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An Analysis Of The Link Between Ethanol, Energy, And Crop Markets, Simla Tokgoz, Amani E. Elobeid Nov 2006

An Analysis Of The Link Between Ethanol, Energy, And Crop Markets, Simla Tokgoz, Amani E. Elobeid

CARD Working Papers

This study analyzes the impact of price shocks in three input and output markets critical to ethanol: gasoline, corn, and sugar. We investigate the impact of these shocks on ethanol and related agricultural markets in the United States and Brazil. We find that the composition of a country's vehicle fleet determines the direction of the response of ethanol consumption to changes in the gasoline price. We also find that a change in feedstock costs affects the profitability of ethanol producers and the domestic ethanol price. In Brazil, where two commodities compete for sugarcane, changes in the sugar market affect ...


The Long-Run Impact Of Corn-Based Ethanol On The Grain, Oilseed, And Livestock Sectors: A Preliminary Assessment, Amani E. Elobeid, Simla Tokgoz, Dermot J. Hayes, Bruce A. Babcock, Chad E. Hart Nov 2006

The Long-Run Impact Of Corn-Based Ethanol On The Grain, Oilseed, And Livestock Sectors: A Preliminary Assessment, Amani E. Elobeid, Simla Tokgoz, Dermot J. Hayes, Bruce A. Babcock, Chad E. Hart

CARD Briefing Papers

The ongoing growth of corn-based ethanol production raises some fundamental questions about what impact continued growth will have on U.S. and world agriculture. Estimates of the long-run potential for ethanol production can be made by calculating the corn price at which the incentive to expand ethanol production disappears. Under current ethanol tax policy, if the prices of crude oil, natural gas, and distillers grains stay at current levels, then the break-even corn price is $4.05 per bushel. A multi-commodity, multi-country system of integrated commodity models is used to estimate the impacts if we ever get to $4.05 ...


Removal Of U.S. Ethanol Domestic And Trade Distortions: Impact On U.S. And Brazilian Ethanol Markets, Amani E. Elobeid, Simla Tokgoz Oct 2006

Removal Of U.S. Ethanol Domestic And Trade Distortions: Impact On U.S. And Brazilian Ethanol Markets, Amani E. Elobeid, Simla Tokgoz

CARD Working Papers

We analyze the impact of trade liberalization and removal of the federal tax credit in the United States on U.S. and Brazilian ethanol markets using a multi-market international ethanol model calibrated on 2005 market data and policies. The removal of trade distortions induces a 23.2 percent increase in the price of world ethanol on average between 2006 and 2015 relative to the baseline. The U.S. domestic ethanol price decreases by 14.1 percent, which results in a 7.5 percent decline in production and a 3.2 percent increase in consumption. The lower domestic price leads to ...


Ethanol Production From Grain, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia May 2006

Ethanol Production From Grain, Department Of Agriculture And Food, Western Australia

All other publications

Two methods are currently used to produce ethanol from grain: wet milling and dry milling. The adjectives ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ describe the method, not the product. The different methods affect both the profitability and logistics. Dry mills produce ethanol, distillers' grain and carbon dioxide (Figure 1). The carbon dioxide is a co-product of the fermentation, and the distillers’ dried grain with solubles (DDGS) is a non-animal based, high protein livestock feed supplement, produced from the distillation and dehydration process. If distillers' grains are not dried, they are referred to as distillers' wet grain (DWG). Wet mill facilities are ‘bio-refineries’ producing ...