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Executive Aggrandizement In Foreign Affairs Lawmaking, Michael P. Van Alstine May 2006

Executive Aggrandizement In Foreign Affairs Lawmaking, Michael P. Van Alstine

Faculty Scholarship

This article analyzes the power of the President to create federal law on the foundation of the executive’s status as the constitutional representative of the United States in foreign affairs. Executive branch advocates have claimed such a power throughout constitutional history. Recent events also have revived this constitutional controversy with particular vigor. In specific, President Bush recently issued a surprise “Determination” which asserted that the implied executive powers of Article II of the Constitution permit the President to enforce in domestic law the obligations owed to foreign states under international law.

The article first sets the legal and factual ...


Enumeration And Other Constitutional Strategies For Protecting Rights: The View From 1787/1791, Mark A. Graber Jan 2006

Enumeration And Other Constitutional Strategies For Protecting Rights: The View From 1787/1791, Mark A. Graber

Faculty Scholarship

This paper interprets the constitution of 1791 in light of the constitution of 1787. The persons responsible for the original constitution thought they had secured fundamental rights by a combination of representation, the separation of powers, and the extended republic. The Bill of Rights, in their view, was a minor supplement to the strategies previously employed for preventing abusive government practices. Proposed amendments were less a list of fundamental freedoms than an enumeration of those rights likely to appease moderate anti-Federalists. That many vaguely phrased rights lacked clear legal meaning was of little concern to their Federalist sponsors, who trusted ...


Gender And Constitutional Design, Paula A. Monopoli Jan 2006

Gender And Constitutional Design, Paula A. Monopoli

Faculty Scholarship

Does the allocation of power between the legislative and executive branches, and the way we define the scope of the executive affect whether women ascend to executive office? In this article, Professor Monopoli argues that the constitutional process of boundary-drawing between the legislative and executive branches of government has implications for how successful women will be in ascending to executive positions. She posits that the Hamiltonian vision of an expansive executive with plenary power is the model least likely to result in women’s ascending to executive office. The essay traces the philosophical heritage of Hamilton’s vision and outlines ...


The Terrorist Surveillance Program And The Constitution, John Yoo Jan 2006

The Terrorist Surveillance Program And The Constitution, John Yoo

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Who's Afraid Of The Eleventh Amendment - The Limited Impact Of The Court's Sovereign Immunity Rulings, Jesse H. Choper, John C. Yoo Jan 2006

Who's Afraid Of The Eleventh Amendment - The Limited Impact Of The Court's Sovereign Immunity Rulings, Jesse H. Choper, John C. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Is Suspension A Political Question, Amanda L. Tyler Jan 2006

Is Suspension A Political Question, Amanda L. Tyler

Faculty Scholarship

The article focuses on the Suspension Clause of the U.S. Constitution being a political issue. It says that once suspension is viewed as a nonjusticiable political question, it would turn as a subject on which most of the restraints imposed by the Constitution would not be subjected to judicial enforcement. It is claimed that such thought should be denied because it is at odds of writ of habeas corpus heritage and would only complicate the separation of powers and the institution of judicial reviews.


Access And Exclusion Rights In Electronic Media:Complex Rules For A Complex World, Daniel A. Farber Jan 2006

Access And Exclusion Rights In Electronic Media:Complex Rules For A Complex World, Daniel A. Farber

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Grutter At Work: A Title Vii Critique Of Constitutional Affirmative Action, Jessica Bulman-Pozen Jan 2006

Grutter At Work: A Title Vii Critique Of Constitutional Affirmative Action, Jessica Bulman-Pozen

Faculty Scholarship

This Note argues that Title VII doctrine both illuminates internal contradictions of Grutter v. Bollinger and provides a framework for reading the opinion. Grutter's diversity rationale is a broad endorsement of integration that hinges on the quantitative concept of critical mass, but the opinion's narrow-tailoring discussion instead points to a model of racial difference that champions subjective decisionmaking and threatens to jettison numerical accountability. Title VII doctrine supports a reading of Grutter that privileges a view of diversity as integration and therefore cautions against the opinion's conception of narrow tailoring. Grutter, in turn, can productively inform employment ...