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2006

Family Law

Institution
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Beyond Interstate Recognition In The Same-Sex Marriage Debate, Gary J. Simson Dec 2006

Beyond Interstate Recognition In The Same-Sex Marriage Debate, Gary J. Simson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The national same-sex marriage debate has been dominated for the past decade by the interstate recognition issue. This article seeks to shift the focus of the debate to same-sex marriage prohibitions themselves and their incompatibility with several limitations of federal constitutional law.

After showing the legal irrelevance of the Defense of Marriage Act to the interstate recognition issue, the article addresses the proper resolution of that choice-of-law issue through the lens of a well-known New York Court of Appeals decision. In that case, despite New York's ban on uncle-niece marriage, the New York high court - one of the most ...


Reconsidering Spousal Privileges After Crawford, R. Michael Cassidy Nov 2006

Reconsidering Spousal Privileges After Crawford, R. Michael Cassidy

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this article the author explores how domestic violence prevention efforts have been adversely impacted by the Supreme Court’s new “testimonial” approach to the confrontation clause. Examining the Court’s trilogy of cases from Crawford to Davis and Hammon, the author argues that the introduction of certain forms of hearsay in criminal cases has been drastically limited by the court’s new originalist approach to the Sixth Amendment. The author explains how state spousal privilege statutes often present a significant barrier to obtaining live testimony from victims of domestic violence. The author then argues that state legislatures should reconsider ...


Foreword To The Special Issue On The Family Law Education Reform Project, Andrew Schepard, Peter Salem Oct 2006

Foreword To The Special Issue On The Family Law Education Reform Project, Andrew Schepard, Peter Salem

Hofstra Law Faculty Scholarship

The purpose of this issue is to promote a dialogue between the family law academic community and stakeholders in the family law system about how future family lawyers should be educated. Family law practice has undergone dramatic change in the last quarter century, perhaps more than any other area of practice. Virtually everything about it has changed—the role of the family court, the procedure for resolving family disputes, the role of the family lawyer, and the substantive law. It is a vibrant and exciting field, with great influence on the lives of families and children.

The family law curriculum ...


Same-Sex Marriage In New York, Lewis A. Silverman Aug 2006

Same-Sex Marriage In New York, Lewis A. Silverman

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


In Memoriam – Monroe L. Inker: 1925-2006, Sanford N. Katz Jun 2006

In Memoriam – Monroe L. Inker: 1925-2006, Sanford N. Katz

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


Questioning The Fundamental Right To Marry, Joseph A. Pull May 2006

Questioning The Fundamental Right To Marry, Joseph A. Pull

Student Scholarship Papers

The Supreme Court has adopted the doctrine of a constitutional “fundamental right to marry,” and has construed this doctrine to mean a fundamental right to state-recognized legal-marriage. However, the doctrine has several problems: (a) the Court never satisfactorily explains why marriage is a fundamental right; (b) the Court never defines the boundaries of marriage as a fundamental right; and (c) the Court has occasionally treated marriage as if it were not a fundamental right.

Further, the idea of a “fundamental right to marry” contains a debilitating internal contradiction: the notion of a fundamental right implies firm privileges which the state ...


Methamphetamine Addiction, Treatment, And Outcomes: Implications For Child Welfare Workers, Cathleen Otero, Sharon Boles, Nancy Young, Kim Dennis Apr 2006

Methamphetamine Addiction, Treatment, And Outcomes: Implications For Child Welfare Workers, Cathleen Otero, Sharon Boles, Nancy Young, Kim Dennis

Publications of the Center on Children, Families, and the Law (and related organizations)

Methamphetamine is a highly addictive stimulant associated with serious health and psychiatric conditions, including heart damage and brain damage, impaired thinking and memory problems, aggression, violence, and psychotic behavior. Methamphetamine is also associated with the transmission of infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis.

Child welfare workers are seeing growing numbers of children and families affected by the parent’s use of methamphetamine. In order to make sound decisions for the benefit of children and families, child welfare workers need accurate information about methamphetamine, its effects on parents and their children, and the effectiveness of treatment. This paper presents ...


The Use Of Hair Analysis To Test Children For Exposure To Methamphetamine, Michael T. Flannery, Jerry Jones, Karen Farst, Karen Bord Worley Apr 2006

The Use Of Hair Analysis To Test Children For Exposure To Methamphetamine, Michael T. Flannery, Jerry Jones, Karen Farst, Karen Bord Worley

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Legal Status Of Pregnant And Parenting Youth In Foster Care, Cynthia Godsoe, Eve Stotland Apr 2006

The Legal Status Of Pregnant And Parenting Youth In Foster Care, Cynthia Godsoe, Eve Stotland

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Family Boundaries: Third-Party Rights And Obligations With Respect To Children, Joanna L. Grossman Apr 2006

Family Boundaries: Third-Party Rights And Obligations With Respect To Children, Joanna L. Grossman

Hofstra Law Faculty Scholarship

The article introduces the topics discussed within the issue, which defines the law pertaining to the rights and obligations of a third parties with respect to children in the U.S. According to the author, the articles regard whether the law should recognize a continuum of those adults with claims to children in which a third party might deserve more or fewer rights based on his relationship with the child. In the article "Philosophy, Morality and Parental Priority," the fundamental right of parents to raise their children is being dealt with. Another article talks about the rights of same-sex partners ...


Review Of Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution In Child Support Enforcement, By Irwin Garfinkel, Sara S. Mclanahan, Daniel R. Meyer, And Judith A. Seltzer, Ryan E. Spohn Mar 2006

Review Of Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution In Child Support Enforcement, By Irwin Garfinkel, Sara S. Mclanahan, Daniel R. Meyer, And Judith A. Seltzer, Ryan E. Spohn

Criminology and Criminal Justice Faculty Publications

The title of this book adequately reflects its timely focus on nonresidential fathers facing increased child support enforcement, examining how child support contributions (or failure to meet child support obligations) affect the lives of children as well as the fathers themselves. As the authors suggest, nonresident fathers have generally been treated as financial resources, with little attention paid to their rights as parents or their needs as providers for their children. A particular focus of this collection of studies is the role of indigent nonresident fathers and their role as parents and providers. Consequently, the scope of study adopted by ...


Prenuptial Agreements: A New Reason To Revive An Old Rule, Jeffrey G. Sherman Mar 2006

Prenuptial Agreements: A New Reason To Revive An Old Rule, Jeffrey G. Sherman

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Bringing Up Baby: Adoption, Marriage, And The Best Interests Of The Child, Robin Fretwell Wilson, W. Bradford Wilcox Feb 2006

Bringing Up Baby: Adoption, Marriage, And The Best Interests Of The Child, Robin Fretwell Wilson, W. Bradford Wilcox

Faculty Scholarship

In the piece, Professor Brad Wilcox and I ask who should care for children when their biological parents cannot? This is a question of potentially explosive dimensions under new definitions of legal parentage proposed in this volume of the WILLIAM & MARY BILL OF RIGHTS JOURNAL. This question is also important today for evaluating state adoption laws. A significant number of states bar consideration of a prospective adopter’s marital or non-marital status. We believe these laws miss an important opportunity to maximize the best interests of each child being placed. In this piece, we take an exclusively child-centered approach, drawing on an enormous body of social science on family structure and child well-being. We begin with a critical look at the studies showing that children are significantly more likely to thrive if they are raised in a home headed by two married parents. Here, the social science is clear: on average, children do best in a married home, compared to the alternatives, and for this reason adoption laws and regulations should clearly favor married parents. The social science is less clear on the advantage that a single parent might have compared to cohabiting parents; here, we think the science suggests that a single parent might offer more stability and safety to a child than a cohabiting couple. We then propose model legislation to institute these preferences. We endorse a strong preference that gives first consideration to married couples and a weak preference to single parents compared to cohabiting couples. We also consider and reject ...


Parentage At Birth: Birthfathers And Social Fatherhood, Nancy E. Dowd Feb 2006

Parentage At Birth: Birthfathers And Social Fatherhood, Nancy E. Dowd

UF Law Faculty Publications

Deciding who should be a child's legal parents at birth seems a simple task. Instinctively, the answer is the child's biological mother and father. Historically, the answer would have been different depending on whether the child was born within a marriage or not; marriage trumped biology, at least with respect to fathers. A husband was generally presumed to be the father of a child born to his wife, even if there was no genetic connection. A number of changes have moved parentage away from the marital/genetic/patriarchal model that valued the marital family above genes or social ...


Protecting Children By Preserving Parenthood, Jane C. Murphy Feb 2006

Protecting Children By Preserving Parenthood, Jane C. Murphy

All Faculty Scholarship

Establishing legal parentage, once a relatively straightforward matter of marriage and biology, has become increasingly complex. The determination of legal status as mother may now involve several women making claims based on genetic contribution, contract, status as gestational carrier or other bases. The debate about the best choice for children when adults are competing for parental status is ongoing, lively and filled with many voices. Less attention has been paid to a much larger, second category of cases - cases in which the law is faced with resolving the legal status of the one adult who may be available to serve ...


Foster Children Paying For Foster Care, Daniel L. Hatcher Feb 2006

Foster Children Paying For Foster Care, Daniel L. Hatcher

All Faculty Scholarship

This Article examines the legality and policy concerns of state foster care agencies using children's Social Security benefits as a state funding stream. The practice requires foster children who are disabled or have deceased or disabled parents to pay for their own care. Often with the assistance of private consultants under contingency fee contracts, agencies look for children who are eligible for Social Security benefits and interject themselves as the children's representative payees. Rather than using the benefits to serve the children's unmet needs, the agencies use their fiduciary power to access the children's benefits and ...


What's Sex Got To Do With It? Tax And The 'Family' In Canada, Claire F.L. Young Jan 2006

What's Sex Got To Do With It? Tax And The 'Family' In Canada, Claire F.L. Young

Faculty Publications (Emeriti)

This article considers the tax treatment of spouses and common law partners. It questions whether tax expenditures that take spousal or common law status into account can be justified or whether some or all of them should be eliminated. The article traces the expansion in Canada of the definition of common law partners for tax purposes because it resulted in a tax windfall for the government and was key tool in implementing a neo-liberal privatization agenda. The article concludes that many of the tax rules that take spousal or common law status into account should be repealed. Some rules are ...


Do Ask And Do Tell: Rethinking The Lawyer’S Duty To Warn In Domestic Violence Cases, Margaret B. Drew, Sarah Buel Jan 2006

Do Ask And Do Tell: Rethinking The Lawyer’S Duty To Warn In Domestic Violence Cases, Margaret B. Drew, Sarah Buel

Faculty Publications

Empirical data document that while domestic violence victims face high risk of recurring abuse, batterers’ lawyers may be privy to information that could avert further harm. Attorneys owe a duty of confidentiality to their clients that can be breached only in extraordinary circumstances, such as when counsel learns her client plans to commit a crime. To resolve the tension between client confidentiality and victim safety, this Article argues that, in the context of domestic violence cases, lawyers have an affirmative duty to (1) screen battering clients who have indicated a likelihood of harming others, (2) attempt to dissuade them from ...


Neglect Of Children's Health: Too Many Irons In The Fire, John E.B. Myers Jan 2006

Neglect Of Children's Health: Too Many Irons In The Fire, John E.B. Myers

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


Losing The Feminist Voice? Debates On The Legal Recognition Of Same Sex Partnerships In Canada, Susan B. Boyd, Claire F.L. Young Jan 2006

Losing The Feminist Voice? Debates On The Legal Recognition Of Same Sex Partnerships In Canada, Susan B. Boyd, Claire F.L. Young

Faculty Publications (Emeriti)

Over the last decade, legal recognition of same-sex relationships in Canada has accelerated. By and large, same-sex cohabitants are now recognised in the same manner as opposite-sex cohabitants, and same-sex marriage was legalised in 2005. Without diminishing the struggle that lesbians and gay men have endured to secure this somewhat revolutionary legal recognition, this article troubles its narrative of progress. In particular, we investigate the terms on which recent legal struggles have advanced, as well as the ways in which resistance to the legal recognition has been expressed and dealt with. We argue that to the extent that feminist critiques ...


Asymmetric Parenthood, Katharine K. Baker Jan 2006

Asymmetric Parenthood, Katharine K. Baker

All Faculty Scholarship

This analysis of the American Law Institute's Principles of Family Law, Chapter 3, examines how the Principles perceive the origins and extent of parental obligation. What is that makes someone financially responsible for a child? Perhaps surprisingly, the Drafters of this key chapter of the Principles spend remarkably little time analyzing that question. Instead, to determine who has parental obligation, the Principles rely on extant legal paternity and parenthood doctrine that is itself completely muddled. To determine the extent of parental obligation, the Principles employ a binary biological ideal of parenthood that fails to reflect reality for close to ...


Seeking Different Treatment, Or Seeking The Same Regard: Remarketing The Transracial Adoption Debate, Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 2006

Seeking Different Treatment, Or Seeking The Same Regard: Remarketing The Transracial Adoption Debate, Angela Mae Kupenda

Journal Articles

The transracial adoption discourse mistakenly has been phrased as a request for black children awaiting adoption to be treated different from white children and to be placed with parents of like race only. This paper urges a remarketing of the transracial adoption debate to reflect a request based on sameness, not difference. The request presented here is not a request for different treatment for black children. Rather, it is for black children to be given the same regard that is given to white children. This request is illustrated with the story of a black couple seeking to adopt healthy, fat ...


Marriage, Biology, And Paternity: The Case For Revitalizing The Marital Presumption, Jana B. Singer Jan 2006

Marriage, Biology, And Paternity: The Case For Revitalizing The Marital Presumption, Jana B. Singer

Faculty Scholarship

This article examines the recent history and current status of the marital presumption of paternity. It explores the social, economic and legal developments that have contributed to the erosion of the presumption, focusing in particular on the efforts of federal and state governments to identify and collect financial support from unmarried biological fathers. The article then describes the procedural and equitable doctrines that some courts and legislatures have used to bolster the marital presumption in the face of conflicting biological evidence. Finding these approaches problematic, the article advocates a revitalized marital presumption as a substantive rule of law. It argues ...


Intimate Partner Violence: Implications For The Domestic Relations Practitioner, Carol E. Jordan Jan 2006

Intimate Partner Violence: Implications For The Domestic Relations Practitioner, Carol E. Jordan

Office for Policy Studies on Violence Against Women Publications

No abstract provided.


Private Ordering Under The Ali Principles: As Natural As Status, Martha M. Ertman Jan 2006

Private Ordering Under The Ali Principles: As Natural As Status, Martha M. Ertman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Constitutional Thematics And The Peculiar Federal Marriage Amendment, Scott Dodson Jan 2006

Constitutional Thematics And The Peculiar Federal Marriage Amendment, Scott Dodson

Faculty Publications

These symposium remarks are a discussion of themes running through the Constitution, how the FMA, if adopted, might affect those themes, and why we ought to care. I first demonstrate that our Constitution is a thematic document, filled with broad, recognizable, and (mostly) coherent concepts. Separation of powers, representative democracy, federalism, individual liberty, and equality come readily to mind. I then explain that the thematic nature and the inter-coherence of these themes is critical in two ways: to identify those values held to be fundamental in our society, and to assist in the interpretation of the Constitution. The themes in ...


Principles Of U.S. Family Law, Vivian E. Hamilton Jan 2006

Principles Of U.S. Family Law, Vivian E. Hamilton

Faculty Publications

What explains U.S. family law? What are the origins of the current chaos and controversy in the field, the home of some of the most vituperative debates in public policy? To answer these questions, this Article identifies and examines family law's foundational principles. It undertakes a conceptual analysis of the legal practices that govern families. This analysis has yet to be done, and its absence hamstrings constructive thought on our family law. The Article develops a typology that conceptualizes U.S. family law and exposes its underlying principles. First, it identifies the significant elements, or rules, of family ...


To Protect And Defend: Assigning Parental Rights When Parents Are Living In Poverty, Karen Czapanskiy Jan 2006

To Protect And Defend: Assigning Parental Rights When Parents Are Living In Poverty, Karen Czapanskiy

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


My Two Dads: Disaggreagating Biological And Social Paternity, Melanie B. Jacobs Jan 2006

My Two Dads: Disaggreagating Biological And Social Paternity, Melanie B. Jacobs

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Same-Sex Marriage, Indian Tribes, And The Constitution, Matthew L.M. Fletcher Jan 2006

Same-Sex Marriage, Indian Tribes, And The Constitution, Matthew L.M. Fletcher

Faculty Publications

A same-sex marriage amendment, depending on the text, might serve to incorporate Indian tribes into the federal union as the third sovereign. The Constitution has not been amended to incorporate Indian tribes into the federal union, rendering their place in Our Federalism uncertain and unpredictable. A same-sex marriage amendment that applies to limit or expand tribal authority to recognize or authorize same-sex marriage could constitute an implicit recognition of Indian tribes as the third sovereign in the American system of federalism. Even an amendment that excludes mention of Indian tribes may have something to say about Indian tribes as the ...