insect Pests In Muskmelon, Mary Ellen Dix, Laurie Hodges, James R. Brandle, Robert J. Wright, Mark O. Harrell Apr 1997

Effects Of Shelterbelts On The Aerial Distribution Of Insect Pests In Muskmelon, Mary Ellen Dix, Laurie Hodges, James R. Brandle, Robert J. Wright, Mark O. Harrell

Faculty Publications: Department of Entomology

Sticky traps were used to measure how tree shelterbelts influence the abundance of crop insect pests and beneficial arthropods in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) plots in eastern Nebraska. Abundance of striped cucumber beetles {Acalymma vittatum Fabricius (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)} , southern corn rootworms {Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)}, and northern corn rootworms {D. barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)} was similar in exposed and sheltered plots. Western corn rootworms {D. virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)} were significantly more abundant in exposed plots. More lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and ichneumonid wasps (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) were caught on traps in sheltered plots than exposed plots, especially ...


Muskmelons, P. Prasher Apr 1978

Muskmelons, P. Prasher

Agricultural Experiment Station Circulars

The muskmelon is a popular crop although not an easy one to grow in all parts of South Dakota. But in many localized areas it is grown in market and truck gardens as a specialty crop. Muskmelons are generally considered a warm-season crop. They require soil temperatures of at least 55° F; even below 60°F, growth is slow. Muskmelons are stunted by chilling temperatures (33° to 45°F) and are readily killed by frost.